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WannaBeNurse1999 WannaBeNurse1999 (New Member)

RN to BSN process vs BSN

Pre-Nursing   (983 Views 16 Comments)
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Hi all,

(Backstory) I am currently a sophomore at my university. My school has a 2 year nursing program, I have a 3.5 GPA and I am currently passing my classes.. I am use to making A's and these C's are making me insecure. I feel as though my university is making our pre-requisites waaaaay more difficult than it should be. I had to take A&P II at a local technical college during the summer of 2018, and it was so amazing. The professors actually wanted you to understand, and they did everything possible to make sure that you did so. And I loved that hands on approach, compared to me asking questions and being told "Read the lab manual." Although I am so close to getting into nursing school at my university... I am over it. But I don't want my university to ruin nursing for me. If I transfer to another university, there's a chance that almost all of my sciences (A&P 1, Chem, Patho, & Micro) won't transfer. Our textbooks and courses were modified for and by my professors at my school. They told us that their classes most likely won't transfer to another school before starting classes, but I never imagined how lousy my professors would be.

(Question) Is there really a significant difference between going the RN to BSN route? Do you guys think it is easier than getting a BSN straight through? Are the RN and BSN NCLEX exams similar, or totally different (knowledge wise)? If I take additional classes over the summer, would I be back on track to graduate with my classmates (Spring 2021)?

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Well, first off, have you researched your university's program? Talked to current and previous nursing students? Unless your first A&P professor is part of the nursing program and has control over the atmosphere, their class isn't necessarily indicative of what the nursing program is like. In the colleges I've went to, there have been good professors and bad ones, often in the exact same area of study. A good program still had several professors you wanted to avoid. I mean, it could still be a terrible program, but if you haven't, definitely do your research before deciding.

Either way, whether you get an ADN or a BSN, you take the exact same NCLEX to get your RN license since both programs have the core nursing science courses/info. The RN to BSN programs generally just consist of the "fluffy" courses like ethics or leadership and courses like nursing research, and they can be done online while you are working as an RN. It's certainly a viable option. However, if another university wouldn't transfer your credits, I'm unsure why a community college would? Or is there some type of agreement that allows you to transfer credits to a specific college?

And I can't really help you on when you'd graduate. It'd depend on your acceptance, when the program takes in new students, how long the specific program is, etc.

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Hi, I know that getting an ADN involves a two year program. And I can get go the RN to BSN route in 2-3 semesters. What I'm asking is, what's the difference? It seems as though you can get your BSN in 3 years, compared to going to a 4 year university like I am. Because if so, wouldn't it make sense for everyone to choose the 3 year route?

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I honestly don't think there's actually much of a difference in the way of quality and result. You get the same degree in the end and you get the same education. Well, other than ADNs (and I'm assuming Rn to BSN programs) usually being cheaper.

I'd assume that, for some, it may be that their local ADN program has a massive waiting list while the BSN doesn't. I've heard of some people having to wait a year or two to actually get off the waiting list and start the ADN program because so many people are applying. ADN programs can also be more competitive as a result of the number of applicants.

Otherwise, it might be more about people, specifically young adults, wanting the "college experience" or wanting to start off getting to explore more of their options before deciding on a certain path. If you go straight for an ADN, you have to decide sooner that you want to definitely go into nursing. That and there is now some freshmen admit BSN programs, so I imagine it's more comforting to know you're admitted before even paying and taking the prereqs.

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Hi, I know that getting an ADN involves a two year program. And I can get go the RN to BSN route in 2-3 semesters. What I'm asking is, what's the difference? It seems as though you can get your BSN in 3 years, compared to going to a 4 year university like I am. Because if so, wouldn't it make sense for everyone to choose the 3 year route?

In reality, ADN programs are usually 4 years. You typically must take 2 years worth of prerequisites before enrolling in the ADN program for two years. Then after the ADN, you spend another year or two bridging to BSN.

If you take a BSN program straight through, you typically do the prerequisites and general studies classes in your first two years and your nursing program in the last two years, but during that time you take a few more nursing classes, so you emerge with the BSN.

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Hi, I know that getting an ADN involves a two year program. And I can get go the RN to BSN route in 2-3 semesters. What I'm asking is, what's the difference? It seems as though you can get your BSN in 3 years, compared to going to a 4 year university like I am. Because if so, wouldn't it make sense for everyone to choose the 3 year route?

Well, no. The RN-BSN route is a longer route to obtain a BSN and takes longer than 3 years. ADN programs are 2 years AFTER you've completed about 2 years of pre-reqs. So you end up spending the same amount of time getting an Associate's as you would on a pre-licensure BSN.

