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small temper

I read these post about Nursing students getting yelled at by other nurses and that to me seems a little out there. I don't like it when someone yells at me, I take offense to that and I would probaly bark back. I know who to respect and who should respect me.

How would you handle the situation if someone came screaming at you?

would you think that was appropriate? :nono:

would you tell someone higher up? :confused:

Would you bark back? :argue:

sirI, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Education, FP, LNC, Forensics, ED, OB. Has 30 years experience.

I read these post about Nursing students getting yelled at by other nurses and that to me seems a little out there. I don't like it when someone yells at me, I take offense to that and I would probaly bark back. I know who to respect and who should respect me.

How would you handle the situation if someone came screaming at you?

would you think that was appropriate? :nono:

would you tell someone higher up? :confused:

Would you bark back? :argue:

Appropriate?..........Never, unless you were doing something that was killing someone and the scream could save that person's life

Tell someone higher up? ...........maybe, if I could not settle it on my own

Bark back?............NEVER, just not professional and you allow yourself to be down on their level

You just have to learn to be professional regarding all confrontations.

If, as a student, I had a nurse screaming at me I would calmly try to explain my side of whatever they were upset about. If they were not interested in hearing anything I had to say then I would just shut up and take what they felt they needed to dish out. After they'd verbally beat me to a pulp I would walk away and inform my instructor of what was going on. Then I would go out and buy a 'Mean People Suck' bumper sticker and slap it on my clinical clipboard.

Then I would go out and buy a 'Mean People Suck' bumper sticker and slap it on my clinical clipboard.

:rotfl: :rotfl: :rotfl:

I agree with Siri.

It is not nice to be spoken to like that, patronised etc.

It would definitely depend on the situation. Sometimes its just not worth trying to justify yourself. If someone was screaming at you its probably them with the problem not you!

bluesky, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ER. Has 4 years experience.

Whatever you would do, I suggest that you practice your plan, because I assure you this situation will happen. :stone :chuckle

renerian, BSN, RN

Specializes in MS Home Health.

I read you post and laughed to myself. I think having had 5 children/4 still home..college etc, I have been yelled at alot.

I just say to them and anyone:

You don't need to yell

I am right here and certainly not deaf (well I am close to it)

Come back when your calm

Count to 10 and come back

I am not your child so stop yelling at me

Do you feel better now

etc.

Barking back makes it worse and your the bigger person and people watch your reactions and admire a person with control

Signs of a good leader.....

renerian

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

I don't talk to anyone screaming at me. I would simply turn around.

I think however when people say things like "the nurse was yelling at me", they are exaggerating. A couple of times, I've asked for clarification...."was the nurse really yelling/screaming at you...". The answer usually is "well no, not exactly yelling, but.....".

Screaming is completely totally unprofressional and unacceptable to me. I would walk away and seriously consider reporting him/her up the chain of command.

RosesrReder, ASN, BSN, MSN, RN

Has 18 years experience.

Appropriate?..........Never, unless you were doing something that was killing someone and the scream could save that person's life

Tell someone higher up? ...........maybe, if I could not settle it on my own

Bark back?............NEVER, just not professional and you allow yourself to be down on their level

You just have to learn to be professional regarding all confrontations.

I would have to agree with Iris. :)

I think if you are a student and the nurse on site yells at you it's probably best to keep your mouth shut and then report it to your instructor. Schools are very picky about how students behave on clinical sites cause they are hard to come by and they don't want to mess up their relations with the staff. The reason to report it to the instructor is so that she/he can hear your side of the story before hearing it from someone else and get mad at you.

That has not happened to me and I am done with my clincals on the hospital floor. So the poster that said it would definitely happen is wrong. At least as a student.

If it DID happen though I would make absolutely sure that they were YELLING and if so, I would inform my instructor.

