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Nursing is not what it is made out to be..

Nurses   (18,720 Views | 102 Replies)

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You are reading page 7 of Nursing is not what it is made out to be... If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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Very well said, brandy1017. I am an older person who returned to clinical nursing to update my assessment skills as preparation for FNP school. I was warned about the current nursing culture and she was spot on. It is vicious. Nurses (not all but most) are aggressively mean. Not just rude. I'm talking using energy to be mean to other nurses. Making fun of another in front of other nurses and humiliating another in front of patients. Very cliquish and definitely straight outta junior high.

It is disappointing to say the least.

I don't say this to indicate I don't believe you, I'm just sincerely curious -- where do all of you people who talk about what horrible experiences you've had in nursing work?? I've been in nursing >30 yrs, in now five different states, too many employers/facilities to keep track of without actually looking at my CV, and I can probably count of the fingers of one hand the number of seriously, consistently unpleasant coworkers and bosses I've encountered in my career. I've never worked anywhere where my coworkers were "using energy to be mean to other nurses. Making fun of another in front of other nurses and humiliating another in front of patients. Very cliquish and definitely straight outta junior high." Sure, the work is hard, physically as well as mentally/psychologically; lots of the clients make you want to beat your head against the wall; the bosses have a lot of more-or-less-unrealistic expectations and demands; but not the kind of generally toxic relationships with coworkers that I hear so many people complain about in threads like this one. For the most part, I've had positive relationships with colleagues and we've worked together to support each other in getting through the day. Maybe it's just dumb luck on my part.

If I had found myself consistently, repeatedly in the kind of toxic work environment I hear so many people describe on this site as the general state of nursing, I would have left nursing a long time ago and found something else to do. I wouldn't just keep putting up with it.

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GermanCookie has 3 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Emergency Department.

23 Posts; 638 Profile Views

I think the OP had a difficult day and was venting. I wish this board was a little more like a duvet and a little less like a brick wall sometimes. While I completely agree that this is a public forum and that comments and opinions were solicited by the original posting, I'm willing to bet that there are plenty of us who have had days just like the OP and may be hesitant to express that after reading the majority of these comments.

I've had days where I get in my car and swear I'm never, ever coming back again. :nailbiting: Then I get home, sit down and watch a movie with a glass of sweet tea, the cat sticks her tail in my face while purring (does anyone know how to stop that? :sarcastic: ) and all is well in my world again.... and I get ready for the next day.

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15 Posts; 809 Profile Views

Consider yourself truly blessed and lucky to consistently have worked in pleasant conditions. I worked as a nurse in the clinical setting for many years then went to a desk job as I thought I was getting too old for the pace. I enjoyed my desk job but wanted patient interaction and I missed taking care of them. Now, returning to the clinical area I find the culture just as my friend (who is the same age) told me it would be. I originally thought she was exaggerating or just was overly sensitive. But, her words have rung true. I like the word "toxic" you used as it describes it very well. I hate my job but I love my patients. I will love taking care of them in a different role as a FNP in the future.

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GermanCookie has 3 years experience as a ADN, BSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in Emergency Department.

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If only people were more like dogs.

This. :cheeky:

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bgxyrnf has 10 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Med-Tele; ED; ICU.

1,208 Posts; 11,039 Profile Views

I became very discouraged a while back and almost went back to school to become an engineer; the only reason I didn't is because I heard so much about the opposite, engineers wanting to become nurses (or doctors). I'm glad now that I found a nursing role that was a better fit for me.

As a former engineer, I can tell you that changing to nursing was one of the best choices I've ever made.

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Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

8 Followers; 32 Articles; 13,353 Posts; 130,327 Profile Views

I think the OP had a difficult day and was venting. I wish this board was a little more like a duvet and a little less like a brick wall sometimes. While I completely agree that this is a public forum and that comments and opinions were solicited by the original posting, I'm willing to bet that there are plenty of us who have had days just like the OP and may be hesitant to express that after reading the majority of these comments.

I've had days where I get in my car and swear I'm never, ever coming back again. :nailbiting: Then I get home, sit down and watch a movie with a glass of sweet tea, the cat sticks her tail in my face while purring (does anyone know how to stop that? :sarcastic: ) and all is well in my world again.... and I get ready for the next day.

That was why I mentioned making it a VENT post in my initial response. I think we're used to seeing those and know how to temper our responses accordingly. :)

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

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I don't say this to indicate I don't believe you, I'm just sincerely curious -- where do all of you people who talk about what horrible experiences you've had in nursing work?? I've been in nursing >30 yrs, in now five different states, too many employers/facilities to keep track of without actually looking at my CV, and I can probably count of the fingers of one hand the number of seriously, consistently unpleasant coworkers and bosses I've encountered in my career. I've never worked anywhere where my coworkers were "using energy to be mean to other nurses. Making fun of another in front of other nurses and humiliating another in front of patients. Very cliquish and definitely straight outta junior high." Sure, the work is hard, physically as well as mentally/psychologically; lots of the clients make you want to beat your head against the wall; the bosses have a lot of more-or-less-unrealistic expectations and demands; but not the kind of generally toxic relationships with coworkers that I hear so many people complain about in threads like this one. For the most part, I've had positive relationships with colleagues and we've worked together to support each other in getting through the day. Maybe it's just dumb luck on my part.