There is no such thing as an ADN NCLEX and a BSN NCLEX. There is only NCLEX-RN and NCLEX-LPN. ADN and BSN graduates alike take the same NCLEX-RN exam.

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Hi all,

(Backstory) I am currently a sophomore at my university. My school has a 2 year nursing program, I have a 3.5 GPA and I am currently passing my classes.. I am use to making A's and these C's are making me insecure. I feel as though my university is making our pre-requisites waaaaay more difficult than it should be. I had to take A&P II at a local technical college during the summer of 2018, and it was so amazing. The professors actually wanted you to understand, and they did everything possible to make sure that you did so. And I loved that hands on approach, compared to me asking questions and being told "Read the lab manual." Although I am so close to getting into nursing school at my university... I am over it. But I don't want my university to ruin nursing for me. If I transfer to another university, there's a chance that almost all of my sciences (A&P 1, Chem, Patho, & Micro) won't transfer. Our textbooks and courses were modified for and by my professors at my school. They told us that their classes most likely won't transfer to another school before starting classes, but I never imagined how lousy my professors would be.

(Question) Is there really a significant difference between going the RN to BSN route? Do you guys think it is easier than getting a BSN straight through? Are the RN and BSN NCLEX exams similar, or totally different (knowledge wise)? If I take additional classes over the summer, would I be back on track to graduate with my classmates (Spring 2021)?

Re: being on track to graduate with your classmates, you need to talk to a counselor at your University. Also, just because you don't care for an instructor or two, does not mean you should punish yourself by transferring to another school, and therefore having to re-take pre-reqs. All paths to becoming an RN are incredibly difficult, whether you do an Associate's or BSN program. You have to decide which path works best for your life situation.

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The curriculums are the same, just on a different timeline.

People straight out of high school tend to gravitate to the BSN programs, especially if they have any kind of financial help, while those that are non-traditional students (*hand raise*) tend to bridge more so that we can start working faster. Granted there are certainly other variables such as what type of programs are in your area, competitiveness, etc. Some LPN or ADN programs have different/more prereqs than others but you'll end up taking all of them at the BSN level anyway.

It is very easy to find programs where you can bridge RN to BSN that are fully online, making it much easier to work and go to school fulltime than if you are attempting to work FT while taking traditional classes and clinicals FT as well. The classes in the RN to BSN bridge program aren't ones that I would consider to be helpful on the NCLEX because they're mostly administrative, research, ethics, etc so I don't feel like there's a disadvantage to taking the NCLEX after the ADN vs the BSN.

The only other differences are just facility and faculty specific.

Do be aware that there are some highly competitive/saturated locations where it's difficult to be employed with an ADN, that would be another thing to consider in your decision making.

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Doesn't hurt to ask an admissions counselor at another university. I might be super naive, but it sounds a wee bit sketchy that none of your sciences would transfer. I myself was a transfer student and I took classes at different universities during the summer and all my credits transferred (provided I got a high enough grade).

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My suggestion is to stick it out at the university you are enrolled in now. I am doing the ADN-RN route and it is time consuming and competitive. In total, it will take me 5 years to get my BSN and an additional year waiting for the Fall 19' program to start. If I had the money and the resources to have gone to a university straight from high school, I would have, but I had to go this route. Do yourself a favor and stay where you are!!!!

Also, it is very unlikely you will be able to get into an ADN program with C's in your sciences. Like I said it's very competitive. They want A's in most classes and you will have to take an assessment exam(TEAS), where you would need to score relatively high to even be considered into a program.

Edited by DNPDominguez

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Well, no. The RN-BSN route is a longer route to obtain a BSN and takes longer than 3 years. ADN programs are 2 years AFTER you've completed about 2 years of pre-reqs. So you end up spending the same amount of time getting an Associate's as you would on a pre-licensure BSN.

The RN-BSN is not necessarily longer. I got into my BSN program two months after I graduated from my ADN program. I planned ahead and I was in contact with my prospective school months before I graduated. That meant knowing what classes would transfer and what classes I needed to take to graduate from the BSN program. I am doubling up on classes and so I am on track to graduate in 7 months. It depends on how much research you do into your prospective program and how quickly you can take the classes you need to graduate.

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Hi, during orientation they said that they would take other universities credits, but the other universities tended to not take ours. Our science textbooks and lab manuals had to be bought from the bookstore, where they read "Modified for and by our school name." It just sucks because I don't want to take everything over. And my advisor said that she would rather me change my major, than have to start over at another school.

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