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leosrain

leosrain BSN, RN

ICU, med/surg
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leosrain has 2 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU, med/surg.

Registered Nurse working in an ICU

leosrain's Latest Activity

  1. As part of treating the "C" in ABCs, Giving blood/fluids will increase blood pressure, and therefore perfusion to the brain. Without brain perfusion, tissue dies. It's not uncommon for traumatic brain injury patients to have high blood pressure goals--this will make sure blood gets to the injured tissue and prevents further secondary injury. So, treat the blood pressure ASAP. Better yet, give the blood to treat hypovolemia and find out if you can open up the EVD to decrease ICP. With an EVD, there's no reason why you can't treat the hypovolemia and ICP at the same time. Look up CPP (central perfusion pressure) and how it's calculated. CPP is arguably the most importand factor in treating brain injury. It requires a high BP and a low ICP. If you understand CPP and how it can fluctuate and be treated, everything will fall into place.
  2. leosrain

    G/J tube

    That was my first thought too! core0 is right....feed through J, decompress through G. It must be sucking out tube feed as it tries to pass through the jejunum. J goes to jejunum G goes to stomach
  3. leosrain

    First relatively big mistake... can't stop crying

    I don't know if I read your post right, but it sounded like the doctor ordered the heparin to be d/c. Perfect nurses see a d/c order like that and instantly know it's not right and question it--every single time! Nobody's perfect though...Including the doctor in this case! Remember, the doctor ordered it to be discontinued. It's his/her mistake to share. If nurses are going to take 100% responsibility for every single order, we may as well fire all the doctors and put in orders ourself! But, you see, there's a reason we don't do things like order heparin drips, or develop plans to bridge to coumadin: we don't have the same specialized training. Yes, it's a nurse's job to question orders, but this is a very subjective art that takes an entire career to master--and even then, erroneous orders can slip through the cracks. We need to stop taking the whole weight of a doctor's responsibilities on our shoulders. And Doctors need to stop casually putting in orders with the assumption that nurses will catch mistakes. One last point. Why was that nurse calling you at home? a) She should be calling the doctor to clarify the order, not you! You didn't put in the order, the doctor did. It wasn't your order to clarify!!! b) If she wanted to tell you that you made an error (rub it in?), she could have done it on the next shift. I suspect she was just doing it to boost her own ego for catching an error. Anyway, I just wanted to stand up for you a little bit. This mistake was not as big as you are probably thinking. Like everyone has mentioned...you will never make that mistake again. Nurses frequently learn from horrible failures. What an incredible way to learn!!!
  4. leosrain

    New Graduates In The Icu?

    Hey there! I'm just orienting to the ICU currently after about 2 years on med-surg. I just wanted to add to the comment above. There is an UNBELIEVABLE amount of information thrown at new ICU employees. I'm noticing that there have been things I have had to ask a couple times before getting a full grasp. There have been a couple times where I asked a question, received the answer, fully understood the answer....and then a couple days later needed to ask the same question again in order to reinforce my learning. Hearing and understanding does not equal memorization. Here's one anecdote: The other day I stood there staring at the monitor at the beginning of my shift. I started laughing out loud. My preceptor asked me what I was laughing at. I told him, "I've printed out an ECG strip at least 20 times...and now I'm sitting here drawing a blank...I can't remember how to do it!!" We had a good laugh, and I felt silly when I was reminded that there's a giant "graph" button on the front of the machine. Good nurses focuses learning resources for information...not on memorizing every last bit of detail. Better nurses than me still have to look up things that are fairly simple just to make sure...
  5. leosrain

    New Graduates In The Icu?

