Jump to content

Staying in the room with a COVID patient

Disasters   (1,053 Views | 12 Replies)
by CityNurse80 CityNurse80 (New) New Nurse

CityNurse80 has 13 years experience .

64 Profile Views; 3 Posts

Hi everyone,

I'm curious as to what other facilities are doing. The nurses are staying in the ICU rooms for the duration of the shift. We have runners that bring things to you. These rooms are negative pressure and the patients are vented. There's a computer so you're 10-15 ft from the patient. Is this safe practice?

You're wearing N95, face mask, face shield, gowns, booties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Posts; 29 Profile Views

We have CAPR helmets, gowns gloves and are treating it like TB except we are out of negative pressure rooms. The whole unit is being converted to negative pressure and we'll be geared up the entire shift. This is in a MICU. I'm interested in what everyone else is doing. If you have 12hrs continuous contact exposure are you guys doing bunny suits? Is the hospital providing scrubs and place to shower?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CityNurse80 has 13 years experience.

3 Posts; 64 Profile Views

Yes they're providing scrubs, no bunny suits.

Does a CAPR helmet take in the air in the room and gives it to you to cool you? or am I misunderstanding? does it have a filter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,250 Posts; 8,167 Profile Views

We no longer have negative air flow rooms and have more than 1 COVID patient. It’s not possible to stay in a room all shift.

Plus, the N95 mask would smother me to wear for 12 hours!! I’m barely able to go 2 hours without needing a breather.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Posts; 29 Profile Views

It takes the air in through the room. It runs it through a hepa filter and gives you a cool breeze. It's suppose to be equivalent to n95 and with fan on low almost makes it through a full shift. It's actually not to inconvenient. We coded a covid patient wearing them and could still breath normally. They're expensive but seem worth it. It sounds like what you guys are doing is safe practice but resource (staff) intensive. Is it to save ppe? We're trying to find out if the 12hr exposure is unsafe without a hazmat/bunny suit but infectious disease says its safe. I'm still wondering the same thing as you because 12hrs in the room is quite a bit and I guess we're still finding out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Followers; 875 Posts; 5,701 Profile Views

28 minutes ago, DougFreshness said:

It takes the air in through the room. It runs it through a hepa filter and gives you a cool breeze. It's suppose to be equivalent to n95 and with fan on low almost makes it through a full shift. It's actually not to inconvenient. We coded a covid patient wearing them and could still breath normally. They're expensive but seem worth it. It sounds like what you guys are doing is safe practice but resource (staff) intensive. Is it to save ppe? We're trying to find out if the 12hr exposure is unsafe without a hazmat/bunny suit but infectious disease says its safe. I'm still wondering the same thing as you because 12hrs in the room is quite a bit and I guess we're still finding out.

Did they survive?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CCU BSN RN has 7 years experience and specializes in CICU, Telemetry.

272 Posts; 4,645 Profile Views

I'd KILL for the early days when we were 1:1 in the room with our first COVID+ patients. We now have 3-4 intubated, proned patients in the COVID ICU and it's absolutely the least safe nursing experience I've ever had. I'd wear an N95 for 12 hours any day of the week to go back to 1:1 in my patient's room. Hands down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Posts; 29 Profile Views

18 hours ago, NurseBlaq said:

Did they survive?

He survived but meaningful recovery looks grim. Are you guys wearing the same n95s the whole shift? I wouldn't be able to breathe! CCU RN- do you guys use specialty beds or manually proning them? Has it been effective?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Followers; 875 Posts; 5,701 Profile Views

That's sad to code someone knowing they still have a slight chance of survival. Nurses nationwide are going to have PTSD when this is all over. We're used to seeing sickness and death but not on this scale, and especially when it's our coworkers and loved ones in such a short time span and clustered.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CityNurse80 has 13 years experience.

3 Posts; 64 Profile Views

They've changed the policy. Just put everyone on restraint and minimize going in and out the room.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OUxPhys has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardiology.

879 Posts; 9,949 Profile Views

So far my facility has I think 12 covid + pts and we really have never gone over 20 at one time. This is of course split between the PCU and MICU where the PCU has the majority (where I work). What my hospital did was install video monitors in every room, converted every room into a negative pressure room, and we now have extension IV tubing so all IV pumps are outside of the room. My manager and the MDs want to limit our exposure as much as possible so they are working with pharmacy to group and time meds appropriately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CCU BSN RN has 7 years experience and specializes in CICU, Telemetry.

272 Posts; 4,645 Profile Views

Doug we're legit manually proning them. Mind you last night was the first patient I proned who didn't weigh over 120kg. Proning does seem to be the most helpful thing we've done with the ICU COVIDs to actually improve oxygenation and survival in any meaningful way. I now hear that they're encouraging med/surg and non-intubated patients to basically prone themselves in bed which was weird to hear but is kind of cool and new to think about, for me anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.