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Please advice me

I have BSN from outside usa country . I finished my evaluation and my BSN is equivalent to BSN from US approved college . Plus I am an RN also in my original country and this was verified as well  but I have an issue that I have not practiced as nurse for last 4 years so most of states are requiring this . I am applying at non clinical jobs using my BSN and hopfully I can get something . I am considering to switch to RT school so do you think having BSN will help me meet some credits and cut the years of study? what is my bets option to switch to something else using my BSN? Thank you .

4 hours ago, Sam84 said:

I have BSN from outside usa country . I finished my evaluation and my BSN is equivalent to BSN from US approved college . Plus I am an RN also in my original country and this was verified as well  but I have an issue that I have not practiced as nurse for last 4 years so most of states are requiring this . I am applying at non clinical jobs using my BSN and hopfully I can get something . I am considering to switch to RT school so do you think having BSN will help me meet some credits and cut the years of study? what is my bets option to switch to something else using my BSN? Thank you .

Your circumstances are very unique, and you're probably going to have to look at specific programs to see what they require and are willing to accept. In some cases, qualified nurses without recent experience may be able to take a refresher course, too ...but there are many variables. Redoing an entire nursing program might also be an option, especially if you can find one reasonably priced and you're a competitive candidate.

If you can’t determine where you stand for various programs by reading their requirements on their websites, then an appointment with, or call to, an advisor would be in order. 

KatieMI specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

Been' (close to) there, know many people who are still in the same boat.

Absolutely for sure, no U.S. based RRT program will account for any nursing courses from overseas. Also, becoming an RRT will likely get you money to live on but won't help you to get back to nursing because these two types of degrees and experience are not deemed comparable. Same about everything else, including imaging techs, physical/occupational therapists, etc. 

If you want to return to nursing and cannot get licensed because of work stage requirement, your best and safest bet would be to find a state with no such requirement, get licensed,  get 6 to 12 months work experience there and then apply by reciprocity in the state you want to settle down. It can still be very difficult if your final destination is California but still many people successfully do that. Another way is to take a refresher course for BSN, but before investing your $$$ there make sure that it will obliterate work stage requirement. It is very state and even school-dependent, you might need to check both Board of Nursing in the state of your interest and the schools. 

If you think you'll ever want to continue your education in Master's of Nursing, it will be exceedingly difficult, if not impossible, to get an admission in any reputable U.S. program because your foreign degree and coursework won't be recognized, however many  expensive "evaluations" they request for your money. Most people I know with foreign nursing degrees have to go through ABSN programs if they want Master's degree in nursing. Interestingly, some Physician Assistant programs are way more friendly and easy to get into. 

I actually did work from 2013 to 2019 in infusion suite in USA doing same responsibility as an RN under the physician license but did not hold the  title as an RN .do you think if I provide proof of this will count ? 

24 minutes ago, Sam84 said:

I actually did work from 2013 to 2019 in infusion suite in USA doing same responsibility as an RN under the physician license but did not hold the  title as an RN .do you think if I provide proof of this will count ? 

How long have you had a BSN and if you worked in the US for 6 yrs why didn't you get one then?

I graduated in 2007 from my BSN overseas and worked as an RN is my forieg country until I moved here . I did not get one cause I tried one time NCLEX within a year of my moving here and did not pass it so I did not try it again . scared of failing again probably and just being irresponsible in life made bad choices and having job that time give me this secure feeling I am OK . I mean I still feel secure but I want to try to fix what I screwed . 

KatieMI specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

33 minutes ago, Sam84 said:

I actually did work from 2013 to 2019 in infusion suite in USA doing same responsibility as an RN under the physician license but did not hold the  title as an RN .do you think if I provide proof of this will count ? 

No. Unless you have U.S.  RN title and licensed to practice as such, you are not RN and cannot legally claim to be one.

KatieMI specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

42 minutes ago, Sam84 said:

Yea I never claimed to be an RN in US . 

Therefore, unfortunately, you cannot claim any part of your previoys experience as "nursing". 

 

KatieMI specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine.

2 hours ago, Sam84 said:

 

So, did you pass NCLEX already, or just got your education equivalence for BSN

2 hours ago, Sam84 said:

I graduated in 2007 from my BSN overseas and worked as an RN is my forieg country until I moved here . I did not get one cause I tried one time NCLEX within a year of my moving here and did not pass it so I did not try it again . scared of failing again probably and just being irresponsible in life made bad choices and having job that time give me this secure feeling I am OK . I mean I still feel secure but I want to try to fix what I screwed . 

So the BON told you to take the NCLEX for licensure in The States, is that right? If that's the case, you would have to take the NCLEX no matter which state you move to. If you're unable to pass the NCLEX based upon your education in your foreign country, you would most likely need to take an RN program from the beginning, especially since it's been quite a while since you've tried the NCLEX.

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