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Please help me understand. Can iv fluid affect...

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Can getting a high rate of iv fluids affect a persons thirst mechanism or cause a patient to not want to drink? For example, if a patients dehydration has been treated with a fluid bolts and now that patient is on iv fluids at a high rate (maintenance rate would be 48 but this patients rate is 75ml/hr) and he is not wanting to drink anything.

I have spent just about an entire hour looking for something on the internet to see if this is true or not but nothing is pulling up.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

You tried positing about this same topic a couple days ago. Several questions were raised by respondents.

There's prob more to this scenario.

Actually this is a totally different question. What I'm trying to understand now is IF IV FLUIDS CAN AFFECT THE THIRST MECHANISM. Which I wouldn't assume there would be more to include in that question. I never asked this in the previous post. In the previous post I asked about signs of fluid volume over load. Thanks for reading my previous post although they were never acknowledged by you. like most people in here, I am simply trying to learn and find resources.

Look up Thirst mechanism and you will see many diagrams that show what leads to "Thirst". One of the triggers is plasma osmolarity-as the osmolarity increases the body response leads to drinking fluids. IV fluids decrease osmolarity which does not lead to triggering "Thirst".

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 40 years experience.

Duplicate threads merged as per TOS

Esme12, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma. Has 40 years experience.

Can getting a high rate of iv fluids affect a persons thirst mechanism or cause a patient to not want to drink? For example, if a patients dehydration has been treated with a fluid bolts and now that patient is on iv fluids at a high rate (maintenance rate would be 48 but this patients rate is 75ml/hr) and he is not wanting to drink anything.

I have spent just about an entire hour looking for something on the internet to see if this is true or not but nothing is pulling up.

I have done and internet search and received many hits. What semester are you?

Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid-Base Balance

fluids

Water, Hydration and Health

Zyprexa

Has 2 years experience.

Could it be that the patient was refusing to drink prior to this, became dehydrated, and was brought to the hospital for IV fluids? The patient might be refusing to drink for whatever reason they were initially refusing to drink.

Also 75 ml/hr is not a "high" rate. I'm guessing you've never given a 1L bolus of NS over 1 hour (999 ml/hr rate).

Actually this is a totally different question. What I'm trying to understand now is IF IV FLUIDS CAN AFFECT THE THIRST MECHANISM. Which I wouldn't assume there would be more to include in that question. I never asked this in the previous post. In the previous post I asked about signs of fluid volume over load. Thanks for reading my previous post although they were never acknowledged by you. like most people in here, I am simply trying to learn and find resources.

Do you understand the thirst mechanism?

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

Could it be that the patient was refusing to drink prior to this, became dehydrated, and was brought to the hospital for IV fluids? The patient might be refusing to drink for whatever reason they were initially refusing to drink.

Also 75 ml/hr is not a "high" rate. I'm guessing you've never given a 1L bolus of NS over 1 hour (999 ml/hr rate).

In all fairness the student is talking about a pediatric patient. For whatever reason it didn't show here but did in their other identical post. But that is why they posted the pt had already received the bolus and the maintenance rate based off weight should have been the 48mL/hr but was set at 75, which would have been a high rate in a child if the calculations are correct.

That said a liter of fluid over an hr isn't that fast either. When we are giving an actual bolus we are going as fast as it will go on with the norm being around 20 mins.

Zyprexa

Has 2 years experience.

In all fairness the student is talking about a pediatric patient. For whatever reason it didn't show here but did in their other identical post. But that is why they posted the pt had already received the bolus and the maintenance rate based off weight should have been the 48mL/hr but was set at 75, which would have been a high rate in a child if the calculations are correct.

That said a liter of fluid over an hr isn't that fast either. When we are giving an actual bolus we are going as fast as it will go on with the norm being around 20 mins.

Oh I'm sorry, I didn't realize the patient was pediatric. That explains a bit more, I thought the student was talking about an adult patient. I know fluid can be given faster than 1L/hr, I was trying to give the student an example of how fast we typically gave a bolus on the medical/tele floor. I've never worked ICU or ED, where the patients are typically more unstable and need fluid at a faster rate. I work psych now, so haven't had to deal with IV pumps in awhile, but if I remember correctly the max rate for our pumps was 999mL/hr. Anything faster than that had to go by gravity and/or with a pressure bag.

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

Oh I'm sorry, I didn't realize the patient was pediatric. That explains a bit more, I thought the student was talking about an adult patient. I know fluid can be given faster than 1L/hr, I was trying to give the student an example of how fast we typically gave a bolus on the medical/tele floor. I've never worked ICU or ED, where the patients are typically more unstable and need fluid at a faster rate. I work psych now, so haven't had to deal with IV pumps in awhile, but if I remember correctly the max rate for our pumps was 999mL/hr. Anything faster than that had to go by gravity and/or with a pressure bag.

Yea I am not sure why it didn't show up in this post that it was a peds patient because the posts were identical before the threads were merged, I am guessing the other thread is here somewhere because it's the one I responded too a few times as well, but I posted in the original post so that's the only reason I knew. She just seemed confused enough so I wanted to clarify in case she came back and read thinking that she got her maintenance rate off.

guest042302019, BSN, RN

Specializes in Progressive, Intermediate Care, and Stepdown.

Yes, it can affect the thirst mechanism. But, why? That's the question. Consider where the thirst response and mechanism comes from. It's not fluid bolts. It's bolus. :)