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Sign-on bonuses

Posted

Specializes in ER, progressive care. Has 7 years experience.

Have you ever heard of someone not taking a sign-on bonus? Does this look bad to your employer?

sailornurse

Specializes in ER/Tele, Med-Surg, Faculty, Urgent Care. Has 39 years experience.

No not if their are "strings attached" and there usually are. Can you give us some more details?

turnforthenurse, MSN, NP

Specializes in ER, progressive care. Has 7 years experience.

There usually are some strings attached, like a work commitment for a certain amount of time or something. Unfortunately, I don't have any details yet but if I am offered this job that also means I will be getting a sign-on bonus. I was just curious if anyone else had any experience with this.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education. Has 35 years experience.

You can always ask for an agreement that will pro-rate the payback if you decide to leave before the contract termination. May as well give that a try.

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU. Has 30 years experience.

There usually are some strings attached, like a work commitment for a certain amount of time or something. Unfortunately, I don't have any details yet but if I am offered this job that also means I will be getting a sign-on bonus. I was just curious if anyone else had any experience with this.

Don't accept/sign on until you read it. Then you'll know what the deal is and if you want to take it.

Know what you're getting into because a "bonus" is usually an incentive to get someone to accept a difficult to fill position. An employer is looking after their needs not yours.

turnforthenurse, MSN, NP

Specializes in ER, progressive care. Has 7 years experience.

Don't accept/sign on until you read it. Then you'll know what the deal is and if you want to take it.

Know what you're getting into because a "bonus" is usually an incentive to get someone to accept a difficult to fill position. An employer is looking after their needs not yours.

I have no intention of accepting the bonus before I read the contract. What I want to know is, does it look bad to your potential employer if you do not accept the bonus?

I like to look at it either way...a sign-on bonus could mean awful working conditions or as you stated, a difficult to fill position. It could also be that the organization is trying to gain a competitive edge on others in the area. We'll see.

Mavrick, BSN, RN

Specializes in 15 years in ICU, 22 years in PACU. Has 30 years experience.

I have no intention of accepting the bonus before I read the contract. What I want to know is, does it look bad to your potential employer if you do not accept the bonus?

I like to look at it either way...a sign-on bonus could mean awful working conditions or as you stated, a difficult to fill position. It could also be that the organization is trying to gain a competitive edge on others in the area. We'll see.

Good question. I'd find out. By not accepting the bonus, would you still have to abide by all the conditions that the employer would expect of you if you DID take the bonus? Such as a length of stay commitment or floating assignments, whatever.

A competitive edge is needed when there is a shortage of qualified workers. Is that the case in your area? Are there enough experienced RNs not just new grads?

Perhaps I should have asked this first. What about not accepting a bonus would make you look bad? I don't follow what your fear is.

turnforthenurse, MSN, NP

Specializes in ER, progressive care. Has 7 years experience.

Good question. I'd find out. By not accepting the bonus, would you still have to abide by all the conditions that the employer would expect of you if you DID take the bonus?

That's actually a very good question and I didn't even think of that -definitely something I am going to ask in my interview.

Kind of going with that question...usually sign-on bonuses require a certain length of commitment to the company. If I decide to forgo the bonus and not sign the contract (and say that I do not have to abide by the conditions), would that possibly suggest that I do not plan on staying with the company long-term?

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 19 years experience.

Interesting question. I've never heard of anybody declining a sign on bonus. We are offering one now, the way it works is the first installment is paid after the 90 day probationary period, the rest is paid in increments at 6 months, 9 months and 12 months of employment. As the bonus is paid out in quarterly increments instead of all at once it is tied to length of employment but if you leave before the full bonus is paid you are not required to pay back the portion you've already received since that was considered earned by the time worked that quarter.

When I graduated nursing school ('02) I was offered a $3500 sign on bonus. I told them I didn't want it because I didn't know how long I was going to work. She insisted I take it and said if you don't stay, you can pay it back. I'm glad I took it, I stayed 10 years and only left to take care of my husband who is ill. They paid half at sign on and the second half after a year. They weren't going to pay the second half because I didn't stay on the floor that I started on, I wanted to float. But after I did a sales job on them they agreed to pay it. So if you can just put it aside and spend it when your year (or however long they deem necessary) is up.

FolksBtrippin, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psychiatry, Pediatrics, Public Health.

Don't fear the sign on bonus. Slavery is still illegal (for now). Count your blessings and take it. Yes, I think it might look bad to your employer, because it makes you look :confused: But that's not the reason I think you should take it.

Sign on bonuses are a good sign for nurses. Positions are difficult to fill when they are in high demand. Yes, Virginia, there is a nursing shortage.

Now please, don't be so convinced that its a terrible job market that you neglect to take your sign on bonus.