ughhhhh...

  1. ok just when i am trying to get a little self confidence in my job and feeling a little bit more comfortable..in comes a 20 smthing weeker....breech, srom'd, take her back for a section but the baby is right there...the doc starts yelling for this and that...those stirrups which i totally did not know how to set up in the or..nitro..pit, pump,.forceps...which i could not find...and saying can we get someone in here that knows what they are doing...ughhhh....when the docs get all worked up and screaming and yelling i go into shutdown mode and i am like duhhhhh...how do i get over this???? or do you...
  2. Visit hoping to be an rn profile page

    About hoping to be an rn

    Joined: Nov '04; Posts: 66

    12 Comments

  3. by   leosrain
    I don't think I've been in an experience that intimidating (ugh...sounds VERY frustrating). But, I think the best way to get over it is to stand tall and realize that you're still learning, make a list of things you didn't know (stirrups etc..) and make sure you know for next time.

    Far too often, nursing (and medicine) is learned through failure. Just keep pushing yourself to do better next time.
  4. by   Ariesbsn
    God do I hate that! There is nothing that quite as deflating as doing your best only to have the doc say something like that to you.

    One way to deal with that is to say to the doc "let me get a nurse with more experience" and then bellow for help early on.

    Then, after everything has settled, make a list of the things you didn't know how to do and go to your supervisor and ask them to help you become proficient with them before the next crisis. Don't let them push you off by telling you not to worry, you'll get it with time. Explain that to better serve the patient, you would rather learn the stuff in a non-urgent setting.

    The other thing is, for some reason, certain doctors tend to think that they only have to say the words and things appear. Sunday night, we had a pt that needed an art line and a TLC. 3 experienced nurses were setting up and it wasn't fast enough for him. Every 30 seconds or so he would want to know where his art line set up was.

    BTW, I get all deer in the headlights looking in situations where someone is barking at me to do things and I don't even know where to find the equipment. It does get better.
  5. by   Shamira Aizza
    The reason this physician was getting "all worked up" was because he was not any more prepared (either emotionally or clinically, or both), than you were for the impending situation.

    Don't focus on how it made you feel, because that will eat your insides for weeks...but instead focus on what items you can address that will make you improve on your performance next time. You will find great satisfaction in being your own best teacher instead of focusing on being JUST your own worst critic.
  6. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Don't slam yourself too hard. We all have been there. You are learning and it takes time to get it all right. Just don't let these experiences stymie you and if you are being verbally-berated, just calmly take the dr aside and remind him/her you are learning and will be happy to hear any hints/advice he/she has to help you become more efficient. Puts the ball in their court and shows you are not defensive, but willing to be proactive and a valuable member of the team.

    Hang in there; I have been where you are. It's not fun, but you will get through.
  7. by   Gennaver
    Quote from Shamira Aizza
    The reason this physician was getting "all worked up" was because he was not any more prepared (either emotionally or clinically, or both), than you were for the impending situation.

    Don't focus on how it made you feel, ...
    Shamira Aizza,

    Thank you for this well worded and great advice.
    Gen
  8. by   GingerSue
    this is being said without any criticism of you:

    try to anticipate as much as possible what will be needed

    have a thorough orientation to all the equipment,
    know where everything is, and what's in the place and how it works

    if the doctor starts screaming, tell the doctor to stop it, it's not necessary, to get on track & you'll work together
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Good point about the dr not being prepared....this happens. That is why when they get all hot and bothered, I force myself to cool down and then address them at a more calm time. I have left no doubt that I will not tolerate being abused in the future. I am always one who owns what I have done wrong, also. This helps. But like I said, don't get too flustered and let this go. Learn from it what you can and move on.
  10. by   KJRN79
    Quote from leosrain
    Far too often, nursing (and medicine) is learned through failure. Just keep pushing yourself to do better next time.

    EXACTLY!!! It's one of the ways we learn on our feet, unfortunately! But it still doesn't "feel good". Just go back and learn from it, figure out where everything is that was asked for, practice with it. Next time it will just be something else. There's ALWAYS something new to learn! That's why I can still love my job!
  11. by   Rizpah
    Docs like that are the reason I chose to stay in LTC when I got out of clinicals back in '96. I saw docs that screamed at the nurses for asking (what seemed like) logical questions to my inexperienced mind, then talk down about the "dumb" nurse in front of us students after she'd left the room. At our facility we have one doc we deal with as primary - it's great, SHE's great!
  12. by   ElvishDNP
    I have found that A LOT of docs compensate for what they don't know/can't do by projecting it onto the nurses (or anyone else around). Once I worked with a doc who wanted everything done yesterday during a crisis but when things calmed down he'd thank you for the good job you did.

    Still, when something happens where it seems like everything goes the opposite of how I want it to, I go back after it's all said & done and look for where the stirrups are (or whatever applies), I fiddle with whatever machine I couldn't get to work until I know it better, and just mentally rehearse for when that happens next time.

    What you describe has happened to every good nurse I know at least once. I used to go home & beat myself up about it until I developed a thick backside that could withstand some chewing, lol. Sometimes things happen because I could've done something better, sometimes it was the doc, sometimes it was something completely out of anyone's control....like the SROM you described! Hang in there & know that it will be better the next time around.
  13. by   Spidey's mom
    Quote from hoping to be an rn
    ok just when i am trying to get a little self confidence in my job and feeling a little bit more comfortable..in comes a 20 smthing weeker....breech, srom'd, take her back for a section but the baby is right there...the doc starts yelling for this and that...those stirrups which i totally did not know how to set up in the or..nitro..pit, pump,.forceps...which i could not find...and saying can we get someone in here that knows what they are doing...ughhhh....when the docs get all worked up and screaming and yelling i go into shutdown mode and i am like duhhhhh...how do i get over this???? or do you...
    I am confused about your post.

    Your name is "hoping to be an rn". Are you a RN yet? What was your role back in surgery? Where was the circulating nurse who knows where all this stuff is? Where was anesthesia? Where was the other doc? (there have to be 2 in our hospital for a cesarean). Where was the surgical tech?

    It sounds like you and the doc were alone in surgery.

    steph
  14. by   33-weeker
    First off, you shouldn't have been by yourself in that situation until you've had more experience. Grab someone next time something like that is going down. Not fussing at you, just giving my 2c worth and perhaps a different perspective. Always plan ahead for the unexpected. It's better to have extra hands and not need them than the reverse.

    No one likes to be spoken to that way - even experienced nurses. But the negative comments that bug us the most are the ones we feel their is some truth to. As a newbie, you worry you won't be able to handle a crisis. Your fear was at least somewhat validated by that experience. That's why it nags at you. But don't let it get you down. We've ALL had those ughhh moments. You have to accept you are learning and use experiences like this one as opportunities to learn and grow.

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