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"I do everything an LPN can do" Oh,my gosh !

so, my friend finally got hired in our er, this, after much talk to my managers about how good an employee she would be etc.. etc... so that she could get in the er, go to nursing school. she is an ma, she was hired as a pct. she said the "er, soured " her on nursing". i'm sooo glad she's leaving. (after only 90 days) most people there are sick of her thinking she's "above" the job she was hired for. she has told people,"i'm the next thing to a nurse", " the er is boring", (ha !), " i do the same thing as a nurse", " i don't get paid enough for what i do here" . let me tell you some of the other halarious things she has said. she handed an attending a 12 lead, said to him , "it rsr". he said you can read these , she said "yes i can". we had trouble intubating a pt, got lots of air in the belly, called anesthesia, finally was intubated but just so happened when they got the tube in the pt let a big fart loose, she said, while pointing her finger at the dr, "your in ". we took a pt up to icu, she said " this is where people are really sick " oh my gosh, the other nurses are sick of it and want to offer some good old humility on a plate to her. all i can say is, i hope i'm there that night to help. the way i look at it, if she thinks she's anything like a nurse than time to step up and prove it. the ed is boring............ha,,,,,,ha,,,,,,,ha,,,,,,,, can you imagine the documetation for the intubation, " no. 8 et inserted, 24 cm right lip, no breath sounds present but we're sure the dr's in beacuse the ma heard a fart", :yeah::rolleyes: what the heck are they teaching ma's !:madface:

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

This goes across the board...there are LPNs that also say that they do 'everything the RN does' and so on. Sometimes, we are better off keeping our thoughts to ourselves. I am sure everyone is glad that she left. What a hilarious note!

OK I have to admit my stupidity on this what is "RSR"?

As far as what they teach MA's they do not teach them about intubation they teach then to run 12 lead not to read them.

They teach them to room patients in a doctor's office take vital signs, give injections, do dip sick labs. Then when they go though their internship at a doctor's office they are taught ojt to assist with procedures and other things the doctor may want assistance with. I was also taught clerical work in my program.

She is less qualified than a CNA to work in a hospital let alone an ER. (this is not a slam against CNAs on the contrary)

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

RSR is a wave on the EKG where there is a notch or dent on the QRS wave. If I am not mistaken, if it is wide enough, it can be considered a bundle branch block.

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

this is a dangerous person - no matter what her education or job title. Someone who knows it all is trying to prove it - with real patients are guinea pigs.

This goes across the board...there are LPNs that also say that they do 'everything the RN does' and so on. Sometimes, we are better off keeping our thoughts to ourselves. I am sure everyone is glad that she left. What a hilarious note!

Thank you for that. I used to work in the hospital but switched to LTC for schedule reasons and I've heard that sooo many times that #1 I'm starting to feel useless, and #2 I want to scream "Then why aren't there more LPNs in the hospitals!!!!"

Please don't flame me for that but when you are told over and over that your RN schooling was a waste of time because LPNs can do all the same things, you start to get a little bitter.

Also RSR is regular sinus rhythm. At least that's what I was taught (tele certified a year ago, BUT no longer reading tele) I've never heard of it describing a notch in QRS...

pagandeva2000, LPN

Specializes in Community Health, Med-Surg, Home Health.

Thank you for that. I used to work in the hospital but switched to LTC for schedule reasons and I've heard that sooo many times that #1 I'm starting to feel useless, and #2 I want to scream "Then why aren't there more LPNs in the hospitals!!!!"

Please don't flame me for that but when you are told over and over that your RN schooling was a waste of time because LPNs can do all the same things, you start to get a little bitter.

Also RSR is regular sinus rhythm. At least that's what I was taught (tele certified a year ago, BUT no longer reading tele) I've never heard of it describing a notch in QRS...

The way that my textbook displayed it, and my class, RSR was not described that way (as regular sinus rhythm), in fact, depending on which side is affected, it was worded as rSR or RSr. It may be the wording, because I am seeing now that different schools, books and such say slightly different things. I would like to hear how others have heard it being described.

Dixielee, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

Generally RSR or NSR, means regular or normal sinus rhythm and the terms are used to report a benign or normal rhythm or rate.

As far as MA's, CNA's feeling they can do as much as the nurse, I have seen a good bit of it over the years. We have a RN who was a tech in the department for many years and now is in the internship program. I always thought he was a fantastic tech, but he is really struggling as an RN. He is the first to admit that it is very different when you have the RN behind your name and the responsibility.

It takes someone who does take the responsibility seriously to realize that, and he will be a great RN once he gets a bit of time and confidence under his belt, because he DOES now feel the responsibility and is overwhelmed by it.

The ones I really worry about are the kind like the OP wrote about who are likely to never really understand what the pressure is like when you have your license at risk every day you go out there.

ann945n, RN

Specializes in Nursing Ed, Ob/GYN, AD, LTC, Rehab.

I recently ran into a student from my school who was just starting the RN program. She used to be a MA and admited she thought she could do everything an RN could do while she was an MA, a bit of a chip on her shoulder you could say. After starting the program though she told me she realized how little she really knew and the things she used to do as an MA now frighten her that she did them before.

