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Precaution Carts

Specializes in Big Variety.

If we are putting them outside the MRSA rooms, why aren't we putting them outside AIDS rooms???? I know about the stigma of AIDS. Confidentiality is important to both! We do not put diagnosis on the signs!

If we can put them out for one I think it should definitely be there for the AIDs too!!! What's the difference? I just don't get it!

Universal/Standard precautions we use BUT that little extra that comes with the carts outside the room is helpful!

If we are putting them outside the MRSA rooms, why aren't we putting them outside AIDS rooms???? I know about the stigma of AIDS. Confidentiality is important to both! We do not put diagnosis on the signs!

If we can put them out for one I think it should definitely be there for the AIDs too!!! What's the difference? I just don't get it!

Universal/Standard precautions we use BUT that little extra that comes with the carts outside the room is helpful!

We don't put it outside of their rooms because HIV patients are not put into isolation.

I mean seriously?

Virgo_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac Telemetry, ED.

People who are HIV positive are not placed in contact/droplet/airborne isolation, since HIV is not transmitted via any of those routes. Therefore, an isolation cart is unnecessary. If you are anticipating coming into contact with the blood of an HIV positive person, such as starting an IV or changing a dressing, then standard precautions are adequate. The HIV virus does not survive well outside the body, and transmission via fomites is not a risk, unlike MRSA, which is transmitted via direct and indirect contact, since it can remain viable on fomites for weeks.

mama_d, BSN, RN

Specializes in tele, oncology. Has 10 years experience.

:yeahthat:

Universal precautions should cover you with HIV or hep C patients, but will not cover you in the case of c-diff, VRE, MRSA, influenza, TB, etc.

heron, ASN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 40 years experience.

It's the cases you don't know about that'll get ya.

The best advice is to be absolutely obsessive about universal precautions, especially with those patients you would never suspect as having one of these viruses.

This is one of the situations where buying into stereotypes will turn around and bite you.

As for what's the difference, see the posts above or surf the CDC's website.

APBT mom, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Tele, IM, OB/GYN, neuro, GI.

What extra is in an isolation cart that you would need constantly for the care of a patient with HIV?

If I'm taking care of any patient and I need a gown I grab one same with masks. If I'm going into do an assessment I wear gloves for everyone. Doesn't matter what they have or what they're in for because you never know what you might have to do or stick your hand in.

I agree with the pp look at the CDC website for HIV and see what precautions you should use.

mcknis

Specializes in Med Surg, ER, OR.

We don't do isolation for HIV/AIDS pts, but depending on the T-cell CD4 count, reverse precautions may be initiated.

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