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Should I take a job with more opportunity but an unprofessional manager?

Nurses   (2,055 Views 24 Comments)
by NurseRotten NurseRotten (Member)

1,988 Profile Views; 71 Posts

Recently, I was recruited by a former director to move to a different hospital where I could gain valuable experience as a charge nurse and prepare myself for nursing administration (possibly house supervisor in 3-5 years). I met with the Nursing Supervisor for my first interview, and I was absolutely flabbergasted by the lack of professionalism. In the interview, the manager used foul language in reference to some of the nurses, discussed her moral beliefs and talked about her intolerance for people who are overweight.

The director, who I know and trust from a previous job, says that she is trying to "clean up the place" and weed out the bad ones. She warned me before interviewing that the hospital is going through some growing pains, and she assured me that if I could stick it out, I would have the opportunity to be on the forefront of leading the changes. (Sounds great right?)

The hospital has serious recruiting issues (imagine that) and employs mostly agency nurses (about 90%). Again, this is something I was warned of and promised would change.

Should I go there for the opportunity and experience, or stay with my hospital as a staff nurse? I love the job I am at currently. I have been recognized a number of times for my contributions there. I have some room for growth, but the growth would take a number of years because of the wealth of seasoned nurses they have retained over the years.

I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO. I am hoping that you guys can help me think of this in different ways that might change my perspective. Have you ever taken a big risk like this before? How did it work out?

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kmblue39 has 9 years experience and specializes in Orthopedic/General Surgery.

22 Posts; 1,262 Profile Views

hmmmmm, stay at the old place with a wealth of seasoned nurses (so good that no one will leave) or go to the new place with 90% agency nurses (so bad that they can't get anyone to work there as full-time staff).

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UM Review RN is a ASN, RN and specializes in Utilization Management.

7 Articles; 5,163 Posts; 27,502 Profile Views

I'd stick where you are. Nothing, nothing, nothing can compensate you for the headaches of trying to swim upstream in a place that's trying to "change."

Your first Charge experience will be with 90% agency nurses? That tells you that there is no real "team" in place for you to depend on when the going gets tough. You're not familiar with each of them and their strengths and weaknesses, and you don't see them often enough to be able to put together a good team. That'd be true of any new employee, but think about it-- you're coming in as both a new employee and Charge, under a UM that you already aren't clicking with, and who probably won't give a flying fig about helping you with this assignment.

Think about it, long and hard.

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6,372 Posts; 34,514 Profile Views

If you had ever worked in a poorly-managed, dysfunctional setting, you would not be asking this question.

I have no doubt that the director is sincere in her desire to see you learn a charge role and possibly advance into a management position, but with the entire facility is in such upheaval, promises are not likely to be kept.

Stay put!

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832 Posts; 7,299 Profile Views

if you had ever worked in a poorly-managed, dysfunctional setting, you would not be asking this question.

i have no doubt that the director is sincere in her desire to see you learn a charge role and possibly advance into a management position, but with the entire facility is in such upheaval, promises are not likely to be kept.

stay put!

amen, sistah!

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TheCommuter has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

1 Follower; 228 Articles; 27,607 Posts; 316,722 Profile Views

An unprofessional nurse manager can cause your life to be an utter living hell at work. I would not want to work under such a person.

In addition, Houston has been one of the 'fattest' cities in America for the past 4 out of 5 years. Therefore, much of her workforce will be overweight, whether she likes it or not.

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71 Posts; 1,988 Profile Views

Thanks for all your comments.

I called a family friend who is a nursing director in another city that has been sort of a mentor to me over the past few years. She recommended that I keep my employee status with my current employer but change, perhaps, to PRN or Supplemental. Then tell the director at the new place that I will try it for 90 days to see if it will be a good match. That will allow me to keep the position at the hospital I currently work for while trying out the a new experience. It will allow me to reduce my risks (Have my cake and eat it too).

Anybody try that before???

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71 Posts; 1,988 Profile Views

hmmmmm, stay at the old place with a wealth of seasoned nurses (so good that no one will leave) or go to the new place with 90% agency nurses (so bad that they can't get anyone to work there as full-time staff).

I guess the decision seems rather obvious when you put it that way!!!!!!!!

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walk6miles specializes in ICU of all kinds, CVICU, Cath Lab, ER..

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Stay, stay, and STAY where you are... you are not going to find that pot of gold at the end of a rainbow, especially when the rainbow is nothing more than a prop on a stage set for disaster. You want to be house supervisor? You could probably do that where you are in just the same amount of time.

I speak from experience - I followed a friend to the promised land and I am paying dearly, dearly, and more dearly for it!

Never mind a "90 day trial".... you will see the mess you avoided from your safe place. The changes that need to be made to make the place professional will come but only after tons of problems, accusations, and just plain nastiness.

Forewarned is fore armed!!

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gr8rnpjt has 38 years experience as a RN and specializes in Case Management.

737 Posts; 6,777 Profile Views

If you had ever worked in a poorly-managed, dysfunctional setting, you would not be asking this question.

I have no doubt that the director is sincere in her desire to see you learn a charge role and possibly advance into a management position, but with the entire facility is in such upheaval, promises are not likely to be kept.

Stay put!

Thats a big DITTO!!!!!

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Trophywife81 specializes in Med-Surg, gynecology.

88 Posts; 3,196 Profile Views

Although I am not a nurse (yet), I come from an education background, which produces its own kind of hell....an unprofessional manager will cause your life to be utterly miserable. I speak from experience!

No amount of incentives, money, recognition, etc. can compensate for a poor manager. I myself tried to make it work, only to quit a toxic workplace (caused by my supervisor) after only 6 months. Save your sanity.

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DanEMT is a ASN, RN and specializes in ED.

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Quote

The director, who I know and trust from a previous job, says that she is trying to "clean up the place" and weed out the bad ones. She warned me before interviewing that the hospital is going through some growing pains, and she assured me that if I could stick it out, I would have the opportunity to be on the forefront of leading the changes. (Sounds great right?)

Let me tell you this, any any job that promises being on the forefront after a serious change is a disaster waiting to happen. Don't do it. Being in business for many years I have seen this happen again and again, mgt and the problem doesn't change, only the staff. Wait for the right opportunity.

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