    Hey there! I'm just orienting to the ICU currently after about 2 years on med-surg. I just wanted to add to the comment above. There is an UNBELIEVABLE amount of information thrown at new ICU employees. I'm noticing that there have been things I have had to ask a couple times before getting a full grasp. There have been a couple times where I asked a question, received the answer, fully understood the answer....and then a couple days later needed to ask the same question again in order to reinforce my learning. Hearing and understanding does not equal memorization. Here's one anecdote: The other day I stood there staring at the monitor at the beginning of my shift. I started laughing out loud. My preceptor asked me what I was laughing at. I told him, "I've printed out an ECG strip at least 20 times...and now I'm sitting here drawing a blank...I can't remember how to do it!!" We had a good laugh, and I felt silly when I was reminded that there's a giant "graph" button on the front of the machine. Good nurses focuses learning resources for information...not on memorizing every last bit of detail. Better nurses than me still have to look up things that are fairly simple just to make sure...
  6. leosrain

    First Day in ICU tomorrow

    I was wondering the exact same thing! :)
  7. leosrain

    What do you like about being an ICU RN?

    Here's a secret... Try to find out by word of mouth what your manager's research interests are (usually managers have a Masters or PhD), or perhaps what projects they are working on for the unit. For example, my ICU manager did her research on family care, and she was working on many programs to support families. So, it was easy for me to integrate the idea that I was interested in helping families cope in difficult times, support them, etc. etc. Make sense? Or if their interest is more technical, talk about how you are interested in the technical aspects. Otherwise, truly soul search and see if you can put your desires into words. I know, it's super hard!
  8. leosrain

    sick time

    I think there needs to be a fair balance. On the one hand, employees should be able to call in sick without harassment, and on the other hand employees shouldn't take advantage. The challenge is finding the balance. Since I had seven sick days last year, I made a resolution to call in less than that! I already used two for a cold...darnit! :) Sean
  9. leosrain

    sick time

    Hi Jan! Knowing that we work in the same province and therefore contract, this surprises me. I have to admit that I don't know the rules regarding sick days, but nobody is every punished on my unit for sick calls. I called in sick seven times last year on three different incidents...and as a result felt SO guilty. I was sure I would be talked to, but nobody said a word. I think the Calgary Health Region is SO short-staffed that they're afraid to say anything. There's a general attitude these days of "do what you will, I'll just go work on a different unit." The units need nurses more than the nurses need the unit. We have almost TOO much power.... I just wish we would actually use it to affect some positive change!!! I'm still waiting for mandated nurse/patient rations like California. Don't worry, my breath isn't being held... Sean
  10. Here in Calgary, Alberta, the norm is to work either a day/night or day/evening rotation. I actually like my day/night...I don't think I would want to work all one or the other. I like changing--makes life interesting. Sean
  11. leosrain

    Calgary nurses and the UofC

    I was a student at the U of C three years ago. I have never heard of anything like this. *shrug* Plus, my clinical experiences were almost always very positive.
  12. leosrain

    What do you have most difficulty with in your everyday job?

    Lack of control! The following people make all the decisions: Doctors, admitting, administration, patients, family. I am only able to say, "I think x would be best, and can we do y?" I'm never actually able to make decisions. I am only on the receiving end of everyone else's decisions. Nursing has a long way to go before it finds itself autonomous. Sean
  13. leosrain

    The director is the spawn of Satan

    Just remember: the number of students going from 64 to 19 is not a reflection of the student's intelligence or work ethic. It is more the program's inability to actually teach these students the material. I really don't think they should be bragging about it! Find a way to work with the system and you'll get by! Pay no attention to the scare tactics.
  14. leosrain

    Nursing theory-Do you use it at work?

    I think this is a GREAT list! It is a very telling sign that nursing theory DOES trickle down to the bedside. There isn't one thing on that list (except for maternal-infant attachment) that I don't use on a daily basis! As for a previous post. I am a bedside nurse and I use and appreciate nursing theory. I can name many theorists and how I use their ideas in practice (see above list for examples). I have an appreciation for liberal arts and humanities. I love philosophy and sociology. I love complex ways that scholars have interpreted this world. I see these passions as only contributing to my practice; they certainly don't hinder.
  15. leosrain

    Nursing theory-Do you use it at work?

    I also use Neuman's systems model (I think that's the correct spelling). However, I do use a simplified version. As part of my final Bachelor's of Nursing project, I created my own practice model/theory. There are those of us out there that use/appreciate nursing theory, even at the bedside.
  16. leosrain

    Calgary Canada, I have arrived

    I'm just upstairs from you on 102. General surgery/surgical oncology
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