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Should a recent RN grad be a supervisor in LTC?

desro1986 desro1986 (New) New

Hello. I have been working as a part time floor RN in a LTC & rehab facility for almost five months now. I have been asked on a few occasions to fill in for supervisors when they need the day off. Sometimes I say I just have plans, but the real reason I choose not to work is because I do not feel comfortable being a supervisor. I don't feel that I have enough experience behind me in order to be a good supervisor. I am still lacking some nursing skills e.g IV's and trach care etc. and fear that I might not know what to do in an emergency situation. Is it normal to feel this way? Is it a valid reason not to supervise? Do you think my place of employment will think this is acceptable?

southernbelle08

Has 8 years experience. Specializes in Oncology, Med-Surg, Nursery.

Of course this is just my opinion, but I would not do it either.

It has been my experience, that when something is going wrong, most of the time you are going to look to the person in charge for help. On dayshift the manager is usually on the floor. At night, I know we always got our charge nurse involved in sticky situations. So you have to ask yourself if someone came to you for help, would you be ready/able to step in and help? I think there is probably a reason you are having doubts, and I know it is always best to go with your gut. If you feel like you don't have enough experience to do such a job, then most likely you do not.

Don't feel bad. I have been a nurse nearly two years and I still wouldn't want the job! I am sure your facility would understand. If they didn't understand you being honest (and by being honest in this way - that is putting the safety of patients first), then that is clearly their problem. Remember, your patients comes first and next is you. If something goes wrong - it will be YOU that has to deal with whatever happens to the patient and also whatever happens to you as a result of it. Protect your patients & yourself is what I say.

I don't say any of that to scare you! I'm only saying what I would pray someone would say to me in the same situation.

:)

Jules A, MSN

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

I think it depends on the recent grad. I work with one that is excellent and one that after 5 months still can't get off orientation. It sounds like you are unsure and fwiw I'm not a fan of being in charge ever so you may want to pass this time. Congratulations on the offer though it is a nice compliment to their confidence in your skills as a nurse.

mustlovepoodles, RN

Specializes in OB/GYN, Peds, School Nurse, DD.

I would think not. I agree with southernbelle. I think the charge nurse needs to really be on top of her game, because they are IN CHARGE of making everything run right. I don't think a recent grad has nearly the experience to be a proper resource. You are completely within bounds to tell your employer that you do not feel qualified at this time to take charge. If you let them bully you into doing it, you will be in for some high anxiety and possibly dangerous moments.

Ace587RN, RN

Specializes in ED.

I was offered the same. They told me that theyll train me, but in the end i think they would train me for a WHILE to get actually get me up to speed. So i refused

i was offered a similar position and i have just over a year of experience as an rn. i thought it was risky, how much more for you?? if anything goes wrong, you will be the go-to person and will call the shots. without really shooting down the offer, i said i do not feel comfortable yet about handling such a big responsibility and will need further exposure. i said i will need more time. nobody can force you to take on something that you think you aren't capable yet of doing. it's your license at stake.

You're being asked because you have the magical RN after your name and if an RN isn't scheduled the DON has to show up for certain things that LPNs can't sign off.

Don't do it.

You're being asked because you have the magical RN after your name and if an RN isn't scheduled the DON has to show up for certain things that LPNs can't sign off.

Don't do it.

Hi SuesquatchRN, I recently got offered for a RN supervisor position, part time 2nd shift. I am kind of iffy about it because I am a new grad. I am writing down a list of questions I want to ask the DON before I start my orientation. I am willing to learn, but I just got discouraged by reading the posts here.

So I was wondering when you said "certain things the LPNs can't sign off", what are you referring to?

what are the usual emergency situations that have happened?

Thank you in advance. I am still deciding..

Agree with Sue on this one. The places where I have worked have hired new grad RNs and placed them in supervisory roles right out of school. Given no choice in the matter, the new nurses would sink or swim. Many of them survived just long enough to find jobs elsewhere, then out the door they went. Do what you feel you must. I do not think you would be fired if you approached your manager and talked about your misgivings. They should work with you on this and approach you again, when you feel better prepared, after maybe a year or 15 months, or eight months, on the job. Good luck.

Agree with Sue on this one. The places where I have worked have hired new grad RNs and placed them in supervisory roles right out of school. Given no choice in the matter, the new nurses would sink or swim. Many of them survived just long enough to find jobs elsewhere, then out the door they went. Do what you feel you must. I do not think you would be fired if you approached your manager and talked about your misgivings. They should work with you on this and approach you again, when you feel better prepared, after maybe a year or 15 months, or eight months, on the job. Good luck.

Thank you caliotter3. :)

I think I will take the offer (part time), and see how it goes. I think it's a very good opportunity. I understand it won't be easy, but I am gonna put 100% into it and learn from them. If I really feel I am lacking some skills, I won't be afraid to approach my manager about my concerns. After all, it's my license and people's lives!

BTW, I also (havent signed) got an offer at another LTC for a RN postion. (not sure PT or FT) It seems like you have experience at LTC for awhile. I was wondering if you could share your experience with me/us. Things to expect, etc.

Thanks again :) !

Things LPNs can't do in NYS nursing homes:

Pretty much nothing with IVs except flush.

Assess after a fall.

Sign off on new admissions.

Any care planning.

Pronounce death.

Wound documentation for state survey purposes.

MDS since some is subjective and involves assessment.

The big downfall to being new and supervisory is that esp. with the geriatric population a crash can come really quickly. A UTI that had you or me calling the doc stat for ABX just has the old one a little more confused. Then, WHAM! Sepsis.

It isn't your skills that will be a problem. You know how to do all the technical nurse stuff done in LTC. You do not have the experience to know when someone is going bad, whether death is creeping up on someone, that stuff.

Go into the Geriatric forum. There's a LOT of information in there. Bump the threads that interest you and those of us who frequent that forum will be happy to fill in the gaps.

:)

thank you.

So yea, after reading numerous threats regarding this situation from expereinced nurses. I think I am going to turn the offer down.

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