Are MSN still Grandfathered in to NP?

  1. Hi people,

    I would like to know if anyone has information on if MSN educated nurses are still being grandfathered in to Nurse Practitioners. Is this the same as DNP? And does this apply to MSN Clinical Nurse Leaders? I would just like the details on what is necessary or possible for a MSN CNL to become a nurse practitioner and where can I find more information to follow this.

    Thanks!
  2. Visit charisma00 profile page

    About charisma00

    Joined: Apr '17; Posts: 41; Likes: 8

    18 Comments

  3. by   KatieMI
    As far as I know, CNLs (as well as MSN/Ed) are not, and never were, "grandfathered" to NPs. It is a different track, different coursework, different accreditation bodies and different specialty on license. CNLs have no specialty designation while all NPs have at least one.

    You might want to shop around for reputable NP schools and inquire if they can convert your degree. Quite a few of my peers and classmates went first for non-clinical MSNs, were unhappy with the result for one reason or another and did that. They have to repeat clinicals and do some science courses but at least no more fluff. Some schools even offered what they named "APRN advancement" or something like it class targeting students in just such situation.
  4. by   Rocknurse
    There are still legitimate MSN NP programs out there as there is no mandate to require NPs to become DNPs at this point so there is no need for grandfathering. A DNP program is not the same as an MSN program although they take most of the same classes, but the DNP has a few more research and leadership components. Both sit for the same NP certification exam. I should know because I'm in an MSN program and will graduate as an NP in two more semesters with my Master's. My program is still signing on students for the coming year so there is no mandate in sight. CNLs are not the same as NPs and they follow two distinctly different MSN tracks. A CNL may become an NP but they would have to do a post-graduate program and sit for the NP certification exam.
  5. by   charisma00
    Quote from KatieMI
    As far as I know, CNLs (as well as MSN/Ed) are not, and never were, "grandfathered" to NPs. It is a different track, different coursework, different accreditation bodies and different specialty on license. CNLs have no specialty designation while all NPs have at least one.

    You might want to shop around for reputable NP schools and inquire if they can convert your degree. Quite a few of my peers and classmates went first for non-clinical MSNs, were unhappy with the result for one reason or another and did that. They have to repeat clinicals and do some science courses but at least no more fluff. Some schools even offered what they named "APRN advancement" or something like it class targeting students in just such situation.
    Ah ok. What makes a program "non clinical"? I'm sorry for any of my ignorance, nursing has so many directions and path options, my head hasn't stopped spinning.
    For the APRN advancement, is that like a certification? So i can take my MSN CNL degree and get certified as an NP?
  6. by   charisma00
    Quote from Rocknurse
    There are still legitimate MSN NP programs out there as there is no mandate to require NPs to become DNPs at this point so there is no need for grandfathering. A DNP program is not the same as an MSN program although they take most of the same classes, but the DNP has a few more research and leadership components. Both sit for the same NP certification exam. I should know because I'm in an MSN program and will graduate as an NP in two more semesters with my Master's. My program is still signing on students for the coming year so there is no mandate in sight. CNLs are not the same as NPs and they follow two distinctly different MSN tracks. A CNL may become an NP but they would have to do a post-graduate program and sit for the NP certification exam.
    OKay. I would like to know, how long can we expect there to be no mandate? I'm afraid I may get my MSN CNL and constantly look over my shoulder between the time it takes me to gain substantial experience and then go for further schooling. I just want to be a nurse practitioner and not have my path become invalid in the process.
    Also its very interesting you should say DNP has more research and leadership components, it may be that those components from CNL program may be transferable...(hopefully)
  7. by   Buckeye.nurse
    Clinical nurse leader (or CNL), is a brand new branch of advanced practice nursing. It's distinct from clinical nurse specialists (CNS) and nurse practitioners (NPs). I'm almost positive that you can only become certified in the area you studied (so a CNL student can only become certified as a nurse leader). Here are a few links I found that might help you or answer some questions.

    What is a CNL? | Clinical Nurse Leader Association
    Clinical Nurse Leader | College of Nursing
  8. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from charisma00
    Ah ok. What makes a program "non clinical"? I'm sorry for any of my ignorance, nursing has so many directions and path options, my head hasn't stopped spinning.
    For the APRN advancement, is that like a certification? So i can take my MSN CNL degree and get certified as an NP?
    A CNL often has a teaching role, and so no, they are not an NP. If you want to be an NP then you have to do an NP program. A CNL is a CNL, and an NP is an NP...two different roles. CNLs often hold positions as clinical educators but do not have NP responsibilities. From what I've heard CNLs are kind of getting phased out and so it would not be a good return on investment to do one of those programs.

    I'd like to add something that I just read not 5 minutes ago. As of 2025, all aspiring NPs will likely have to do a DNP program because yesterday National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) made the commitment to move all entry-level nurse practitioner (NP) education to the DNP degree by 2025.
  9. by   charisma00
    Quote from Rocknurse
    A CNL often has a teaching role, and so no, they are not an NP. If you want to be an NP then you have to do an NP program. A CNL is a CNL, and an NP is an NP...two different roles. CNLs often hold positions as clinical educators but do not have NP responsibilities. From what I've heard CNLs are kind of getting phased out and so it would not be a good return on investment to do one of those programs.


    I'd like to add something that I just read not 5 minutes ago. As of 2025, all aspiring NPs will likely have to do a DNP program because yesterday National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties (NONPF) made the commitment to move all entry-level nurse practitioner (NP) education to the DNP degree by 2025.

    Oh my! Where'd you hear that? I'd love to read more.
  10. by   elkpark
    If you know that your goal is to be an NP, why would you waste time, money, and effort on a CNL degree first? Why are you not just applying for NP programs?
  11. by   Rocknurse
    Quote from charisma00
    Oh my! Where'd you hear that? I'd love to read more.
    http://c.ymcdn.com/sites/www.nonpf.o...NP_Stateme.pdf
  12. by   KatieMI
    Just letting you know, most of the non-clinical MSN grads I mentioned in my post were not happy because they couldn't find jobs. Most of them had at least a few years in bedside and some (though not all) were in University of Michigan or reputable local brick-and-mortar school.

    The area I live now has one or two CNLs around, as opposed even to MSN/Ed's.
  13. by   Dranger
    I am in a MSN ACNP program. I will not pursue a DNP unless it is mandated, has clinical value or increases my pay.
  14. by   SopranoKris
    Quote from Dranger
    I am in a MSN ACNP program. I will not pursue a DNP unless it is mandated, has clinical value or increases my pay.
    I agree. There is currently no further clinical component to the DNP. It's just a glorified research project and it offers no difference in pay scale. Until it is absolutely mandatory in all states, I refuse to do it. The NONPF statement is degree-inflation at its finest. I would be totally on board if it added value, especially in-depth clinical training. But I not will tack on another year of school to write papers and do a "scholarly project" to prove I can follow an EBP rubric.

    To the OP: I would not pursue a CNL degree if you want to become an NP. It would be a waste of time & money.
    Last edit by SopranoKris on May 19

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