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Study: Immunity To Coronavirus May Fade Away Within Weeks

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Many patients who have recovered from Covid-19 may lose their immunity to the disease within months, according to research from scientists at King's College London, which, if proven true, will have wide implications for vaccine development and could put a "nail in the coffin" in the idea that herd immunity to the coronavirus is attainable.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tommybeer/2020/07/13/study-immunity-to-coronavirus-may-fade-away-within-weeks/#465a70e221bc

So there goes the herd immunity theory......

8 minutes ago, NurseBlaq said:

So there goes the herd immunity theory......

Yes , I think it's true. 

I will tell you from personal experience, although non medically verified. 

I think I might have had Covid19 at the end of January. I live in central FL and had traveled to Miami two weeks back. It started with a sore throat. Malaise. Feeling very very tired. Progressed to spiking low grade fever.At that point I called in sick, and went to one of the urgent care centers ( was working in SNF so no help on site). Tested negative for both Influenza A and B,and was Dx with sinusitis. I felt as I was dying for a few days, I could hardly make it to the bathroom. Recovered in about 7-8 days total. 

Now I have started working with Covid patients . I feel ran down and tired, no other symptoms but just tired. Maybe I am exhausted, maybe I caught it again? We got re-tested today so we shall see tomorrow. 

I will update. 

 

Edited by NewRN'16

Just now, NurseBlaq said:

Hope all goes well.

Thank you ❤️,I hope so as well. We are extremely short staffed, I need to be at work. But we shall see. 

A Hit With The Ladies, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych.

Key words in the OP were "may" and "if proven true".

Dr. Hotez (who is the wannabe Fauci in my city) even said that if COVID cases keep spiking here we'll have to do the herd immunity thing:

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If the current COVID-related restrictions aren’t tightened in Houston and Harris County, he said, people will continue to be infected until the area reaches “herd immunity” — meaning that the rate of infection drops because fewer uninfected people remain for the virus to reach. It’s frequently estimated that 60 percent of a population must be infected with COVID before the group achieves herd immunity.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Hotez-Houston-needs-COVID-action-now-The-15364521.php

herring_RN, ASN, BSN

Specializes in Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical.

There is much we still don't know. I'm still hoping to continue improving treatment and for a vaccine.

15 minutes ago, herring_RN said:

There is much we still don't know. I'm still hoping to continue improving treatment and for a vaccine.

I agree. This virus and its effects against human body is still to be studied, as it is all over the place. 

Speaking of which, this is not the time to open up Universal , Disney World and SCHOOLS! 

wake up!! @ FL @ Republicans

 

A Hit With The Ladies, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych.

16 minutes ago, NewRN'16 said:

Speaking of which, this is not the time to open up Universal , Disney World and SCHOOLS! 

Even the pediatricians' groups are calling for the schools to be reopened. For the Corona-obsessed, I guess now these pediatricians' heads have got to roll. Only they and those who agree with their own worldviews get to be the "experts" we all have to blindly obey. Everyone else gets to be labeled a "troll" and "non-compliant" and cancel cultured to oblivion for Orwellian thoughtcrimes.

"Why pediatricians are pushing for kids to go back to school in the fall: What's at stake for kids' development, mental health, nutrition and more." (ABC News)

https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Wellness/pediatricians-pushing-kids-back-school-fall/story?id=71696668

Edited by A Hit With The Ladies

7 hours ago, A Hit With The Ladies said:

Key words in the OP were "may" and "if proven true".

Dr. Hotez (who is the wannabe Fauci in my city) even said that if COVID cases keep spiking here we'll have to do the herd immunity thing:

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Hotez-Houston-needs-COVID-action-now-The-15364521.php

There are many cases where people have been reinfected, even after testing positive then negative after the virus has run its course. There is no herd immunity. People will test positive meaning there won't be too many more people who will get the virus if damn near all of them have it.

However, based upon people being reinfected, that's what will happen and it will continue to pass round from those who are newly infected to those who were previously infected and the cycle will continue.

Also, how much damage will be done considering some people have long term circulation and cardiac effects due to the clotting covid causes. This virus is no joke! They're still learning about it and what the science/medical communities have learned thus far is not good.

6 hours ago, A Hit With The Ladies said:

Even the pediatricians' groups are calling for the schools to be reopened. For the Corona-obsessed, I guess now these pediatricians' heads have got to roll. Only they and those who agree with their own worldviews get to be the "experts" we all have to blindly obey. Everyone else gets to be labeled a "troll" and "non-compliant" and cancel cultured to oblivion for Orwellian thoughtcrimes.

"Why pediatricians are pushing for kids to go back to school in the fall: What's at stake for kids' development, mental health, nutrition and more." (ABC News)

https://abcnews.go.com/GMA/Wellness/pediatricians-pushing-kids-back-school-fall/story?id=71696668

They walked it back. As usual, it was misinterpreted and misquoted by Trump admin.

