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Teaching w/o a MSN in nursing education...

Posted

Specializes in oncology/BMT, general medicine. Has 3 years experience.

Are there any educators that do not have their MSN in nursing education but in another specialty area? Do you teach in a basic nursing program or in that particular speciality area? Any thoughts on this...

jossjjojo

Specializes in Cardiology. Has 28 years experience.

Are there any educators that do not have their MSN in nursing education but in another specialty area? Do you teach in a basic nursing program or in that particular speciality area? Any thoughts on this...

I believe you can teach an LPN program with a BSN and can also teach Medical Assistants and CNT's.

StephRN08

Specializes in oncology/BMT, general medicine. Has 3 years experience.

I am referring to teaching with a MSN in an area other than nursing education...

I teach for a college based paramedic programme; however, the nursing programmes have no interest in instructors without upper level nursing degrees.

StephRN08

Specializes in oncology/BMT, general medicine. Has 3 years experience.

Again, I am referring to having an MSN but not with a concentration in nursing education. This means having an MSN with a specialty in administration, informatics, research, etc. Is there anyone out there with an MSN in an area other than nursing education that is an educator?

Again, I am referring to having an MSN but not with a concentration in nursing education. This means having an MSN with a specialty in administration, informatics, research, etc. Is there anyone out there with an MSN in an area other than nursing education that is an educator?

All of my nursing instructors had their MSN in a non-education specialty, with the exception of the programme director. So, yes, you absolutely can teach.

There were some of my instructors that had MSN's in other areas but they had post masters certificates in education. If they had a leadership or management degree they had to be taking classes towards an education certification. There was one instructor that had a BSN and a Master of Education not an MSN. This was just at my school. I don't know about others.

My NS professors were NPs, CNLs, CNS's, and CNMs. I don't think there was a single instructor at my school (BSN, major university) who had a CNE. My current educator at work doesn't even have an MS, the last one was a CNL.

SummerGarden, ADN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ED, ICU, MS/MT, PCU, CM, House Sup, Frontline mgr. Has 12 years experience.

yes, all of my adn program instructors had an msn in something other then nursing education except the director of the program.

kakamegamama

Specializes in MCH,NICU,NNsy,Educ,Village Nursing.

I taught a combination of 10 years---BSN and ADN programs. Initially, I had a MS-Nursing, Maternal/Child CNS focus. Having a MS-Education or Masters-Nursig Education does not necessarily mean one has more knowledge about nursing, but about teaching-learning theories/methodologies. I found that the majority of my teaching colleagues had MS in nursing, non-education specialties.

A formal concentration in education in an MSN program is a relatively new development -- the vast majority of nursing faculty in the US have MSNs in specialties other than education. Besides going through nursing school (diploma and BSN completion) and grad school, I've taught in both ADN and BSN programs, and until fairly recently, I had never encountered anyone teaching with an MSN in nursing education. In following the position postings for nursing education in my state, I've never yet seen a job posting that specified that a school was looking for someone with an MSN particularly in nursing education -- the postings usually specify (if they do specify) that they're looking for someone with an MSN in a particular clinical specialty and advanced practice certification in that specialty.

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 43 years experience.

I suspect if varies significantly based on location. For example, if you live in an area where the local universities offer an MSN in nursing education, then it would be common to find people with that particular specialty MSN. They would then set the cultural norm that either an MSN in nursing education or a post-master's cerfificate in education would be expected of a faculty member.

However, in another geographic area ... in which the local schools produce more MSN grads with clinical practice specialties (CNS's, NP's, etc.) ... there would be fewer people around with an MSN focusing on nursing education. The cultural norm would be different, with most faculty having a the MSN's focusing on a particular clinical role and/or patient population.

I've lived in several areas of the country and have seen a wide variety of expectations for faculty preparation.

dorimar, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, Education. Has 25 years experience.

My school requires MS or MSN for nursing instructors to teach in the classroom. While they do NOT require ED focus of the degree, it is a plus.

Whispera, MSN, RN

Specializes in psych, addictions, hospice, education.

I teach in a BSN program without a MSN in nursing education. I dare to say most nurses who teach don't have that degree since it's relatively new.