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texting at work

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scoochy

Specializes in PACU, CARDIAC ICU, TRAUMA, SICU, LTC. Has 32 years experience.

What did we do before the advent of cell phones?? We actually interacted with and helped our co-workers, gave patients back rubs, kept our break room clean, etc.. What is so important that it can't wait until your shift is over?? Checking on children is one thing, but having a casual conversation is not acceptable, IMO.

My phone goes off and into my lunchbox at work. I do carry my ipod touch but only for the calculator fxn and to occasionally play some music through the desktop speakers. (I have tinnitus and I hear better with soft music playing...)

I don't want calls at work and have told my family that. (Of course in a real emergency I do but most calls are "it can wait" calls.)

I have a coworker on the PM shift. He accepts calls for 20-30 minutes each night and I find that annoying. When I am at work I am there to take care of my job......If I need to make a call it is done on my breaks or on very rare occasions while I am sitting at the desk.

I've heard (but not seen) that she was once texting with one hand while setting an IV pump with the other.

That really is a disgrace! It's one thing to text while standing idle in the hallway but its just disrespectful to the profession and to the patient to text while actually setting an IV etc.

It makes me angry -- and I haven't even started my nursing course!

Hoozdo, ADN

Specializes in ICU, Research, Corrections. Has 15 years experience.

That really is a disgrace! It's one thing to text while standing idle in the hallway but its just disrespectful to the profession and to the patient to text while actually setting an IV etc.

It makes me angry -- and I haven't even started my nursing course!

Maybe she was checking Y-site IV compatibility on her phone/PDA while hooking up the IV.

Assuming someone is texting is sort of like my patients thinking I am playing on the internet while I am completing hours of charting electronically!

BULLYDAWGRN, RN

Specializes in ICU/ER/TRANSPORT. Has 10 years experience.

i'll say that everyone agrees that you cant let cell phones and trival computer time interfere with your job. but i'm not going to turn off my cell or not responsed to a text when time permits it no matter how bad a patient wants a back rub...besides i'll just send a text to one of the hospital massage therapist or their assistants to come for that urgent consult..

cell phones are off when working, no cell phones allowed, It can be automatic termination if on the floor with one. this is how it is where I work, this place employees 1000 people. It is a state facility too.

DolceVita, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in IMCU. Has 10 years experience.

i'll say that everyone agrees that you cant let cell phones and trival computer time interfere with your job. but i'm not going to turn off my cell or not responsed to a text when time permits it no matter how bad a patient wants a back rub...besides i'll just send a text to one of the hospital massage therapist or their assistants to come for that urgent consult..

You just contradicted yourself.

SmilingBluEyes

Specializes in Specializes in L/D, newborn, GYN, LTC, Dialysis. Has 24 years experience.

One word: Don't!

scoochy

Specializes in PACU, CARDIAC ICU, TRAUMA, SICU, LTC. Has 32 years experience.

Giving a patient a back rub is a good assessment tool as well as making a patient more comfortable. While giving a back rub, you can assess skin integrity, as well as posterior breath sounds. It is disconcerting, IMO, that responding to a text message takes priority over a nursing intervention such as a back rub. It is the little extras we can provide for a patient that can go a loooooong way....

scoochy

Specializes in PACU, CARDIAC ICU, TRAUMA, SICU, LTC. Has 32 years experience.

A subway car operator in Boston was texting while navigating the car. Caused a MAJOR disaster..fatalities. Needless to say, the operator is no longer in the employ of the Boston MTA. There will be more consequences of the operator's actions. This is an example of how texting can be a recipe for disaster while on duty!

nursel56

Specializes in Peds/outpatient FP,derm,allergy/private duty. Has 45 years experience.

Giving a patient a back rub is a good assessment tool as well as making a patient more comfortable. While giving a back rub, you can assess skin integrity, as well as posterior breath sounds. It is disconcerting, IMO, that responding to a text message takes priority over a nursing intervention such as a back rub. It is the little extras we can provide for a patient that can go a loooooong way....

I was taught the backrub was a standard part of HS care to always be offered. Not that it actually ever happened when I was hospitalized a couple of times back in the eighties. Well, one person did ask me if I wanted a backrub at around 2130 my third night there. I'm sure I looked at her with eyes as wide as saucers. I declined, figuring if she was cool enough to offer, she deserved the 10 minutes to sit down instead. :) :up: (but I don't think she sat down)

emt123277

Specializes in Critical Care (ICU and ER).

That's my point, these can be tools of the trade but if their use is predominently personal we're going to end up like the "state facility that services 1000 people". I suppose sitting here on the computer posting to the forum isn't any more forgivable than texting either. Oh well, back to the backrubs!

THanks Darla & all who gave me kudos!

I love to text, as it is short in sweet. BUt I think cell phones should be turned off (volume) and kept in one's locker while on the clock. Esp. in nursing! For Christ's sake!