advantages of BSN vs. ADN - page 3

Hi, considering that I am very new to all of this, I would appreciate any imput from you all. I am just entering my first semester of an ADN program, and would like to go on to the RN to BSN... Read More

  1. by   nursemike
    Quote from katiebugg
    Yes, I did check them out, and thank you very much...they are helpful. I will not become discouraged and leave...I love this place. Everybody has an opinion... that should be respected. Thanks for all of your help!!!
    No offense intended. In fact, I love the lively debates, and I truly think they have helped me in school. I'm in an ADN program, now, but it also has a BSN program. It's actually a 2+2: even if you plan from the start to get the BSN, you have to get the ADN first. I'll most likely do that, but I plan to work a year or two, first. Next time I go to nursing school, I want to know what I need to learn.
  2. by   manna
    Quote from tvccrn
    If that's the way they teach BSN students, then I hope any time my family or myself is in the hospital I have an ADN for my nurse.
    I think it would be wise for all of us to remember to not make any widespread judgments about any particular class of nurses based on a very small segment of that population. Works both ways.
  3. by   actioncat
    Quote from manna
    I think it would be wise for all of us to remember to not make any widespread judgments about any particular class of nurses based on a very small segment of that population. Works both ways.
    Thanks.
    Honestly, do you really believe that all (or most) BSN degree holders don't know what the antecubital area is or are unfamiliar with the term "edematous"?
  4. by   tvccrn
    Straight out of the gate....Yes I do believe that.

    After a few years on the floor, no.

    I have not found my ADN to be a hinderence in my career. I have moved up from floor nursing to peds ICU nursing to cath lab nursing and now I am in nursing infomatics. In every case, I was judged on my abilities, not my degree. I know that there are times when the education can make a difference, but I haven't found it yet.
  5. by   mickeymouse1205
    These replies are ridiculous, and you wonder why Dr's think they are Gods, they probably read posts like these. Ya know what I dont care what intials are after your name, be a student of your business, learn something new everyday while you are at work. That is where the REAL education comes from. Who here thinks they knew didly squat when they graduated from any nursing program? What is the first thing most preceptors told you, the first day on the job? "Forget what you learned in school, this is the real nursing world, were you have more than 1 or 2 patients" Stop degrading each other.
    Cheryl
  6. by   Q.
    Quote from vortex72
    I
    I'm going for my BSN now. Honestly, I could give a crap less about all the gay, useless courses I'll have to take to get my BSN (statistics, nursing "management" etc) They are a waste of time for actual practice.
    Interesting. I actually find these courses essential for actual practice.
  7. by   katiebugg
    Quote from nursemike?
    No offense intended. In fact, I love the lively debates, and I truly think they have helped me in school. I'm in an ADN program, now, but it also has a BSN program. It's actually a 2+2: even if you plan from the start to get the BSN, you have to get the ADN first. I'll most likely do that, but I plan to work a year or two, first. Next time I go to nursing school, I want to know what I need to learn.
    No offense taken.
  8. by   nursbee04
    Quote from mitchsmom
    Actually, the guy may have seen this:

    Study: Nurses' Education Affects Death Rates
    https://allnurses.com/forums/showthr...threadid=87225
    Wow, my unit has no BSNs, that must be why our patients are dropping like flies!
    That article is SO biased! There are so many things they did not factor into the study, and look at where the article was published - JAMA.

    Did they look at average experience level of nurse, average age of patient, nurse to patient ratios, average acuity? How many of those nurses had ACLS? How many were new grads? What was the average size of unit/hospital? I'm sorry, but you CANNOT TEACH critical thinking. And yet everytime someone questions an ADN's education level, that article is inevitably used as a cornerstone of the BSN debate.

    Katiebug, I hope you are able to find the best avenue for you, and I hope that when you become a nurse you will remember that all of your fellow nurses (LPN, ADN, BSN, Diploma) are all nurses regardless of what initials follow their name, and deserve your respect as a fellow nurse. I am sure that when you are a nurse you will realize the value that EVERY nurse holds. Education is invaluable, and I encourage you go as far as you can! Good luck
  9. by   katiebugg
    Quote from nursbee04
    Wow, my unit has no BSNs, that must be why our patients are dropping like flies!
    That article is SO biased! There are so many things they did not factor into the study, and look at where the article was published - JAMA.

    Did they look at average experience level of nurse, average age of patient, nurse to patient ratios, average acuity? How many of those nurses had ACLS? How many were new grads? What was the average size of unit/hospital? I'm sorry, but you CANNOT TEACH critical thinking. And yet everytime someone questions an ADN's education level, that article is inevitably used as a cornerstone of the BSN debate.

    Katiebug, I hope you are able to find the best avenue for you, and I hope that when you become a nurse you will remember that all of your fellow nurses (LPN, ADN, BSN, Diploma) are all nurses regardless of what initials follow their name, and deserve your respect as a fellow nurse. I am sure that when you are a nurse you will realize the value that EVERY nurse holds. Education is invaluable, and I encourage you go as far as you can! Good luck
    Nursbee04, Thank you for the advice, graciously taken
  10. by   vortex72
    Quote from Q.
    Interesting. I actually find these courses essential for actual practice.
    If you find them essential, then you are probably a nurse manager or an educator. For actual clinical nursing, they are useless. I have no intention on being in management or education. Hell, I'm making considerably more $ than most NP's or NM's with my piddly RN diploma. Like I said, the only reason I'm getting my BSN is so I can get my CRNA or ACNP
  11. by   Niki79
    Quote from tmiller027
    According to my chemistry professor, ADNs are more likely to kill a patient than BSNs...so I guess my patients are in BIG trouble :chuckle
    Would this be Dr. Rod at BC?
  12. by   zenman
    Quote from rach_nc_03
    and, just a couple of words of advice: first, don't assume that people who haven't completed their nursing education are 'uneducated'. with the vast number of people entering nursing as a second, third, fourth career, there are plenty of people- myself included- coming into the field as well-educated adults.
    Anyone, in my opinion, who cannot recognize the value of education is "uneducated" regardless of how many careers they have or whether they have finished nursing school or not.

    second, if you are truly trying to enlighten the poster (or anyone else), a condescending tone is the fastest way to alienate someone.
    I think they may be beyond enlightenment, therefore I speak as I will. Course I do have a problem and little patience with "dumb."
  13. by   zenman
    Ok, I have a solution. Let nurses who only want to take nursing courses do so. Leave out all the useless crap. Let's do the same for engineers, lawyers, teachers, etc.. We can call you "trade school graduates." The ones who value and can even comprehend the value of education...we'll call you...let's see..."professionals."

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