Rules regarding Training at work.

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I'm training right now at a job. Not only am I new there, but I'm also a new grad. Is it ok for the nurse training me to dump a hard patient on me and then leave me? I didn't take any break/lunch, and I also stayed an hour after the time I was supposed to be off. She left as soon as our shift was over! I understand that I'm licensed, but is it ok for her to dump a pt on me who required special attention and then leave me there??

pagandeva2000, LPN

7,984 Posts

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

I believe she should have remained to assist you. The next time this occurs, report it to the charge nurse and request assistance. Unfortunately, this is not new or unusual...especially if they have a high turnover of nurses coming to that particular facility. I am not defending their behavior at all, but you will see as time rolls on that many times, people are not paid to precept and this causes major problems. What happens is that the person precepting may also still have the same workload as if she were alone, and precepting slows people down. Again, let me repeat, this does not make their attitudes acceptable. I find it to be a part of nursing burnout, which doesn't make it easier for the new grad walking in to the scene. I think that the entire nursing career needs to be revamped to avoid issues like this...the new grads should be welcomed, and the incumbant nurses should generally want to embrace newcomers and share their knowledge.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

226 Articles; 27,608 Posts

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 17 years experience.

I've noticed that you've titled this discussion "Rules regarding training at work."

If you're looking for some training rules to be set in stone, you're probably out of luck. Facilities often create and implement their own rules on training new employees, and they often don't follow these rules.

When I was a new grad at my very first nursing job, I was promised 3 days of orientation on the floor. I ended up receiving only 1 day before being cut loose to work on my own.

Jules A, MSN

8,863 Posts

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner.

Sadly its been my experience that orientation isn't always what one might expect. Mine was very brief due to shortages in staff, what else is new? What I can share from my experience is that while asking for advice and help when needed is advisable, complaining about the lack of adequate orientation seems to come off as not being a team player. Not fair I know but it is what I've seen at my facility more than once. Personally I figured I'd step up and just do the best I could and if I was making mistakes someone would tell me and I'd have to make adjustments. Hang in there and remember that so much of what we do is learned as we go along.

pagandeva2000, LPN

7,984 Posts

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

It is unfortunate, but nursing is not an embracing career. We are all left out there too early for comfort, but due to the high patient volume and high turnover of nurses, there simply isn't time. I am convinced that the majority of critical thinking in nursing in the real world is simply to survive over the madness.

josinda421

343 Posts

Specializes in Geriatrics.
It is unfortunate, but nursing is not an embracing career. We are all left out there too early for comfort, but due to the high patient volume and high turnover of nurses, there simply isn't time. I am convinced that the majority of critical thinking in nursing in the real world is simply to survive over the madness.

That is soooo true. I've come to find out nursing is not all I thougt it would be.

caliotter3

38,333 Posts

My orientation period at LTC facilities consisted of a week of hearing a lot of negativity about the job as much as info about how to do the job. All they ever talked about was negativity. I got sick of it soon and learned to just brush it aside. Some people wouldn't answer my questions. I took my questions to those who were the supervisors or those who were positive. I asked those who were positive to help me if I needed it. This nurse is giving you unspoken acknowledgement that she is not one you should go out of your way to approach for help. Go to your supervisor with your concerns. You don't have to accuse the other nurse of anything. Just be truthful if asked. Your supervisor will get the message that your preceptor is not being helpful.

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