Jump to content

Realistic Goal?

SRNA   (1,041 Views | 10 Replies)
by mursedreaming mursedreaming (New) New Student

136 Profile Views; 3 Posts

Hey Everyone! 

I'm a current BSN student who is all set to graduate in May. I have applied to a few critical care units with some interviews coming up next month. I have huge dreams about attending CRNA school, but I have some doubts. Assuming I do as well as I have been during the last semester of school, I'll graduate with around a 3.42 cumulative GPA and a 2.8 science GPA. My first few years of college I bounced around between some schools and definitely was not as serious as I should have been about my grades. I never knew how intelligent I actually was until I started core nursing classes and found something that I am passionate about. 

So, with that being said, does anyone have any super great advice they would like to give me? I plan on taking some graduate level science courses just to show my prospective schools that I am serious about my education and willing to put in the extra work. I have such a fire in my belly about nursing, and especially nurse anesthesia.  I have shadowed twice and loved every minute of it. I am just worried that with my GPA being the way it is, most schools won't even look my way or give me the opportunity to interview and show them just how passionate I am about anesthesia. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TPN1986 is a RN and specializes in SRNA CEN CCRN-CMC.

79 Posts; 1,015 Profile Views

If you're serious consider retaking some of your undergraduate sciences that are pulling your GPA down. Maybe even consider taking a biochemistry course at some point. It's definitely an achievable goal. You will have to work very hard though. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Posts; 136 Profile Views

1 minute ago, TPN1986 said:

If you're serious consider retaking some of your undergraduate sciences that are pulling your GPA down. Maybe even consider taking a biochemistry course at some point. It's definitely an achievable goal. You will have to work very hard though. 

So you recommend taking undergraduate classes? Everyone else has been telling me that most schools prefer to see that you can hang at a graduate level.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Asherah has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in CICU/Trauma/Resuscitation.

743 Posts; 8,878 Profile Views

1 hour ago, mursedreaming said:

So you recommend taking undergraduate classes? Everyone else has been telling me that most schools prefer to see that you can hang at a graduate level.

You usually can't take graduate classes until you're done with your undergraduate coursework, and I definitely agree with @TPN1986's suggestion.  You can search and see from prior posts that we have both made that we are older students who speak from experience in terms of overcoming poor first degree/college course GPA.  I couldn't retake those specific courses at my prior four-year institution, however.  

I applaud you for setting your sights high, but I'd recommend focusing on finishing your last term (presumably) strong and trying to get a practicum/capstone/externship in a critical care setting.  

Edited by Asherah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

shanneliz123 has 3 years experience as a BSN and specializes in SRNA.

252 Posts; 2,738 Profile Views

Firstly, graduate from your current program and finish strong!  I didn’t have the best stats either. I made a post on what I did to make myself more appealing to CRNA programs and a study guide for the interview process if you want to take a look! I don’t think you’re out of the ballpark but you’ll definitely have to do some work once you’re employed to make yourself stand out. You don’t necessarily have to have outstanding statistics but you’ll have to show schools that it’s what you really want. Take a few grad courses if needed! It’ll help your GPA. It’s definitely not an unreasonable goal. Get certifications, make sure you’re on a unit that schools look for (CVICU, MSICU, level one trauma center, etc.) you’ll have to work hard but it’s not out of reach! I didn’t know if I’d get in either but I showed out in the interview and made myself as competitive as possible! I fortunately didn’t have to take grad courses but that would have been my next step if I didn’t get accepted. Good luck! 

 

Edited by shanneliz123

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Defibn' has 6 years experience as a RN, EMT-P and specializes in SRNA.

143 Posts; 2,180 Profile Views

15 hours ago, mursedreaming said:

So you recommend taking undergraduate classes? Everyone else has been telling me that most schools prefer to see that you can hang at a graduate level.