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The American Academy of Pediatrics has clarified its stance on school reopening amid the COVID-19 pandemic after the Trump administration repeatedly used the academy’s previous statement to pressure school systems to resume in-person learning in the fall.

The AAP, in a joint statement with three large education organizations, emphasized that school reopening should be driven by science and safety—“not politics.” It also directly responded to President Trump’s threat of withholding funding from schools that did not reopen, calling the move a “misguided approach.”

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2020/07/pediatricians-walk-back-school-reopening-stance-as-who-gives-dire-warning/

 

 

A Hit With The Ladies, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych.

17 minutes ago, NurseBlaq said:

There are many cases where people have been reinfected, even after testing positive then negative after the virus has run its course. There is no herd immunity. People will test positive meaning there won't be too many more people who will get the virus if damn near all of them have it.

However, based upon people being reinfected, that's what will happen and it will continue to pass round from those who are newly infected to those who were previously infected and the cycle will continue.

Also, how much damage will be done considering some people have long term circulation and cardiac effects due to the clotting covid causes. This virus is no joke! They're still learning about it and what the science/medical communities have learned thus far is not good.

I don't disagree with you that people can get reinfected from Coronavirus. But at the same time I don't necessarily think that our immune systems won't end up adapting and becoming strong enough after second infection to ward off future reinfections. Needless to say, there hasn't been enough studies yet since this is all so new. But I suspect the outlier cases (e.g., the young infant or child who dies of COVID) gets disproportionate media coverage, which is then used as a blanket statement to say that all children (for instance) are highly susceptible for a COVID-related infection. So while in all fairness, it might be a bad idea to risk getting re-infected, it may be important to take re-infection findings with a grain of salt since there may be other health-related issues at play (which we don't know of yet) that are really increasing the risk of re-infection. Just my two cents.

There are studies pointing to T cell mediated immunity. B cells produce antibodies, T cells differentiate into memory cells. This was discussed in other threads already. Memory T cells live at least 6 months, and the underlying mechanism that determines if they are cloned and perpetuate longer is not well understood. We don’t know yet how long immunity lasts. Reinfection with memory T cells present would be drastically less severe than the initial infection.

https://science.sciencemag.org/content/early/2020/05/19/science.abc4776

The recent newsworthy vaccine results also produced T cell response in addition to antibodies.

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2022483

Herd immunity could likely be achieved through either a vaccine or the young spreading the virus. Getting from here to there is not going to be pretty at this point no matter what we do. 

Edited by damianus

On 7/15/2020 at 4:12 AM, A Hit With The Ladies said:

I don't disagree with you that people can get reinfected from Coronavirus. But at the same time I don't necessarily think that our immune systems won't end up adapting and becoming strong enough after second infection to ward off future reinfections. Needless to say, there hasn't been enough studies yet since this is all so new. But I suspect the outlier cases (e.g., the young infant or child who dies of COVID) gets disproportionate media coverage, which is then used as a blanket statement to say that all children (for instance) are highly susceptible for a COVID-related infection. So while in all fairness, it might be a bad idea to risk getting re-infected, it may be important to take re-infection findings with a grain of salt since there may be other health-related issues at play (which we don't know of yet) that are really increasing the risk of re-infection. Just my two cents.

Some "suspicions" and two cents worth are definitely to be taken with a grain of salt. 

This is a corona virus. Ie the virus that usually causes colds. I say that just in terms of immunity. Meaning, being a corona virus, why are we all of a sudden expecting it to confer immunity like other viruses? You can get more than one cold a season. I am, obviously, no expert, but this is something that is only now starting to occur to me, after being so hopeful, initially, about antibodies.

herring_RN, ASN, BSN

Specializes in Critical care, tele, Medical-Surgical.

3 hours ago, NormaSaline said:

This is a corona virus. Ie the virus that usually causes colds. I say that just in terms of immunity. Meaning, being a corona virus, why are we all of a sudden expecting it to confer immunity like other viruses? You can get more than one cold a season. I am, obviously, no expert, but this is something that is only now starting to occur to me, after being so hopeful, initially, about antibodies.

More than 200 viruses can cause a cold. Most colds are caused by a Rhinovirus. https://www.CDC.gov/antibiotic-use/community/for-patients/common-illnesses/colds.html

Parainfluenza and respiratory syncytial virus, cause cold symptoms in adults, but can cause produce mild infections in adults but can cause severe lower respiratory tract infections in young children. Coronaviruses are thought to cause a large percentage of all adult colds.

https://web.archive.org/web/20081001232445/http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/topics/commonCold/cause.htm

We have had many patients at our FQHC test positive long after they’re well. Some had a series of tests like this: positive, positive, negative, positive. Did they get reinfected?  Is the virus just staying in their system for a long time, and they had one false negative?  I don’t know. Notable though is the fact that no one has gotten SICK again. Not from my anecdotal experience nor, as far as I am aware, in any reliable data. The test is picking up viral particles, but are these people infectious?  That’s a different question. The studies I’ve seen from Korea suggest they are not, but then who knows at this point. 

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