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Online CPR Cert

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Has 2 years experience.

Has anyone used one of these before. Did your school/employer accept it?

I took my first CPR class from my college about 6yrs ago..it was a 2 day course. I'm thinking about working as a CNA again...hopefully applying for an OB tech position next spring and I know a lot of places require an active cpr cert.

I've been looking at this site BLS CPR Training and Classes for Infant, Child and Adult $14.99 | CPR AED Certification it seems legit...

APRN-CT, DNP, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner. Has 5 years experience.

I did the AHA online course through my employer and got thye same card as the regular class

MikeFromMT

Specializes in Med Surg, Ortho/Neuro, Hospice.. Has 5 years experience.

We had to take CPR for Healthcare Providers, on-line was not accepted.

I wouldn't feel comfortable taking it online....the first I took cpr I didn't pay attention and goofed off....I took it again for re-certification and was thankful....I had to use cpr on my daughter (age 3) and all of my kids choked at least once....ages (8 months to 3)....

PacoUSA, BSN, RN

Specializes in PCU / Telemetry. Has 9 years experience.

Most schools and employers specify that the CPR course must be taken through the American Heart Association, and your link does not look like its in any way affiliated with it. Don't do it. Save yourself the hassle and go the legitimate route. Actually, I just went back and looked at that page you linked, and they have copies of the wallet cards that they issue. ARE YOU KIDDING ME? What a scam! Their cards are in the same colors and graphically like the AHA cards!! Now I really can say, RUN from these people!

See links for BLS - Basic Life Support. I did this certification.

Most places/schools require BLS with AED through American Heart Association. There are some that you can do the read thourgh the material and written test online and then get your skills checked off in person to be certified....but none entirely online through AHA. Though unless you are still confident in your CPR and AED skills i would recomend taking the actual class. It is only 4 hours of your time.

APRN-CT, DNP, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner. Has 5 years experience.

I had to take this one...HeartCode™ BLS part 1, I did part 2 through my hospitals EMS training center. It's a nice option if you are comfortable with CPR/AED already.

CNM2B201?

Has 2 years experience.

jguy said:
Most places/schools require BLS with AED through American Heart Association. There are some that you can do the read through the material and written test online and then get your skills checked off in person to be certified....but none entirely online through AHA. Though unless you are still confident in your CPR and AED skills i would recommend taking the actual class. It is only 4 hours of your time.

My class was 2 full days, a Saturday and a Sunday.

CNM2B201? said:
My class was 2 full days, a Saturday and a Sunday.

Honestly that doesn't say much. That could mean you are completely confident in your CPR skills and the online test and then in person skills assesment to verify you know your stuff is all you need, more as a technecality. But it could be that enough time has passed that you havent even thought about it and so don't have any confidence in it. Could be you went through the motions of the course and the instructors allowed you to, and so you never really learned it quite right. All I was saying is only YOU know how confident you are in your knowledge and skills, and so you would need to judge if online or full class in person is what is best for you.

However without an in person skills verification as part of the certification, I would bet anything that it will be accepted nowhere as a required health care provider CPR. That site is extremely shady looking. As someone else stated, the cards look very similar to AHA certification cards. Any legit certification wouldnt try to make their card at a quick glance look like the main accepted certification. It also does not provide contact info. My AHA card has contact info for the testing site so if anyone would want to confirm the validity of my certification, the number is right on the card.

PacoUSA, BSN, RN

Specializes in PCU / Telemetry. Has 9 years experience.

Yes, they look very similar ... See below! Unless it says american red cross, it's not a valid certification.

I went to that scam website again and read their faq. They claim: after passing the online quiz, you will be able to immediately print your certification and wallet card right from you home or office printer. You could also request the certificates to be mailed for a low shipping cost.

Warning: while you can take part 1 of the bls training online through aha, you can't complete a valid bls certification completely online. You must have an in-person skills check with a certified aha skills instructor or evaluator. They have to physically see you performing cpr and breathing skills on a mannequin and rate your technique. Your card is issued after successful completion of the skills check!

I think it is a dangerous thing to have an operation such as american academy of cpr & first aid, inc. In existence. People are actually walking around with these cards purporting to be certified when they are not. Lord knows what they are learning in this free class.

2097332671_ValidvsFakeBLSCards.thumb.jpg.72ce9cbbd52aecc08de47d7dcfc6537f.jpg

CNM2B201?

Has 2 years experience.

jguy said:
Honestly that doesn't say much. That could mean you are completely confident in your CPR skills and the online test and then in person skills assesment to verify you know your stuff is all you need, more as a technecality. But it could be that enough time has passed that you havent even thought about it and so don't have any confidence in it. Could be you went through the motions of the course and the instructors allowed you to, and so you never really learned it quite right. All I was saying is only YOU know how confident you are in your knowledge and skills, and so you would need to judge if online or full class in person is what is best for you.

However without an in person skills verification as part of the certification, I would bet anything that it will be accepted nowhere as a required health care provider CPR. That site is extremely shady looking. As someone else stated, the cards look very similar to AHA certification cards. Any legit certification wouldnt try to make their card at a quick glance look like the main accepted certification. It also does not provide contact info. My AHA card has contact info for the testing site so if anyone would want to confirm the validity of my certification, the number is right on the card.

My comment was directed towards your comment of "its only 4 hours" the only classes I'm aware of around my area are 2 full days in length...

CNM2B201? said:
my comment was directed towards your comment of "its only 4 hours" the only classes im aware of around my area are 2 full days in length...

