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Nursing managers, do tell!

Posted

When I graduated school I took the first job that came at me because the market was very difficult. Post acute rehab. When I started I had at most 15-17 post acute patients; however, the acuity is getting increasingly worse and my patient load has increased to 25 patients and most recently they tell us 27 is our max now.

I have 2nd day post op admissions, outpatient er for iv antibiotics, currently have 3 woundvacs on my assignment ( which I successfully know how to redress and fix machine malfunction... I've dealt with them so long now.) bid dressing changes for packing wounds, jp drains, colostomies, foleys... You name it... I do it. By myself!

I have quickly lost faith in this company as they have increased our patient load due to money constraints ... And I've been trying for years to get into medical surgical but I quickly get told that my experience isn't equivalent! I'm a BSN I start ivs, foleys, do wound care, you name it!

So as a nurse manager, how does a rehab nurse break into acute care nursing? I'm really curious! Because I've done this for four years, have I paid my dues?

AnthonyD

Specializes in Critical Care, Med-Surg. Has 7 years experience.

I'm not a nurse manager, but I can't see why you couldn't get an acute care med/surg job with your experience. I mean, new grads are hired into med/surg every day. Certainly, I would think you would be hireable. What's the job market like in your area? Have you even gotten an interview?

sallyrnrrt, ADN, RN

Specializes in critical care, ER,ICU, CVSURG, CCU.

You have paid your dues....

you do have solid experience.....

best wishes

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

I work in a post-acute rehab setting and several of our floor nurses have left us for acute care hospital positions in recent months. I suppose your job quandaries might be related to your location.

Some hospital nurse managers are unaware of the range of skills that those of us in post-acute settings possess. My advice is to emphasize your procedural skill set in a professional cover letter. Good luck to you!

turnforthenurse, MSN, NP

Specializes in ER, progressive care. Has 7 years experience.

I think you have solid experience. Have you tried applying to acute care positions in your area?

Yep, I agree with the others... Dues are paid and you have the experience. Just try and apply! You are definitely an asset! Good luck:)

I'm not a nurse manager, but I can't see why you couldn't get an acute care med/surg job with your experience. I mean, new grads are hired into med/surg every day. Certainly, I would think you would be hireable. What's the job market like in your area? Have you even gotten an interview?

I've had two... One in which I got because the Dons family member was my patient and she got me an interview with hr right away and nothing panned out because hr said I'd be considered a "new grad" -____-

I work in a post-acute rehab setting and several of our floor nurses have left us for acute care hospital positions in recent months. I suppose your job quandaries might be related to your location.

Some hospital nurse managers are unaware of the range of skills that those of us in post-acute settings possess. My advice is to emphasize your procedural skill set in a professional cover letter. Good luck to you!

I work in California, very tough market! But the one interview I got in Cali they told me I would be considered a new grad because I only have post acute care experience 😕

Thank you everyone for the motivational and kind responses 😊

AnthonyD

Specializes in Critical Care, Med-Surg. Has 7 years experience.

Would it be a significant pay cut to start in acute care as a "new grad?" Maybe it would be worthwhile to look into it.

Would it be a significant pay cut to start in acute care as a "new grad?" Maybe it would be worthwhile to look into it.

I was very willing but nothing panned out. I think all of that training would be incredibly valuable!

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Some hospital nurse managers are unaware of the range of skills that those of us in post-acute settings possess. My advice is to emphasize your procedural skill set in a professional cover letter. Good luck to you!

As I started reading your post, I was thinking this even before I read Commuter's response. She's right, You really have to HARD SELL yourself in your cover letter & resume. And if your references could elaborate on your skills --- can't hurt!

From what I've read here on AN, California is a really tough job market. But little pockets of opportunity open up occ. Sell yourself on paper - your tech skills sound strong.

Good luck to you.

As I started reading your post, I was thinking this even before I read Commuter's response. She's right, You really have to HARD SELL yourself in your cover letter & resume. And if your references could elaborate on your skills --- can't hurt!

From what I've read here on AN, California is a really tough job market. But little pockets of opportunity open up occ. Sell yourself on paper - your tech skills sound strong.

Good luck to you.

I am doing just that! I recontacted HR and she forwarded my resume to the unit. I then found out an old co-worker works there so she had told her boss about me. Her boss stated, "I am reluctant to hire SNF nurses because I haven't had good experiences doing so in the past." But she is willing to view my resume. Rolling my eyes hard over here. But, I'll take what I can get. E-mailing it ASAP!