What ages need sequential stockings?

  1. Do you put sequentials on all patients or just older patients?
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    About linda2097

    Joined: Feb '08; Posts: 445; Likes: 240

    9 Comments

  3. by   TakeTwoAspirin
    If they are getting general anesthesia, they get sequentials. Simple as that.
  4. by   smithd5
    We don't use sequential compression stockings on our pedi patients; in our OR patient's age 15 or 16 and older will get them, or younger patients that are the size of a 15 or 16 year old, unless specifically requested by the surgeon.
  5. by   Rose_Queen
    Typically we put SCDs on any patients who have general anesthesia for more than 45min, unless we're doing leg surgery. Our old machines used to not work only hooked up to one SCD, and most people aren't in the habit of putting only one on. We have a committee doing research to see if we can go to a standard order of "if under anesthesia for x min, they go on."
  6. by   Anisettes
    The policy at my facility is for EVERY patient 35 and over regardless of proc. length and anyone undergoing any type of laparascopic procedure that is not a pediatric patient. And of course, if surgeon requests them.
  7. by   cmonkey
    *bump* because I have a question about these things.

    Is there something about anesthesia that promotes DVT development vs just lying around for an extended period of time?
  8. by   TakeTwoAspirin
    When you are just lying around you are still using muscles in your legs, however subtle the movements are. When you are chemically paralysed (as is often the case during general anesthesia) the muscles are incapable of moving and therefore the blood in your legs is prone to pooling/clotting.
  9. by   cmonkey
    That's sort of what I figured, but I wanted to be sure. It begs the question, though: long flights. Is the DVT risk there due more to the pressurization of the cabin or sitting? Because even on a long flight, you can still move your legs around a fair amount, yet they still warn about DVT concerns.
  10. by   cmonkey
    PS, my dad used to have TAK 2 ASA as his license plate. He'd love you!
  11. by   linda2097
    Quote from cmonkey
    That's sort of what I figured, but I wanted to be sure. It begs the question, though: long flights. Is the DVT risk there due more to the pressurization of the cabin or sitting? Because even on a long flight, you can still move your legs around a fair amount, yet they still warn about DVT concerns.
    Cabin pressure is supposed to be similar to ground level pressure, so it should not have an effect. Most people move their legs very little during flights because they are packed in like sardines.
    "Experts think that sitting for hours together in cramped spaces and dehydration triggers these blood clots"
    http://www.newslocale.org/health/hne...070710983.html
    Last edit by linda2097 on Dec 11, '09

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