As the saying goes, you dont know what you dont know.

"A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing" or "knows enough to be dangerous" are two old quotes that come to mind.

SillyStudent, ASN, RN

Specializes in ER/ICU, CCL, EP.

I remember being a tech and thinking that the nurses I worked with were unbelievably lazy. Now I am eating my words, without salt.

The reason my coworkers were too 'lazy' to go get a pillowcase, was because they were hovering over a monitor and trying to keep their critically ill patients alive. All the 'standing around' they did was titrating drips for blood pressure. I just had no way to understand exactly how much those nurses were responsible for.

Now that I have a license, I cringe when I think of how I perceived their actions. Thank God I was never outwardly rude with those nurses. I would have to write letters of apology ;)

:bowingpur

Dixielee, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER.

The reason my coworkers were too 'lazy' to go get a pillowcase, was because they were hovering over a monitor and trying to keep their critically ill patients alive. All the 'standing around' they did was titrating drips for blood pressure. I just had no way to understand exactly how much those nurses were responsible for.

:bowingpur

We have gone to all computer charting (don't get me started on that!), and one of the nurses was using the monitor directly across from a patient room because the one in the room was not working (grumble, grumble). He would do something with or for the patient then walk to the desk to a monitor that is to be used while standing, not behind the desk. The elderly patient had observed this for several hours and finally asked him what was so darned interesting on that TV that he kept watching! We all had a good laugh, but it drove home the point that we should never assume what is going on with someone else.

BlueRidgeHomeRN

Specializes in Home Care, Hospice, OB.

can you imagine the documetation for the intubation, " no. 8 et inserted, 24 cm right lip, no breath sounds present but we're sure the dr's in beacuse the ma heard a fart", :yeah::rolleyes:

:w00t::roll:roll:w00t::roll:roll

:rcgtku:

thought i was going to need to be coded from laughing so hard!!

made my day!!

Virgo_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac Telemetry, ED.

RSR is a wave on the EKG where there is a notch or dent on the QRS wave. If I am not mistaken, if it is wide enough, it can be considered a bundle branch block.

I've heard those referred to "R-R" waves. The first one is R, the second is R1. This is because the two ventricles are depolarizing at different times, and the QRS complexes are superimposed on one another. The entire complex in this situation would be a "QRRS" complex. This along with a QRS greater than 0.12, indicates a bundle branch block.

I think the MA in the OP probably meant Regular Sinus Rhythm, but we refer to that as Normal Sinus Rhythm, or NSR.

We had trouble intubating a pt, got lots of air in the belly, called anesthesia, finally was intubated but just so happened when they got the tube in the pt let a big fart loose, she said, while pointing her finger at the Dr, "Your in ".

:rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:

oh.

my.

goodness.

leslie:yeah:

If she thinks the ED is boring, she hasn't had to do triage yet. I wonder how she'd like putting up with some of the demanding, annoying people who show up there.

NURSEOK5

Specializes in ER, Acute care.

All I can say is WOW..........I have encountered CNA's and AUA's who do have great skills but are no where close to being educated on an LPN level nor a RN level to say the least. Someone must have thought this gal was great or she thought it about herself. As for the recommedation for her hire into your ED? I hope your manager understands, sometimes we don't know people like we think we do. I had recommeded a nurse that I worked with at a previous hospital to join me at my current hospital. Well, after her interview, I was told that she said she taught me everything I know. I will never forget that, I am very careful now of who I attatch my name to.

I usually will not give a reference unless I have personally worked with someone more than a year. Sorry your dept. had that happen....:wink2:........

tk3100

Specializes in ICU, OR.

OK I have to admit my stupidity on this what is "RSR"?

As far as what they teach MA's they do not teach them about intubation they teach then to run 12 lead not to read them.

They teach them to room patients in a doctor's office take vital signs, give injections, do dip sick labs. Then when they go though their internship at a doctor's office they are taught ojt to assist with procedures and other things the doctor may want assistance with. I was also taught clerical work in my program.

She is less qualified than a CNA to work in a hospital let alone an ER. (this is not a slam against CNAs on the contrary)

RSR is regular sinus rhythm

New addition to ACLS, Ascultate for fart sounds to confirm ett placement.

st4wb3rr33sh0rtc4k3

Specializes in Tele/ICU/MedSurg/Peds/SubAcute/LTC/Alz.

LOL, I had a patient one time, that was med seeker and thought because she was a CNA that she was a RN. Told me she took her boards... oooooo

She refused my LPN colleague, in the beginning of our shift, who mind you is an excellent nurse, because she had to wait for me the RN to push IV Dilaudid. She really got on my nerves sometimes, telling me how to do procedures, that she had no rationale for. She spent her whole night basically getting high and complained that her IV site burned. Duh, you keep complaining of a pain of 10, every two hours, and giving you Dilaudid every time it is due, it is going to be sore. She also kept removing her dressings that the doctor her scopy procedure, which a RN can't even do.

She didn't want me to do any teaching, because she knew it all.

I feel bad if she works anywhere, she must drive the nurses insane. :rolling:

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