Jump to content
Cynnie24

Cynnie24

Member Member
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 39

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 2,478

    Visitors

  • 0

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

Cynnie24's Latest Activity

  1. Hi all! I am a new-ish nurse, have been an RN for almost a year now. I have been working in a doctor's office since I graduated. It is a pediatric office. There are a couple MA's but the RNs do phone triage, catheters, handle all of the labs, give injections/medications, treatments, assist with casts/circumcisions/stitches, not to mention we deal with sometimes very anxious parents/children. I am not particularly sure I ever want to work acute care, I think my heart is more community/public health nursing. My question is, is this good experience, or am I "losing my skills"? Is there a bright future for community/public health/outpatient settings for nurses? If I ever wanted to work in a hospital prn, would that be a possibility? Thanks!
  2. All of the responses have been so wonderful. Thank you all so much for clearing this up for me!
  3. Hi guys, I got hired part time at a large family practice office and I am an RN that does everything that our MA's do at this clinic but I also answer phones and have lab duties. I previously worked at a SNF for 6 months before getting hired here. have been interested in working in a family practice clinic for quite some time, always have enjoyed the clinic atmosphere. I am part time and have had 3 days of orientation so far. I have not made any big mistakes but I keep making small dumb mistakes. My preceptor sits back and lets me do everything starting my third day all on my own and she is there to sometimes direct me/answer my questions. The other nurses there were impressed by the fact that I was already doing everything "on my own" (even though I am still on orientation) as a new grad on day 3, I guess usually they wait a little longer to throw the new grads to the wolves like that, but I make mistakes such as forgetting to ask more details about certain issues when I am asking patients questions from the computer in the exam room, I didnt know how to use their scale correctly (yikes), had to look up the age recommendations for certain vaccinations because its been a long time since I learned those, and other minor, dumb errors that make me look incompetent.I think it may be nerves from being new... I also ask a million questions throughout the day... Is this normal to make lots of little mistakes when you are new? When will I get comfortable and more competent? I really like this new job and want to keep it! Any tips?
  4. Hi everybody, I was just wondering if something that seems to happen a lot constitutes a hipaa violation. For example, in my clinical rotations as a student, I would see floor nurses in the hospital who were occupied in emergency situations having to have fellow floor nurses who were NOT assigned to the patient's care team (and not the charge nurse) pass some meds to other patients for them. For example, another floor nurse would pass a prn pain medication or a breathing treatment for that nurse's other patients. Now as a prudent nurse we need to follow the rights of medication and know WHY we are giving a medication, so that means knowing a bit of the patient's history right? We cannot blindly give medications. So, is safely administering medications for coworkers violating hipaa in some way if we are not assigned to their care? Another example, how about when fellow floor nurses ask other floor nurses to insert a foley in their patient, or to help start an IV on a patient after failed attempts? Or if there is no charge nurse on duty and there is a possible emergency situation, is it a hipaa violation if I pull an experienced RN in the room with me to validate my assessment if I wasnt sure of something/help assist with an emergency situation? Ok and I know we would always ask the patient before if another person can come assess but what if the patient is not able to communicate. I know obviously the number one priority is to keep the patient safe but are we technically violating hipaa in the process? Sorry if this is a silly question, Im still a very new nurse and am just curious of the technicalities of this. Thank you in advance!
  5. Hi everyone, I have written a resignation letter and will be resigning in 3.5 weeks from my current job for a new job. I work nights so management doesnt even come until 0900, I am off at 0630. However, the RCM is there around 0730 (my direct supervisor). I know I should be giving the resignation to my DON in person, but my commute is about an hour away and I am thinking I should just give it to my direct supervisor and to HR at the end of my work day? Is this unprofessional? Or should I drive into work during the day to meet with the DON in person? I know these questions seem silly, I have never done this before and I do not want to burn any bridges. Thank you all in advance.
  6. I work at a rehab/snf. I have been there for 7 months right out of school. I have found it is not for me, I work nights and cannot get a day/eve shift position and I am not adjusting to nights at all. My whole life is affected by my inability to sleep properly and I can feel it affect my overall health. Not to mention, I have been offered my dream job as a pediatric RN and I am just thrilled. I will be handing in my letter of resignation in the next day or two, and I feel really guilty because it is holiday season (though I ended up not having to work any holiday this holiday season). I am giving them 3.5 weeks until my last day. Nobody ever wants to cover night shifts and I really just hope this is enough time to find someone. Any advice on how to make this go over as well as possible when I hand in my letter to the DON? I have considered offering being on call until they find someone since I am full time but deep down I just want to focus on my new, full time job...Thank you
  7. I know this is a silly question but I have never had to resign before from a job. I feel guilty about leaving my job at a rehab/snf but it is not for me, and I have been offered my dream job as a pediatric RN. I have only been at this facility for 7 months right out of school. Also, I am required to give two weeks but I will be giving 3.5 weeks, I feel bad because we never have anyone to cover us on night shift because nobody wants to work the night shift. I just hope I am giving them enough time, I am full time. 😕 Any advice? Thank you.
  8. Hi everyone, The snf that Ive worked at since I graduated has low ratings... I respect a lot of the nurses there and believe they give great care including myself but apparently we had a survey not too long ago and we got tagged with deficiencies like F tags and G tags, I believe there were 3-5 tags total. We still have a pretty low rating. I am plugging away at applying for other jobs. I read somewhere that if a facility has f or g tags that everyone's license is in jeopardy that work there. Is this true? Any advice? I am so new that I dont know what red flags to look out for. I know I give the very best care I possibly can every day that I work and from what I see, our residents are treated and cared for very well by the other staff too, but then again I am not full time so I can only see so much. Any advice? I have a gut feeling that I should just put in my two weeks for the sake of my license because of the survey and the low ratings, and that it might ruin any chance of getting a job elsewhere since this place has low ratings, but on the other hand I feel that I could keep working to build experience until something better comes along. Thank you.
  9. I have been working in a SNF/Rehab facility for 5 months now (ever since I graduated, first job as a RN), and I am now plugging away at applying to hospitals and clinics. I do not see this environment as one that I want to spend my nursing career in. Am I stuck or is there a chance that I can market my skills and move on? At this job I have gained experience with vents, trachs, blood draws, peg tubes, central lines, IV abx, plenty of medication administration, performing assessments, wound care, wound vacs, foleys, inputting orders, supervising cnas, team collaboration, hospice patients, dementia patients, patient deaths, hospital transfers, lots of patient/family education etc. I will be applying for an RN-BSN program for the upcoming year as well. Any advice? Thank you!
  10. Cynnie24

