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Reading list, suggestions please

Posted

I have roughly a year before the direct entry BSN/MSN 18 month program I have been admitted to will start. I would LOVE suggestions on what to read beforehand so I can take *some* of the edge off such an accelerated program.

Here’s what I have read already / *am reading now:

  • Biology, by Campbell
  • Microbiology, by Prescott
  • Anatomy & Physiology, by Seeley
  • Clinically Oriented Anatomy, by Moore *
  • Pathophysiology, by Porth *
  • General Chemistry, by Gammon
  • Organic Chemistry, by Klein *
  • Principles of Biochemistry, by Lehninger *
  • Basic and Clinical Pharmacology, by Katzung *
  • Abnormal Psychology, by Barlow *
  • Development Through the Lifespan, Berk *

I have no clue where to start on books about nursing theory / fundamentals. Most of the above was either required by prerequisites, or seemed to me to be a good idea.

Edited by anewmanx

This exactly what I am looking for to prepare for my future, thank you so much

11 minutes ago, lumborum said:

This exactly what I am looking for to prepare for my future, thank you so much

Mind you, this might be overkill and I’m strongly considering going back to university for medical school prerequisites. I’m finding I strongly love the sciences.

abebooks.com is a great place to get older editions of these books for next to nothing.

Edited by damianus

I am really doing medical school but it is crucial to me if I don’t have any support. So I decided to have BSN first and my situation become better, I will go to med school.

12 minutes ago, lumborum said:

I am really doing medical school but it is crucial to me if I don’t have any support. So I decided to have BSN first and my situation become better, I will go to med school.

I’m hedging my bets as well. Different situation as I’m older with a family. If I don’t do well enough on prerequisites to get into my target medical school(s) I’ll proceed with the direct entry MSN and then go NP in either psych or neonatology.

I’d like to add to the above list this book:

"How the immune system works", by Sompayrac, Lauren M.

I plan on reading it after all the others. I’ve read it is a great primer on immunology.

Also, I am a non native speaker, do you know any books that I can read to prepare for my skills to writing research paper ?! I would really appreciate

As you mentioned about psych and neonatology, do you know how I can do get more opportunities in that field ?!

6 minutes ago, lumborum said:

As you mentioned about psych and neonatology, do you know how I can do get more opportunities in that field ?!

Become an RN, get a masters of science in nursing, get the requisite experience working in those fields (usually 1 year RN for psych, 2 years level III+ NICU for neonatology), then pursue a post masters nurse practitioner certificate in that field. Alternatively apply to a masters of science in nursing with an incorporated specialty.

Edited by damianus

well, thank you so much 🙂

BeatsPerMinute, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac. Has 5 years experience.

On 7/4/2020 at 3:11 AM, lumborum said:

As you mentioned about psych and neonatology, do you know how I can do get more opportunities in that field ?!

Answering both questions 🙂

I cannot say I have had your exact experience - the closest thing is to trying to learn a new language (Spanish, German, Sign Language, Japanese .. all with mixed results, ha). Everyones learning style is different. For me it is more effective to learn a new language if I mix all medias and do a little of each: reading, writing, listening, practice speaking. It all helps and reinforces the process of learning a language! Be OK with the fact that it may take some time and know that it will be worth it. Be consistent and have a reasonable plan. Know your limits, build the habit, track the progress for yourself to reflect on, and adjust your plan / skill building along the way, as needed. Youtube is helpful most of the time in learning pretty much anything. My favorite resource for learning a language is an app called HelloTalk.

For your second question I highly suggest shadowing. I don't know what can better replace shadowing someone who is "on the job." You have the opportunity to build a connection with that person and they can help you step through that door. Also, in shadowing, you are examining intentionally, what it is you want to do and why.

Best of luck to you!

You can Clep like a 1/2 of those prereqs, I'd get those out of the way so it feels less overwhelming

25 minutes ago, DMQ48 said:

You can Clep like a 1/2 of those prereqs, I'd get those out of the way so it feels less overwhelming

Bah, I hate CLEP. I clep’d Biology. I used straighterline for the prerequisites and am working toward doing the lab portions now. Straighterline breaks the material up a bit before your comprehensive proctored final. A shame not everyone takes them.

At this point it’s not the prerequisites I worry about, I finished those, it is learning a bulk of the pathophysiology and pharmacology info before I’m slammed with lectures and clinicals in an 18 month program.

Oh, you may want to check out some community college offering those and see if your nursing program will taken them. Nursing credits I heard are hard to transfer, but knocking off 9 credit hours of science would be nice.

I did an online/hybrid pathophysiology course where you just showed up at the campuses' testing center 4 times in the semester. This was like 6 years ago, before classes went so digital, so I'd be willing to bet there is a community college there doing it 100% online, especially with all this covid stuff. In NM, all of their nursing programs allow you to take it before getting accepted to the nursing program, pathophysiology 2 too.

Same thing goes for Pharm. There is a state community college in houston called Lee College that offers pharmacology online that they apply to their nursing program as well that you don't have to be accpeted into their nursing program to take.