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Swan Ganz for dummies?

Posted

Specializes in critical care, med/surg. Has 9 years experience.

Can anyone help me with finding some info/education modules on swans? We don't use them alot, but I feel somewhat clueless when I get a patient with one.:confused:

Thanks!

MelRN13

Specializes in critical care, med/surg. Has 9 years experience.

I found some very useful info on http://www.icufaqs.org.

Any other useful websites?

zambezi, BSN, RN

Specializes in CCU (Coronary Care); Clinical Research.

I agree with code blue chic...it is a very good site. Other than that, practice, practice, practice...that is the best way...for me it didn't make sense until I used it frequently (which sounds like a problem on your unit) but try as hard as you can to work with them as often as you can unitl you become comfortable...

i think it is beneficial to know about what a SG cath actually measures and what those numbers actually mean. Previous to high technology we actually had to manually calculate SVR's and CO's and i think it helped me in the process of learning about hemodynamics. About 8 yrs. ago i found a very good article that gave a good summation and would be happy to reference it for anyone or fax it. pm if i can help.

MelRN13

Specializes in critical care, med/surg. Has 9 years experience.

Thanks for the replies!

XIGRIS

Specializes in DNAP Student.

Hi,

Please don't be intimidated by PA caths. I would rather have one than none at all. Consider it as a friend. If you are in Texas you could attend my class. A few of my students who are still in nursng school are exposed to it and I always let them handle patients with PA caths. I am happy to say that these students can immediately go to CVICU.

Also, you need to have a preceptor that is knowledgeable about PA catheters and know their physiologic use of it. Not just someone whjo knows how to use it because it is a routine.

The preceptor will have to be able to explain to you which reading in you PA measurement is preload and afterload. Which correspond to contractility and be able to correlate this to hemodynamics.

Another important factor is that, the preceptor if you have any should know how to read and measure the waveform accurately. You know if someone knows PA catheter if he is able to locate a A waves in your CVP or PAOP to make an accurate reading.

Again, it takes practice and pracitice makes perfect.

Thanks codebluechic, the pacep website is really nice. I've shared it with my co-staff and they all loved it.

ONSnrs

Specializes in oncology.

index

Thanks for the info, this internet site rocks, i am going to definately buy the book.

ons:monkeydance: :monkeydance: :monkeydance:

gwenith, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

Personally I cannot wait for technology to relegate the Swann-Ganz to the medical museums. There are some nice innovations out there at the moment.

RNforLongTime

Specializes in Med-Surg Nursing.

My ICU/CCU is sooo small, we havent seen a Swan all year!

sming

Specializes in critical care. Has 28 years experience.

I could e-mail you a copy of a project I did. It is a cd from very basic to advanced, and i am not sure if i could e-mail it to you from the site

MelRN13

Specializes in critical care, med/surg. Has 9 years experience.

This was a topic over 3 years old, thanks but I don't need the info anymore

BackPackerRN

Specializes in ICU, CVICU.

Our orientation requires going through pacep.org. And it is great to go back to for referrence as well.

:monkeydance:

Can anyone help me with finding some info/education modules on swans? We don't use them alot, but I feel somewhat clueless when I get a patient with one.:confused:

Thanks!

:monkeydance: Hey Tele, of course there is someone out there who wants you to take their class. The best way is hands on. Even if it isn't your patient, you should go into the room, see how it's hooked up and look at the numbers. They aren't really using swan ganz catheters like they did in the past. You generally don't see them at small hospitals. You will see a few in large teaching facilities. Remember they are merely numbers. I always pretend my patient doesn't have one, remember to look at the patient first. You see physicians not even documenting numbers in their progress notes, yet we have to every few hours or so. The only ones who follow generally at the thoracic surgeons. Also too, these patients numbers aren't going to be normal, if they were, they wouldn't have had the swan inserted. Remember to that you must be properly leveled with the phlebostatic axis, other wise the numbers don't mean a thing. Hope this helps.

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