AHA BLS for healthcare providers is listed on the AHA site as estimated to be 4.5-5 hours......most testing sites I have seen list it as 4-4.5 hours. Mine actually took about 3 hours since only 2 people ended up registering so we didnt have to wait on other people practicing skills and then getting checked off for skills.

APRN-CT, DNP, APRN, NP

Specializes in Family Nurse Practitioner. Has 5 years experience.

Renewal classes are shorter

The following information was copied from previous posts I have made regarding basic life support (bls) training. I believe that all of the links are still active.

The subject of bls certification and what programs are acceptable seems to appear fairly regularly. The following is provided to hopefully clarify questions regarding which program and format to choose, as well as contact information for some of these programs. I am an american heart association (aha) bls instructor and am familiar with their programs. I am not affiliated with any of the other programs listed, therefore have no personal knowledge regarding any of them.

The international liaison committee on resuscitation (ilcor) is an international organization comprised of eight resuscitation agencies, of which the aha is a member. In 2000, ilcor published the first international resuscitation guidelines. The 2010 international consensus on cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care science with treatment recommendations are the most recent to be released.

Although the aha does not sanction bls courses in the usa, they did publish the 2005 american heart association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (cpr) and emergency cardiovascular care (ecc). From these guidelines, they subsequently developed their bls programs. This is probably why most of us think of the aha when we think of bls training. It is important to remember this as any class not in accordance with these guidelines is not likely to be accepted. The 2010 american heart association guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and emergency cardiovascular care science have recently been published as well, and the aha will be updating all of its programs over the next few months.

Other agencies were then free to develop their own courses based upon these guidelines, and several have. I am aware of the american red cross (arc), american safety and health institute (ashi):, procpr and american aed/cpr association, and there are probably others that I am not aware of. Some of these programs are offered in the traditional classroom setting while others are offered in a blended format.

There is no official or preferred bls program to satisfy the joint commission (jc) requirement. Joint commission standard pc.02.01.11 reads: resuscitation services are available throughout the hospital lists the following as one of the elements of performance: "An evidenced-based training program(s) is used to train staff to recognize the need for and use of resuscitation equipment and techniques."

Using this standard, each facility is free to determine which program or programs that they will use to satisfy this requirement. Some facilities are specific as to which program they will accept (I.E. Only aha or arc, etc.) while others will accept any program as long as it is compliant with the 2005 aha guidelines for cpr and ecc. If the posting does not specify that only a specific program is acceptable it might be prudent to contact someone to determine exactly which programs are accepted.

After determining which program that you are going to take, you then need to determine the program format to take. Basic life support training is currently offered in three formats: traditional, blended, and online.

Using the traditional format, you go to a training center and spend four to eight hours watching videos, doing skills review and evaluation, and complete the written test. At the end of the day you receive a course completion/certification card. This is probably what most people are familiar with.

The blended format is exactly that, it is a combination of both online and classroom training. In a blended program you will complete the cognitive/didactic portion on line, as well as completed the written test on line. Upon completion of the test you print out your course completion form to take to an instructor where you then complete the skills review and testing portion. Upon completion of the skills review/testing you are issued your course completion/certification card. There is generally no distinction between completion of either a traditional or blended course.

Online courses, as the name implies, are offered totally online. These programs consist only of the cognitive/didactic portion, without a skills review/testing. While I personally would not take an online course without skills review/testing it might be accepted by some schools/agencies.

The aha offers their bls for health care provider course in both the traditional and blended format. Aha elearning bls is offered in two formats: heartcode bls part 1 and bls for healthcare providers part 1. Successful completion of either course results in receipt of an aha bls for health care providers course, the difference is in how the online portion is presented. Upon completion of part 1, the participant must schedule with an approved aha instructor to complete parts 2 and 3, skills review and evaluation. You can then use the aha ecc course connector to locate an approved training center and schedule a skills review/evaluation. The aha ecc course connector can also be used to locate a traditional program as well, if that is preferred.

Although the arc previously offered their cpr professional rescuer & aed for healthcare providers in both the traditional and blended format, I am unsure whether the blended format is still an option. You can then use the arc online training skills map to locate an approved training center and schedule a class. The aha and arc recently renewed their statement of understanding. In this revised statement of understanding, the "Aha and arc agree to recognize the other's student level cpr, aed and first aid training programs as equivalent in content, as shown in the following table of courses" although it is unclear how the upcoming revisions will affect this agreement. The entire statement of understanding between the aha and the arc is available for download.

The ashi cpr for the professional rescuer is currently available as a traditional program. The cpr for the professional rescuer program standards states that this programs intended audience includes "Healthcare providers, first responders, and professional rescuers in and outside the hospital or for those needing professional-level basic life support training as a job requirement."

Procpr offers a blended online/hands-on cpr certification option ($29.95). I was unable to find any information regarding time limits. Upon completion of the online portion, you can then contact a procpr skills evaluator for your skills review/evaluation, and there may or may not be an additional fee for the skills evaluation. The following was taken from the procpr statement of accreditation and compliance "Procpr is an accredited program that satisfies the requirements for cpr training according to the latest ecc/ilcor and the american heart association guidelines."

The american aed/cpr association's onsite cpr/aed training classes site states they do have a blended course. Their website contains the following statement: "Our cards are widely accepted since the american aed/cpr association follows the same guidelines (ecc 2005) as mandated by most states for cpr and aed card requirements." although I was unable to find information regarding location of their training centers, the site states they will bring the class to your location.