If I had found myself consistently, repeatedly in the kind of toxic work environment I hear so many people describe on this site as the general state of nursing, I would have left nursing a long time ago and found something else to do. I wouldn't just keep putting up with it.

I've been a nurse for forty years, worked in five states in a number of different hospitals and I've never encountered more than two real bullies in all that time. I've never encountered coworkers "using energy to be mean to other nurses", making fun of or humiliating one another or "straight outta junior high". Sure, I've encountered some who were more or less clueless about teamwork, some managers with unrealistic expectations and some patients and family members who are toxic. I'm not sure it's just dumb luck on your part (or mine); I think it's the result of working at workplace relationships rather than just expecting something from a workplace relationship that isn't realistic and being unhappy when it isn't forthcoming.

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75 Posts; 2,826 Profile Views

I somewhat agree with the OP. Nursing is very romanticized, especially during nursing school. The reality is quite different...

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E-commerce has 1 years experience as a CNA, LVN and specializes in Psychiatric, Diabetes advocate.

1,667 Posts; 29,100 Profile Views

I somewhat agree with the OP. Nursing is very romanticized, especially during nursing school. The reality is quite different...

As I mention in another post ...you will be free when you break the myth that a job will bring internal happiness.

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275 Posts; 5,356 Profile Views

I've tried on several occasions to sway unsuspecting friends and family members from going to nursing school. I hate to discourage people, but certainly there are better ways to make a living. :/ I do appreciate the redeeming aspects of nursing; taking care of patients offers some of the most interesting & satisfying work around, you can meet and work with some pretty awesome people, it's very flexible as far as the kind of work you can do, and the pay is okay/decent, especially if you have seniority. All that being said, I can honestly say I'm not sure it's worth the emotional and physical bludgeoning you take nearly every time you walk through the hospital door. Chronic understaffing makes already difficult work a lot harder--and it hurts the patients--and that just *sucks.* I like being at bedside, but I'm SO glad I'm not just starting out. Due to finances I have a number of years in front of me (God willing), but at least there is light at the end of the nursing tunnel. I can't imagine doing this another 20. OMG.

I second this outlook on the future of nursing. Hierarchical power structures have been put in place by corporate health care that largely favor physicians above their own employees due to their ability to generate revenue. I've witnessed, on more than one occasion, hospital administration turning a blind eye on MD practitioners who are mostly inept and others who are tyrants that consistently berate staff and are verbally abusive. I've posted this before, but after 25 years of active practice, my recommendation to a young person is NOT to pursue nursing as a career choice-perhaps advanced practice, but never acute care, hospital nursing! Instead, get a different four year degree and become an engineer, CPA.....waaaay better hours, working environment, respect, pay, fewer weekends, holiday. Just my opinion

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79 Posts; 1,298 Profile Views

"Do a google search for 'the truth about nursing' and see what comes up. This is a great way to see just how awful the nursing profession is. "

I haven't had an actual account here for very long and already I'm seeing a pattern. Who's to say this person isn't the creator of the aforementioned website making an inflammatory comment to get traffic. C'mon! Puh-lease! Is this what this forum is about?! I joined because I'm eager to become an RN, not to have to critically read and "consider the source" every time I read something.

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3 Posts; 180 Profile Views

I have been a nurse for 16 years and I am in my 40's as well and I can definitely relate. To those who are not nurses I don't feel you have room to talk. To those who are and feel differently I'm glad your experience has been different. However, the comment overall is true. This can be found by doing any small amount of research about the nursing profession and the stated reasons for burnout or leaving the profession. All nursing boards are aware and are working to find solutions. It may be offensive to some to hear this about their profession but it is non the less true.

The problem is that it's not what I signed up for. In school they tell you about delegating but in the real world there is no one to delegate to most times. Further, why am I held accountable for a mistake of my superior? No, that's craziness and you don't find that in other professions. Moreover, bedside nurses are overloaded with tasks and held accountable for most things concerning patient care yet they have NO say so in developing patient care policies and standards. By and large they are taught to allow themselves to be disrespected by doctors who can be abrasive, loud and down out right ugly. We are taught to overlook their behavior as "boys behaving badly" so to speak rather than developing a"0" tolerance. To respond in a way other than tolerance causes reprimand of the nurse, instead of the perpetrator.

Lastly, with JCO core measures and ACA pay for performance there has been even more tasks added to nurses plates; yet there has been very little income growth over the last 20 years. The starting salary of newer nurses is only a few dollars more than it was when I started 16 years ago. The profession overall is disrepected and I believe its because it is a female dominated profession where showing compassion has been portrayed as the main skill rather than promoting health and saving lives. But of course if that's a nurses platform then what will doctors be known for?

To those of you who say leave.....It's not your profession to allow me in or put me out. I EARNED the right to be here. I love caring for patients. I hate the circumstances in which I have to do it.

Edited by srntrvlr
Errors in spelling

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