That all depends. If you took intro to chem and got a C, that will look real bad to an ADCOM. So you may want to take more undergrad chemistry and get A's. If you're going to take graduate classes, I would focus on science. There are some pathophys classes out there. However, if you got a C in undergrad a&p, it may be hard for you. If you then get a C in a graduate class, you have proven that can't hack it. I have no idea what your situation is, I'm just trying to give you some things to think about. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HappyCCRN1 is a BSN and specializes in Burn and Surgical/Trauma ICU.

50 Posts; 652 Profile Views

16 hours ago, mursedreaming said:

So you recommend taking undergraduate classes? Everyone else has been telling me that most schools prefer to see that you can hang at a graduate level.

As those state above, definitely retake the undergrad science courses that pulled your GPA down. And get A’s in them. Graduate courses would be great to make yourself more competitive down the line, but your first step really should be focused on the undergrad classes. That will get you up to an acceptable baseline GPA when you start applying. 
Next, get experience and get certified in the speciality you go into. Soak up every opportunity for learning on your unit. You need to get those sick patients. Once you’re there for a year, get involved with committees and research on your unit. 
Making the consideration that you have a good personal statement and resume, these are all stats that should get you to an interview. And from there, everyone is seriously on an even field and will have similar stats as you. So it’s all about trying to make yourself stand out in a sea of applicants that are just as qualified.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

loveanesthesia specializes in CRNA.

1 Follower; 785 Posts; 13,394 Profile Views

Agree, retake undergraduate chemistry, A&P and micro courses if you didn’t get an A. Contact programs that interest you and ask for their advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TPN1986 is a RN and specializes in SRNA CEN CCRN-CMC.

79 Posts; 1,015 Profile Views

On 12/22/2019 at 9:13 PM, mursedreaming said:

So you recommend taking undergraduate classes? Everyone else has been telling me that most schools prefer to see that you can hang at a graduate level.

They may be right but my personal experience has been that a high emphasis was placed on undergraduate sciences such as A&P, chemistry, micro, etc. Fortunately, I had A's in all of those classes so I didn't need to repeat any classes. If I was in your shoes I'd really consider retaking those sciences because you're going to be competing with other students who have earned A's in those classes. It's not something I would rush, I would focus on finishing your BSN off on a strong note and getting as close to all A's as you can. Once you graduate I'd slowly work on retaking some of those science classes perhaps even at a school that has a CRNA program you're considering applying too. I wouldnt rush taking the courses though and I would take them at a pace that would allow you to focus on getting A's. 

Applying to CRNA school for myself was kind of like a long journey, there isnt a perfect set path to walk that is going to guarantee you admission into any one program. I personally felt that my application experience was extremely competitive. I had to deal with being let down, being denied, wait listed and eventually accepted to multiple programs. During all of my applications though I continued working on becoming a stronger, smarter and better educated ICU nurse. I seized every opportunity to learn more about anesthesia including listening to podcasts, shadowing, certifications, graduate level classes, and attending the local anesthesia conference specific to my state to network. 

Retaking chemistry or microbiology to get a better grade is probably a pain in the *** and I get it, but you should honestly look at it as an opportunity to learn and better understand concepts that you hadnt fully mastered previously. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

tacticool has 3 years experience and specializes in BSN, RN-BC, NREMT, EMT-P, TCRN.

343 Posts; 3,825 Profile Views

Hey, Nurse! Look at the local hospitals and see if they have a New Grad or Nurse Residency Program. Some of our local hospitals have them with a few seats for ED or CCU/ICU. Good luck! Start with this, get experience and then look at CRNA.

PS- NCLEX is easy!

Edited by tacticool
Addition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alwayslearning258 is a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

27 Posts; 342 Profile Views

I was in the same boat as you. I knew I wanted this since high school but didn’t take things seriously enough at first. Graduated nursing with a 3.42. I’ll add a link to another post where you’ll see what I did and got in to my dream school!

Also took a grad level stats class and got a 4.0 which helped!

 

Edited by Alwayslearning258

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.