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Out Of BEDSIDE nursing

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webbiedebbie

Specializes in OB, Telephone Triage, Chart Review/Code. Has 22 years experience.

I don't see many (or any) positions like those offered. My problem is being able to make as much as I do at the hospital. Parish nursing around here is done on our own time. Churches can't afford to pay, and the hospital here in town just dropped the program in their hospital. I don't see many ads for drup reps. I would love to get into QA, but there have been no openings at all in the last three years at my hospital.

webbiedebbie

Specializes in OB, Telephone Triage, Chart Review/Code. Has 22 years experience.

I don't see many (or any) positions like those offered. My problem is being able to make as much as I do at the hospital. Parish nursing around here is done on our own time. Churches can't afford to pay, and the hospital here in town just dropped the program in their hospital. I don't see many ads for drup reps. I would love to get into QA, but there have been no openings at all in the last three years at my hospital.

I agree with the above post by Quickbeam, these jobs aren't easy to come by.

I agree with the above post by Quickbeam, these jobs aren't easy to come by.

Have you considered being an independent RN? There are many, many ways to achieve this. Most of what we dislike about bedside nursing is not actually the nursing care, but the politics, people, budget issues, schedulers, managers, etc etc.

I fought burn out for 30+ years by changing my specialty every few years. It's a little scary and some of it was forced upon me by changes in my husband's work, but mostly it worked out.

Education (I have been a qualified nurse educator since 1984) is not an easier option. The stresses and budget issues can be more overwhelming than bedside nursing, pay is not usually up to what one can earn in a high acuity clinical area, promotion structure has it's own problems (think drive to publish, get the Ph.D, tenure track etc) and taking ten raw students to an acute clinical site is a very specific sort of nightmare (and no educator of any caliber teaches what they do not practice!)

Currently I work as an Independent Nurse Provider (INP) for Medi-Cal. My motivation is the control over my own life. I work about 3/4 time, still do something considered valuable to society, maintain clinical skills and am thanked for my work every day. I spend about half a day per month on paperwork related to being an IC.

Check out independentrn.com although you cannot access the supportive, intelligent, practically useful forum without membership.

Have you considered being an independent RN? There are many, many ways to achieve this. Most of what we dislike about bedside nursing is not actually the nursing care, but the politics, people, budget issues, schedulers, managers, etc etc.

I fought burn out for 30+ years by changing my specialty every few years. It's a little scary and some of it was forced upon me by changes in my husband's work, but mostly it worked out.

Education (I have been a qualified nurse educator since 1984) is not an easier option. The stresses and budget issues can be more overwhelming than bedside nursing, pay is not usually up to what one can earn in a high acuity clinical area, promotion structure has it's own problems (think drive to publish, get the Ph.D, tenure track etc) and taking ten raw students to an acute clinical site is a very specific sort of nightmare (and no educator of any caliber teaches what they do not practice!)

Currently I work as an Independent Nurse Provider (INP) for Medi-Cal. My motivation is the control over my own life. I work about 3/4 time, still do something considered valuable to society, maintain clinical skills and am thanked for my work every day. I spend about half a day per month on paperwork related to being an IC.

Check out independentrn.com although you cannot access the supportive, intelligent, practically useful forum without membership.

eltrip

Specializes in Clinical Risk Management.

Telephone triage &/or nurse advice lines. Check with health insurance companies. There might be one near you. We have 3 health insurance companies in my city (I don't work for any of the 3) & they are constantly hiring nurses for their purposes.

Have you considered occupational health? That can also be an interesting field.

Opportunities abound. Good luck as you search!

eltrip

Specializes in Clinical Risk Management.

Telephone triage &/or nurse advice lines. Check with health insurance companies. There might be one near you. We have 3 health insurance companies in my city (I don't work for any of the 3) & they are constantly hiring nurses for their purposes.

Have you considered occupational health? That can also be an interesting field.

Opportunities abound. Good luck as you search!

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 43 years experience.

I think the replies in this thread have offered some very good advice. While there are a few lucky people who just seem to fall easily into jobs they love ... most people who have those highly desired jobs in nursing have them because they worked hard to get them and beat out a lot of competition.

