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4 Reasons Ghosting an Employer is a Bad Idea

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Ghosting is a term usually used in online dating to describe "standing up" a date or connection. However, it's been used in the job market when employees disappear from the application process, interviews, or even on-the-job. Learn four reasons ghosting is a bad idea and a few strategies to use when you want to ghost an employer. You are reading page 2 of 4 Reasons Ghosting an Employer is a Bad Idea. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

I’ve sometimes wanted to do this when I worked in places that seemed like hell, but I didn’t. I just quickly got myself another job, resigned (sometimes by email), worked my notice,  then left. No muss no fuss. It really doesn’t pay to burn bridges in nursing. If the place is really bad, document everything and keep it safe in case they try and blame you later for anything going wrong. Cya. 

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There is room for improvement all the way around. I made mistakes as a younger nurse that I wouldn't repeat, none of them were 'ghosting.' But, still some were based on emotions and not knowing how to handle certain situations with coworkers. I honestly think each nursing program should incorporate a class on dealing with fellow employees. Nothing but age can prepare a human being ( what nurses are, despite what we think ) on how to deal with other nurses who seem to delight in their uncomfortability. We ooze compassion and professionalism in the patient rooms, it's often dog eat dog in the nurses station.

As I have aged, I see it for what it is. A miserable individual attempting to spread the disease. But, as a young nurse, I took it on and thought it was about me. Now, I see it as cowardice. I'm mean really, what are they going to do, kill me?

But my point is, it still hurts everyone. Yes, the nurse who ghosts will suffer. But, so will the nurses left to pick up the pieces. Managers often fail to address the attitudes of nurse bullies, simply because they show up. Great, you have a reliable *******. My bet is for every nurse who 'ghosts,' there's a stalwart shithead giving them a shove out the door. Just my two cents... 

Want your relief to be there, make it a place they want to be. This is not directed at the patient care aspect of the job, without patients we have no job. But, adequate staffing helps too. All behavior is motivated... Instead of focusing on ghosting, focus on why nurses even think ghosting is a solution. They want to make some feeling stop. What feeling? Why are they having the feeling? Watch, listen for what's left out. Snitches get stitches in nursing too. Rat out your fellow nurses and you'll wind up on an island.... 

You know the answers already. 

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On 1/28/2019 at 5:27 PM, JadedCPN said:

No offense meant at all and truly not to take away from the actual content of the article, but I cringed when reading this title. It reminds me of parents who try to be cool by saying the "hip" new vocabulary and it just seems awkward and out of place. I think I'm getting too old.😖

JadedCPN - No offense taken at all! I hear you that sometimes trying to use the "hip" or new terms can feel a little odd. But, using the words that people search for online is very important when trying to get articles out there. So - I went with it! 🙂 

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37 minutes ago, Melissa Mills said:

JadedCPN - No offense taken at all! I hear you that sometimes trying to use the "hip" or new terms can feel a little odd. But, using the words that people search for online is very important when trying to get articles out there. So - I went with it! 🙂 

Well, I'm old and had never heard of this hip, new term until this thread. 

In the old days we called it a no show, or quit without notice. 

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In 20+ years I have seen this happen a handful of times. A few CNA's that walked off the job part way through a shift, co-workers assumed they went on break and they just never came back.  I don't think a single nurse has ever done that though. We've had nurses quit with no notice of course but at least they always made their intentions of not ever coming back clear, a couple of times very memorably with some shall we say quite colorful language involved!  

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Hello All,

 I have never ‘ghosted’, but I have worked whereas a co-worker went ‘ghost’.  I have been in nursing for over 20 years and seriously considering changing career path.  There are still some great accountable, responsible, and knowledgeable nurses, but working with some of the others types, gives nurses a not so good name.  

I have yet to see a great Nurse Manager, who really has leadership, managerial, or solving problems skills.  I still say patient care should be hospitals’ FIRST goal.  

I went from clinical nurse to a contract nurse because my co-workers would not speak up on behave of a guideline for safe nursing practice, the hospital would not follow.  Hummm, they created based on evidence base practice, yet they would not follow it, so who suffers,...The Patients.

And please don’t give me the budget, I have only seen one top management (CEO) take a pay cut, in my 20+ years.  Excuse my language, but if the top managements primarily focus is NOT patient care, it’s only a matter of time, it will spread down, ... so ‘ghost’ is one of the fruit from who’s running the place.  

Solution, ... return back to patient safety as their first priority, with there actions and not just lip service, ... CEO take a pay cut, add another nurse or two on an already understaff unit.  

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I had jobs in a different field than healthcare.  I always figured it was good to go without shooting flame or just walking away.  Once, my company was taken over by someone else & I decided pretty quickly to find another job.  I gave notice & they were pissed.  Some managers even tried to get me to go off at them by saying nasty stuff.  Probably so they could shove me out right then.  I resisted taking the bait.  These days, I have seen plenty of articles about employers putting job candidates through hell.  Things like long gaps in communication, then suddenly, be here in 5 minutes for another interview.  Surprise, surprise, the prospect gets a job elsewhere.  Companies who could treat people badly the last ten years are finding out that doesn't work now.

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