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Nursing to Med School

Posted

Has anyone actually considered this path? If so, currently where are you now?

Are you in Nursing school still in hopes to continue on with the education?

What is your opinion on it?

NO NO NO NO times infinity No lol

Statistically it is the worst degree path (MCAT and practicality wise) to go straight from nursing to med school and here is why.

1. Wasting your time, most of the nursing curriculum besides basic basic patho/pharm is not going to apply to medicine at all plus you are taking a seat from someone who wants to be an RN

2. Your classes don't count, almost none of the pre-nursing classes count for anything when looking at the pre-med curriculum which means your summers will be swamped with pre-med classes

3. Statically nursing/allied health majors scored on average the lowest on the MCAT even lower than Music, English etc

5. Resentment, if you tell anyone while in nursing your plans to jump ship you will instantly be ostercised by peers and professors

6. 99% of people on here saying it is a great pathway to becoming a doc are blowing smoke and have never tried it. It's the most convoluted and difficult of any path in my opinion

MY ADVICE:

Best option: Switch majors and go pre-med NOW, pick an easier degree and excel at the pre-reqs

OK option: Complete nursing degree work a few years then try and gut out the pre-reqs on your own time which is not easy

Terrible option: Try to do both while in school, your priorities will be in disarray

​Been there done that, I took partial pre-med curric in nursing school then more as a nurse while studying for the MCAT. If I had to do it over again I would have just switched majors because this is the least practical path imaginable trust me. I have friends who I went to college with who are already doctors, one a poly sci major and the other history. Nursing is too specialized of a degree and med school admissions officers will be suspicious why you left nursing and will suspect you will ditch medicine as well. Exact words from a ADCOM to me...My pre med GPA is actually pretty good but I have lost years off of my life with work and school while taking hard science classes.

Edited by Dranger

Idiosyncratic, BSN, RN

Has 2 years experience.

I've heard it can be an alright option, but you're looking at a lot of pre reqs for pre med to do while in nursing. When I was going to the hospital a lot the nurses always loved the doctors that started out as nurses. But it takes a LOT of time.

I definitely want to become a Nurse, especially in the future. Was wondering if there is an age limit on Med School as stupid as that sounds? The high stress levels probably also take a toll on the body..

I am also thinking of becoming a NP.

I've thought about it. Not med school, but dental school. I can say that taking nursing pre-reqs IS a big waste of time because ultimately dental or med students have to major in bio, chem or some hard science .. which is the complete opposite of our nursing pre-reqs. If you know for sure that you want to go pre-med I would say do it now.

Me personally, I've always wanted to be a dentist but I'm scared of all the math classes I'd have to take PLUS I didn't want to spend 8+ years in school. I told myself if I don't get into nursing school the first time (or two), I'm just gonna change my major. I honestly want to do both but that's not possible. Since I've already went through most of my nursing pre-reqs and almost done I'm gonna go through with that. If I make it into nursing school I do want to get my masters degree to become an NP tho.

I've thought about it. Not med school' date=' but dental school. I can say that taking nursing pre-reqs IS a big waste of time because[u'] ultimately dental or med students have to major in bio, chem or some hard science[/u] .. which is the complete opposite of our nursing pre-reqs. If you know for sure that you want to go pre-med I would say do it now.

Me personally, I've always wanted to be a dentist but I'm scared of all the math classes I'd have to take PLUS I didn't want to spend 8+ years in school. I told myself if I don't get into nursing school the first time (or two), I'm just gonna change my major. I honestly want to do both but that's not possible. Since I've already went through most of my nursing pre-reqs and almost done I'm gonna go through with that. If I make it into nursing school I do want to get my masters degree to become an NP tho.

Wrong, one of the biggest myths regarding pre-med. About 50% of accepted med students did NOT major in a science. Actually med schools are pushing for more well-rounded applicants which means lots of acceptances are going to humanities majors. They are even changing the MCAT to reflect this. All you need is the basic pre-med or recommended classes and you are good

I definitely want to become a Nurse, especially in the future. Was wondering if there is an age limit on Med School as stupid as that sounds? The high stress levels probably also take a toll on the body..

I am also thinking of becoming a NP.

No age limits, but cost/benefit analysis says the younger the better however I am sure ADCOMs places some admissions weight to a 27 year old compared to a 58 year old. Going to med school at 60 means you probably have a 5-7 year practicing window....maybe.

If you stay as a nursing major just go NP

HelloWish, ADN, BSN

Specializes in IMCU, Oncology. Has 3 years experience.

This doesn't sound like the best route to take. I would either go to med school or PA school or nursing and then become a nurse practitioner.

I agree with most of the other posters who say its not a good idea. Consider becoming a DNP. That way you have the nurse degree and the DR title. That's what I plan to do because I want to be called a DR but I def don't want to be in school with nothing to show until the end

I agree with most of the other posters who say its not a good idea. Consider becoming a DNP. That way you have the nurse degree and the DR title. That's what I plan to do because I want to be called a DR but I def don't want to be in school with nothing to show until the end

LOL put that Dr. on your jacket and go around the hospital calling yourself Dr., see how that works out. I am sure physicians will love that. Also patient confusion to the umpteenth degree. You want to be a doctor or physician then go to med school.