Sometimes it takes additional education. Other times it takes switching specialties, or hospitals, or geographic location. Sometimes, opportunities open up because administrators know you personally from having worked with you on committees or special projects.

Someone interested in exploring local opportunities in your hospital and/or home town might begin by interviewing local nursing leaders. Ask them to assess your particular situation and the status of the job market in your area. What will you need to do to get the types of attractive opportunities available?

Just a thought,

llg

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 43 years experience.

I think the replies in this thread have offered some very good advice. While there are a few lucky people who just seem to fall easily into jobs they love ... most people who have those highly desired jobs in nursing have them because they worked hard to get them and beat out a lot of competition.

Sometimes it takes additional education. Other times it takes switching specialties, or hospitals, or geographic location. Sometimes, opportunities open up because administrators know you personally from having worked with you on committees or special projects.

Someone interested in exploring local opportunities in your hospital and/or home town might begin by interviewing local nursing leaders. Ask them to assess your particular situation and the status of the job market in your area. What will you need to do to get the types of attractive opportunities available?

Just a thought,

llg

ceecel.dee, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, ER, L&D, ICU, OR, Educator.

Have a good idea for a program that is needed at your current hospital?

The more graduate classes I took, the more programs I identified as our hospital being in need of.

Spoke frequently to my DON about ideas, and soon she was asking for the input... then, if I would be willing to implement them (well, some of them anyway :)).

Now, the new program, policy ideas come to me (from Dr.'s and nurses) faster than I can implement them (I have maintained a strict part-time status), and if we had any nurses to spare, could use the help of another doer.

Is there a position you can create for yourself (if you like your hospital enough to want to stay there)?

Good Luck!

ceecel.dee, MSN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, ER, L&D, ICU, OR, Educator.

Have a good idea for a program that is needed at your current hospital?

The more graduate classes I took, the more programs I identified as our hospital being in need of.

Spoke frequently to my DON about ideas, and soon she was asking for the input... then, if I would be willing to implement them (well, some of them anyway :)).

Now, the new program, policy ideas come to me (from Dr.'s and nurses) faster than I can implement them (I have maintained a strict part-time status), and if we had any nurses to spare, could use the help of another doer.

Is there a position you can create for yourself (if you like your hospital enough to want to stay there)?

Good Luck!

I work for a managed care company and I review car accidents and recommend (or not) treatment. I have only been here about three months but I really like it. I am a full time BSN student and it was too much on my plate to have the stress of agency nursing and school..kids..so on and so on. I do not make the $ that the agency paid me, but its worth the trade off right now. I also have great benefits. I put my resume on monster.com and I was bombarded with calls. My current employer interviewed me and I started the next week.

Good luck! I am going to look for a unique position when I graduate. I have been in too many situations that I felt unsafe and overworked (16 hours shifts) along with never getting to even have some lunch or run to the bathroom. You will find something you like, just put your name out and they will come.

jen

I work for a managed care company and I review car accidents and recommend (or not) treatment. I have only been here about three months but I really like it. I am a full time BSN student and it was too much on my plate to have the stress of agency nursing and school..kids..so on and so on. I do not make the $ that the agency paid me, but its worth the trade off right now. I also have great benefits. I put my resume on monster.com and I was bombarded with calls. My current employer interviewed me and I started the next week.

Good luck! I am going to look for a unique position when I graduate. I have been in too many situations that I felt unsafe and overworked (16 hours shifts) along with never getting to even have some lunch or run to the bathroom. You will find something you like, just put your name out and they will come.

jen

Originally posted by llg

most people who have those highly desired jobs in nursing have them because they worked hard to get them and beat out a lot of competition.

I completely agree with llg. Life is choices and chances, Luvlife put your best effort into to finding a different job, the worst that can happen is you will gain a new experience.

Originally posted by llg

most people who have those highly desired jobs in nursing have them because they worked hard to get them and beat out a lot of competition.

I completely agree with llg. Life is choices and chances, Luvlife put your best effort into to finding a different job, the worst that can happen is you will gain a new experience.

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