If they were just being bitchy I usually try and let them know I am not an idiot but still let them know I have a lot to learn from them and I would LOVE to learn from them. It makes them feel special and they usually soften up and then you end up learning from them.. Everyone knows a hostile enviornment is not a good learning enviornment so sometimes it is up to the student to set the enviornment. If I did something wrong, I would immediately apologize and fix it. I learned this technique from being married. hahaha.. I also ask people if they are having a bad day when they are being bitchy. Sometimes they dont realize they are acting that way until someone points it out. I don't come right out and say "you are being a snot!" i say things like "You seem very stressed out. Has it been hectic in here all day?"

I would NEVER yell at another adult. I RARELY yell at my children. There are more effective ways of communicating than yelling. In a work enviornment it is completely Unprofessional and I take professionalism seriously.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

That has not happened to me and I am done with my clincals on the hospital floor. So the poster that said it would definitely happen is wrong. At least as a student.

I can say for sure no one screamed at me during nursing school. In fact, I'm trying to come up with an example of someone screaming at me in the last 14 years and I can't think of a time.

I've had many heated conversations with both patients, coworkers, and even a doctor or two but no yelling or screaming. Guess I'm lucky. :chuckle

Appropriate?..........Never, unless you were doing something that was killing someone and the scream could save that person's life"

Yup. And it has happened!! As in 'pull that wide open K rider off the IJ sideport...your patient is in VTach'..... followed quickly by 'WTH ya think you're doing?" in Vince Lombardi fashion. ;)

And no, that nurse never 'assisted ' with my patient care again...was quickly moved out to medsurg. He was lucky he wasn't fired...I would have. If they cannot listen and learn, they don't need to be in ICU. They can REALLY kill someone in there. :(

Students keep in mind our licenses ARE at risk when you work with our patients. A sharp word may be necessary from time to time.

twinmommy+2, ADN, BSN, MSN

Specializes in ED. Has 15 years experience.

I'm one of the lucky ones that had a nurse scream at me in the middle of the burn unit floor. I was warned about her, and still don't know why they allowed her to be paired with a nursing student. So I tryed to be as diplomatic as possible. I asked her (we couldn't do a thing inside the room unless we got report first) "I know that you are such a busy person, but can I ask you for a report, mabye I can help?" In the middle of the intensive care burn unit she said "REPORT!!! YOU WANT ME TO GIVE YOU A REPORT ARE YOU CRAZY!!! YOU CAN GET IT ALL FROM THE CHART" mumble grumble. I was seated right in front of the patients room and all the patients heard this. Talk about the worst possible experience on the burn ward possible. Plus she was rough with the patient. Just shoved that thermometer right in her ear, she flinched so hard but of course couldn't say anything cause she had a trach and intubated.

I did report her to the instructor but the instructor though. I don't know what became of it.

Just remember that its your experience and how you conduct yourself that will follow you, not how the person treated you. If someone does this, keep your calm, they could come around later, and inform your instructor as soon as possible.

devi, ADN, BSN

Has 12 years experience.

I read these post about Nursing students getting yelled at by other nurses and that to me seems a little out there. I don't like it when someone yells at me, I take offense to that and I would probaly bark back. I know who to respect and who should respect me.

This is something I worry a little about, too. Up until 2 or 3 years ago, I was a BIG pushover. I hated verbal confrontation and just shrunk from it, no matter how small the matter was. I was too timid to even send my order back in a restaurant if it was completely wrong. Yelling was likely to send me straight into tears.

But then something just clicked all of a sudden one day. I don't know what it was or why...maybe just part of growing up for me. My attitude towards confrontation is completely changed now. My temper seems much shorter, and I get angry if someone yells at me instead of hurt.

I don't yell back or anything. My voice gets very quiet, in fact. But the things that come out of my mouth at times like that :stone ... I never knew I could be that way. It's like standing back and watching some alien creature take over my voice, and part of me is cheering "you go, girl...it's about time you stood up for yourself!", but the rest of me says "you are soooo going to get in trouble with that mouth someday".

And I probably will. But I'm trying to train myself to just make comments in my head instead of out loud.

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