DNP ≠ MD/DO...not even close. The DNP is a doctorate but in a clinical setting it is straight deceiving to go around calling yourself doctor, call yourself whatever you want in your free time.

Going to get your DNP because you want to be called doctor is just as bad as the guy who wants to wear the Ranger Tab in the Army just so people can call him a Ranger. It's all about yourself.

I agree with most of the other posters who say its not a good idea. Consider becoming a DNP. That way you have the nurse degree and the DR title. That's what I plan to do because I want to be called a DR but I def don't want to be in school with nothing to show until the end

1) Okay, chasing after a career JUST because you want to be called doctor is ridiculous.

2) You need to assess the reasons you want to be a DNP.

3) So what reasons do you want the DNP...? Is it seriously to be called Doctor?

mclennan, BSN, RN

Specializes in CCM, PHN. Has 8 years experience.

I have a friend who was an RN for 4 years, then went to medical school. She is in her 3rd year and really having a tough time. She feels she isn't taken "seriously" by her colleagues, instructors, etc. because she doesn't have a degree in a "hard" science like Chem, Bio, etc. She tells me Nursing is really looked down upon by some medical school faculty. Plus she is in her mid 30s and doesn't really fit in with the 20-somethings that make up the majority of her class. So take that at face value.

Eh, I don't agree with getting a DNP just to be called doctor. However, for the ones who work hard enough for a doctorate in any degree/path deserve to be called doctor, whether it's DNP, MD, a doctorate in education, etc. There's a principal at an elementary school in my area with a doctorate, and thus is referred to as Dr. so and so. Did it confuse the kids? Sure, for about 10 minutes while it was being explained at an assembly at the beginning of the year.

As far as confusion for patients, it's an opportunity for education. Although honestly, what do DNPs call themselves? I don't think I've met a DNP. Do they or would they get crap from MDs for calling themselves doctor (since they do in fact have a doctorate) sure, maybe, probably, depends on the physician. But who cares.

its an impractical way to go. nursing school takes about 4 years to get to, ironically just to receive your associates, and then you'll need another 2 years to get your bachelors which depending on where you are/where you want to work, youll generally need to get to find a job.

In addition, nothing youve learned from nursing will really help you as far as med school curriculum goes. I always heard people comparing NPs and PAs saying their main difference in schooling is that NPs learn from a nursing model, whereas PAs learn from a medical model like MDs do. I didnt really understand what that was suppose to mean up until i started nursing school and now i understand fully, and i truly loathe the nursing model in comparison to the medical model (i was formerly a paramedic, so this is a painful transition for me but thats neither here nor there)

take into consideration med school will be 4 yrs itself plus maybe a year (With summers) to take any ofyour science pre reqs you may not have gotten from your ADN/BSN or that mayve expired, and another 3 yrs of residency you may be burnt out from the..16-17 years of school you're about to endure

the only practical reason i can see for doing this is i guess if you want to work/save some money to pay for med school, but lets face it, if you want a decent education to get a good paying job, life revolves around loans--a debt that youll be racked with at the end of such an arduous journey

but its your journey nonetheless, and with sheer force of will, im sure itll all be worth it for you in the end if its really what you want.

My 2 pesos.:)

If you have a doctorate, call yourself doctor (don't care about the "confusion" thing, PhDs were "doctor" first, so if ther's confusion, physicians need to fix it.)

But, if you just want to be called "doctor so-and-so" you can get that pretty quick off the internet. Often from the same places you can get ordained.

Sincerely,

Reverend Wooh

I'm doing the opposite, I have pre med degree and now I'm going for my BSN...So few of the classes translate over. Like yes, we both take microbiology but I took 475 in college and needed to take 250 to apply to nursing school. I took pharmacology but premed pharmacology is completely different than nursing pharmacology and so on. If you want to be a doctor save yourself the headache of trying to transfer classes and just go to med school lol.

And to answer the question in your original post, yes (at least now) I want to continue on with my education and maybe get my MSN or DNP...But I say this before I even start nursing school lol...Being a nurse or a NP is completely different than being a doctor, like others have said. If you know you want to be a doctor, why even bother going to nursing school?

queserasera, RN

Has 5 years experience.

Have a good ol' fashioned "Come to Jesus" moment with yourself and figure out why you think practicing nursing before becoming a doctor is a good idea. Also, why you'd want to be a nurse or doctor without the other attached

My two cents: Nursing school is tough, Med School pre reqs are tough, Med School is tough. Why not subtract a tough or two from the equation and just pick one or the other. It may seem like a good idea (for experience, as a fall back, idk) to do nursing as your undergrad, but I've looked into it and it just seems like it would be a nightmare. If you're 100% on being a doctor get a degree you're passionate about/ inherently good at and do well in it.

If you don't know what the hell you want to be. That's okay too. In the end, the choice is yours. There is no right or wrong way to do life. We're so trapped in a groupthink of "Well you can only be one thing" and I think people have more talents than pigeon holing themselves to one career.

The answers you'd be getting on here would be much different say, if you were a nurse who'd worked for X number of years, already had all of your med school pre reqs out of the way with a 3.5 GPA or higher, scored a 30+ on your MCATS, and had a story of passion about wanting to be the doctor you never saw in the hospital. People would probably be telling you to do it.

Everyones path is unique and sometimes you've got to bend a norm. Good luck with whatever you decide.