Jump to content

Terms used to describe APNs - what do people call you?

NP   (9,175 Views 27 Comments)

traumaRUs - Judy has 27 years experience as a MSN, APRN, CNS and specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU.

15 Followers; 166 Articles; 190,572 Profile Views; 21,022 Posts

okay - figured we could use a new thread on what people call us in our everyday work environment.

 

for me, i work in a large nephrology practice. i practice in the apn role and in my state, (il), you must sign your name and then apn and if want to add some other initials, you can.

 

the term mid-level and physican extender are used in my practice. mid-level moreso. in our practice we, have pas, nps and a cns. so, the term apn to refer to all of us would not be correct.

 

personally i don't mind mid-level but think physician extender sounds kinda crass.

 

what do you guys think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

madwife2002 has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN.

1 Follower; 74 Articles; 4,777 Posts; 120,623 Profile Views

We dont have APN's we have NP's can you explain the difference as truthfully I dont know and I am interested to find out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

14 Followers; 19 Articles; 13,128 Posts; 137,369 Profile Views

APN=advanced practice nurse; one who is an RN and advances their practice to become an NP, CNS, CNM, or CRNA

NP=APN

PA is not a nurse, so cannot use APN to identify them.

We are recognized as mid-levels, too. I have no issues with that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

eglide87 has 15 years experience.

25 Posts; 1,909 Profile Views

We are designated mid level providers. I have no issue with the term. We also have NPs and PAs in our facility. Also, I refer to myself by first name when addressing the patients and families. Its a childrens hospital and hierachy amongst providers is almost non existent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

1,820 Posts; 15,773 Profile Views

Our center uses affiliates which I dislike because it sounds like the greeters at Wal-Mart. We generally use PAs and NPs. The problem with physician extender and mid-level is that they lack definition. As Nomadcrna points out it also implies that the care we give is less than that of a physician. Despite the fact that legally it has to be equivalent. There are also a host of other professions that crowd into the area. For example are WOCNs are obviously not "basic-level" providers (whatever that is). Does that make them mid-level providers?

If you have to lump people together the term Non-physician provider (NPP) is defined by Medicare as a PA, NP, CNS (in states with advanced practice privileges) and CNM who has the ability to bill Medicare. Its got a legal definition and a finite number of people that it covers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nomadcrna has 30 years experience as a CRNA, NP and specializes in Anesthesia, Pain, Emergency Medicine.

705 Posts; 14,042 Profile Views

I agree with the last poster.

We don't provide a different level of care and are held to the same standard. So why do we put up with the term mid-level provider?

I also want to support my certifying organization.

When the term mid-level comes up, I politely correct them and move on. I've not run into any issues so far. Most people don't even remotely understand our practice. Even RNs and NPs many times have no clue as to our practice. I still occasionally run into an RN who thinks I need "supervision".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

NPinWCH has 15 years experience and specializes in Family NP, OB Nursing.

374 Posts; 6,546 Profile Views

My office calls everyone "provider" meaning that patients are asked, "Which provider are you here to see?" The parent company uses the terms physician and non-physician provider, though some people in the head office still use mid-level.

I'm fine with provider or NP, but I don't care for mid-level. I always introduce myself as a nurse practitioner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

winterwonderland has 15 years experience.

9 Posts; 1,113 Profile Views

Has anyone worked with CNP that lets their patients and family refer to them as Doctor? Is this legal?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BCgradnurse has 9 years experience and specializes in allergy and asthma, urgent care.

1 Follower; 1 Article; 1,656 Posts; 49,242 Profile Views

In my clinic we are all referred to as providers-NPs, CNMs, PAs, MDs. A lot of my patients insist on calling me "doctor", although I am quick to correct them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

nomadcrna has 30 years experience as a CRNA, NP and specializes in Anesthesia, Pain, Emergency Medicine.

705 Posts; 14,042 Profile Views

I introduce myself as Dr. Ray, a nurse practitioner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

sirI has 30 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB.

14 Followers; 19 Articles; 13,128 Posts; 137,369 Profile Views

I've had patients call me Doctor and I correct them. Some continue to do so and consider it a term of respect. Often, it is futile to correct them. I never hold out myself as being a Doctor, however.

With the DNP coming into play now, many APNs possess that degree and use the title, "Doctor". As pointed out by the previous poster, APNs with a doctorate can (with some exceptions), call themselves, "Doctor XYZ", a Nurse Practitioner or CRNA, etc.

Some states do have laws into effect barring the doctorally-prepared APN from using Doctor in the title (in the clinical area).

APNs must be familiar with their own state Laws.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

linearthinker has 25 years experience as a DNP, RN and specializes in FNP.

1,688 Posts; 12,162 Profile Views

When I complete the DNP, I will still refer to myself as Linear, but if someone calls me "Dr. Thinker," I won't correct them unless I think they are under the impression I am a physician. So long as I am confident that they know I am a NP, they can call me whatever they want to call me, preferably Linear. For now, legally, I'm Linear Thinker, CFNP. My state is moving to changing the designation to ARNP for everyone. In fact, my new physician employers told me they are going to order my lab coat monogrammed that way in anticipation of the change. As if I care! I'd never be caught dead in that polyester nightmare anyway. ;) Which by the way, lurkers, is a full length job that is going to come all the way to my ankles. I'd look like a hobbit in that thing. Apparently they either aren't aware of, or are unimpressed by, the lab coat length issue. And they are MDs. Imagine.

FWIW, when I earn it, I intend to use Linear Thinker, DNP and sign my name that way. I think it is most appropriate to use one's professional degree.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×