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Really Nervous about Everything. Should I reconsider nursing?

Students   (1,468 Views | 26 Replies)
by Kiroppi Kiroppi (New) New Pre-Student

267 Profile Views; 9 Posts

Hi guys, 

So I am a nursing student who has done her first Med Pass today. But now I am so worried, my patient needed insulin today. So when I was drawing up the insulin, my stupid self got nervous and slipped and got a NEEDLESTICK!! The thing is I wasn't wearing gloves, and my nurse didn't say anything about it. I was in the nurse's station when I was drawing up the medication. The needle was not used and it was clean. My nurse saw me stick myself, she said "it's a clean needle it's fine". I also informed my instructor and she said since it was a clean needle, I should not worry. However, I can't stop worrying. I wasn't wearing gloves when I was taking up the insulin but the needle was clean. I am so stressed and I feel like maybe I am not cut out to be a nurse. What do you guys think? What are your advice? Should I get my blood tested? Should I reconsider my career? 

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CharleeFoxtrot has 7 years experience as a ADN, RN.

602 Posts; 7,183 Profile Views

We can't give medical advice here, but if it was a clean needle why would you worry about getting your blood tested? Secondly, wearing gloves would not have protected you from the needlestick so while it's not a good practice in this instance it makes no difference. Lastly, FWIW, I did the exact same thing my first week 😒 and I'm still here so don't stress! Just remember the lesson here and take it into your daily practice 🙂

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SilverBells is a BSN and specializes in Rehab/Nurse Manager.

27 Posts; 415 Profile Views

One incident of messing up isn’t an indicator that you shouldn’t be a nurse.  It’s good to be conscious of your practice, but important to learn what is and is not significant.  As long as a new needle was used to administer the insulin to the patient, and proper dose was given, this seems like an accident to simply move on from.  

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

1 Follower; 6,490 Posts; 66,917 Profile Views

The type of "needlestick" you need to be concerned about is when the needle has already been used on the patient since that's the only way to potentially transfer a bloodborne pathogen from the patient to you.  

As for being nervous as a student nurse, that's healthy and shows you're aware of the potential risks in what we do, I'd be more concerned if you were never nervous.

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Orion81RN has 7 years experience.

863 Posts; 8,634 Profile Views

2 hours ago, CharleeFoxtrot said:

We can't give medical advice here, but if it was a clean needle why would you worry about getting your blood tested? Secondly, wearing gloves would not have protected you from the needlestick so while it's not a good practice in this instance it makes no difference. Lastly, FWIW, I did the exact same thing my first week 😒 and I'm still here so don't stress! Just remember the lesson here and take it into your daily practice 🙂

I'm curious why you say it's not good practice. There's no need for gloves for insulin administration.

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CharleeFoxtrot has 7 years experience as a ADN, RN.

602 Posts; 7,183 Profile Views

11 hours ago, Orion81RN said:

I'm curious why you say it's not good practice. There's no need for gloves for insulin administration.

Everywhere I worked it was policy as the CDC notes it is best practice whenever there is a chance of coming in contact with bloodbourne pathogens. Tons of research articles out there, this is the first one I grabbed via google.

https://www.cdc.gov/injectionsafety/blood-glucose-monitoring.html 

Quote

CDC:

Hand Hygiene (Hand washing with soap and water or use of an alcohol-based hand rub)

Wear gloves during blood glucose monitoring and during any other procedure that involves potential exposure to blood or body fluids.

Change gloves between patient contacts. Change gloves that have touched potentially blood-contaminated objects or fingerstick wounds before touching clean surfaces. Discard gloves in appropriate receptacles.

Perform hand hygiene immediately after removal of gloves and before touching other medical supplies intended for use on other persons.

 

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Orion81RN has 7 years experience.

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1 hour ago, CharleeFoxtrot said:

Everywhere I worked it was policy as the CDC notes it is best practice whenever there is a chance of coming in contact with bloodbourne pathogens. Tons of research articles out there, this is the first one I grabbed via google.

https://www.cdc.gov/injectionsafety/blood-glucose-monitoring.html 

 

Yes, I'm aware of the CDCs and OSHAs recommendations. I'm not usually anticipating coming into contact with blood giving insulin. Just like when I worked at an allergy office giving tons of shots back to back. No gloves.

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54 Posts; 890 Profile Views

Wait, the OP says "I was in the nurse's station when I was drawing up the medication."  I don't think you need to wear gloves to draw up insulin.  You will need to wear them when you administer it though.  And in your case, the needle hasn't touched anyone else yet besides yourself (and it was new), so don't worry about it.  Now, if you were to poke yourself, and then poke your preceptor, then your preceptor would/should be worried 🙂 (joking heh).  

Next time, take some deep breaths before dealing with needles to lessen your nerves, so that you won't hurt yourself again :).  You can also practice more in labs or at home too.

Edited by ppham

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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11 hours ago, CharleeFoxtrot said:

Everywhere I worked it was policy as the CDC notes it is best practice whenever there is a chance of coming in contact with bloodbourne pathogens. Tons of research articles out there, this is the first one I grabbed via google.

https://www.cdc.gov/injectionsafety/blood-glucose-monitoring.html 

 

The CDC recommends gloves for fingersticks (blood glucose monitoring) but not for insulin administrations.  Exposure to blood is likely during a fingerstick, but unlikely during insulin administration.

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Orion81RN has 7 years experience.

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I'm getting confused about the gloves comments. Probably because I worked at 2 allergy clinics where I'd give injections to 50 patients back to back. Never wore gloves. According to the CDC, OSHA, the WHO wearing gloves for injections is not necessary unless you anticipate blood. I do wear them to give heparin. 

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54 Posts; 890 Profile Views

Just now, Orion81RN said:

I'm getting confused about the gloves comments. Probably because I worked at 2 allergy clinics where I'd give injections to 50 patients back to back. Never wore gloves. According to the CDC, OSHA, the WHO wearing gloves for injections is not necessary unless you anticipate blood. I do wear them to give heparin. 

Well, recommendation means you don't legally have to.  So it's up to you really.  It's kinda of like teachers recommending nursing students to not work while in nursing school, but you know not everyone choose to do that (or can't afford to for some).  I mean it's just a recommendation.

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Orion81RN has 7 years experience.

863 Posts; 8,634 Profile Views

1 hour ago, ppham said:

Well, recommendation means you don't legally have to.  So it's up to you really.  It's kinda of like teachers recommending nursing students to not work while in nursing school, but you know not everyone choose to do that (or can't afford to for some).  I mean it's just a recommendation.

I get that. But I'm hearing nurses saying it's "bad practice." No, it's not. Its just your preference. At first I was asking bc I thought maybe they knew something I didn't. 

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