    New grad RN in LTC/rehab, feeling conflicted

    I wanted to thank everyone for your replies. So far it is going alright though I have my bad days that I go home and can't stop thinking about work, even on my days off. I have faith that it will get better with time. Thanks again to all of you.
  11. Hello everybody, I am a new grad RN in a sub-acute rehab/LTC facility. I have been here for a month and am on my own, off orientation. When it comes to being cautious and sending patients to the ER r/t a patient condition change, I live by the saying "when in doubt, send them out". As much as I am on my toes and always on the lookout for anything that could go wrong so I could prevent it, I am worried that something wont be so obvious to me (especially because I am brand new and my assessment skills are not great and I have 20 patients). I am constantly running around throughout my shift. I am worried that a patient will end up being sent to the ER by the next nurse because I missed something and that I will be to blame because I delayed treatment. It would be very hard to live with myself if I thought I could have caused a patient to decline due to being swamped or just too new to identify an abnormal finding. How often does this happen, and how do I prevent this? This is a huge source of anxiety to me about my new job. I have seen this happen once to a nurse at my facility where the patient was hypotensive and the nurse did not send the patient out because the patient was stable other than the blood pressure, only to discover that the next shift nurse sent the patient out only one hour later r/t even worsening hypotension and the patient became symptomatic whereas he was asymptomatic before. I really appreciate all of the advice and wisdom on this forum. Thank you in advance.
  12. Hello everybody, I am a new grad RN in a sub-acute rehab/LTC facility. I have been here for a month and am on my own, off orientation. When it comes to being cautious and sending patients to the ER r/t a patient condition change, I live by the saying "when in doubt, send them out". As much as I am on my toes and always on the lookout for anything that could go wrong so I could prevent it, I am worried that something wont be so obvious to me (especially because I am brand new and my assessment skills are not great and I have 20 patients). I am constantly running around throughout my shift. I am worried that a patient will end up being sent to the ER by the next nurse because I missed something and that I will be to blame because I delayed treatment. It would be very hard to live with myself if I thought I could have caused a patient to decline due to being swamped or just too new to identify an abnormal finding. How often does this happen, and how do I prevent this? This is a huge source of anxiety to me about my new job. I have seen this happen once to a nurse at my facility where the patient was hypotensive and the nurse did not send the patient out because the patient was stable other than the blood pressure, only to discover that the next shift nurse sent the patient out only one hour later r/t even worsening hypotension and the patient became symptomatic whereas he was asymptomatic before. I really appreciate all of the advice and wisdom on this forum. Thank you in advance.
  13. Hello all. I graduated in December of last year and have been job hunting ever since. I finally got a job offer 3 weeks ago as an RN part-time in a LTC/rehab facility. I started training on nights and have had two weeks of orientation, I start on my own tomorrow. I will have 30 patients and on some nights I will be the only RN on the floor, but there will also be 2 lpns. I feel that being so inexperienced can be a dangerous position to be in and that I could lose my license if I miss something. The lpns are very proficient and know the ropes but I know that if a crisis happens, I ultimately have to do the assessments and take charge. I am nervous that I might miss something important due to inexperience, or make the wrong decision about something if an emergency happens. I am very conflicted because it seems like a pretty supportive environment but I do not want to risk my license by being put in a position of such responsibility being the only RN on some nights. Is this doable for a new grad? We also have some vent patients with respiratory therapists in the facility 24/7. It seems that many of the nurses have been there for years and that the turn-over is not high. Thanks in advance.
  14. Do you need a doctors order to change a foley catheter? This is a LTC facility. Lets say the foley is clogged after irrigating it per physician's orders. Ive heard yes and no. Thank you
  15. Hi Don1984, thanks for your reply and for the link. Around here it seems pretty rough for new grads to get a job in nursing homes, as most of them require at least 1 year of nursing experience. I'm also wondering if I should apply as a new grad anyways even though it says 1 year experience minimum.
  16. Hi all, I have passed my boards and am now looking for my first RN job. I see that lately there a quite a few LTC/SNFs that require one year of experience! Very rarely do I see a LTC facility not specify experience requirements. That worries me because I want to work in geriatrics but now I feel that it is going to be just as hard as getting acute care experience. Does anyone have any suggestions on getting hired in a facility such as LTC/SNF? I really appreciate it. Thanks in advance.