Seattle Children's Hospital / Living in Seattle

  1. Hi everyone!


    I just wanted to see if anyone has applied to Seattle Children's Hospital for their nurse residency program for August 2017. I received an email yesterday that I was offered an interview, so I will be flying out for that. I'm from Chicago, so I was just wondering if anyone has any insight on the hospital/Seattle living. It has always been a city I have considered about relocating to, but I would be making this move cross country without knowing anyone and as being a complete new grad. I know that many people do this, but I just wanted to get input on living in Seattle and the hospital, if possible! I am interviewing for a neonatal ICU position, so if anyone has any input on that, that would be welcomed as well!
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  2. Visit LanaLasch13 profile page

    About LanaLasch13, BSN

    Joined: Mar '14; Posts: 3

    13 Comments

  3. by   Guttercat
    Seattle is currently the fastest growing city in the U.S....at it's already enormous. And have you looked at housing? It's outrageous. So is the traffic in the greater Seattle metro area, especially in and out of that neighborhood.

    If you make the move, I'd recommend researching housing and commute times very, very carefully. You have to understand that the entire Puget Sound corridor is a commuter's nightmare.

    If you fly out, plan to stay at least four days to get a feel of the area.
  4. by   LanaLasch13
    Thanks! I have been looking at housing and seeing what it's like. I'm staying for a few days and not just for my interview. I've been reading a lot about how Seattle isn't very open to transplants, would you say that's true, or just depends on the person? Obviously, I'd be coming from the midwest, which is completely different, especially Chicago where I feel like we are more blunt lol. Also, as someone who has been commuting to Chicago from the suburbs (hour ish commute) I have become well accustomed to commuting!
  5. by   kalycat
    I don't mean to minimize a Chi-town commute, but I've lived all over the country, including SoCal. Seattle traffic and commuting is literally the worst I've ever seen, complicated further by parking and lack of public transit. You may be able to minimize some of this by working off hours/shifts, but any days you're required to be there during business hours, plan well ahead. As far as being open to outsiders and being blunt... Seattle has a very specific culture. There's tons to do and I'm sure you will find your niche, but there is definitely a certain resistance on the part of hard core Seattieites to what is perceived as yuppie gentrification. Due to all the changes, a lot of the old Seattle character and edginess is shifting. People tend to be resistant to change when they see neighborhoods and hangouts they loved being replaced by chain stores and condos. A lot of this will depend on where you choose to live and where you choose to hang out. The good news is, since it's growing so quickly, you certainly won't be alone as a transplant. Good luck with your interview!
  6. by   WoosahRN
    I found people very welcoming. The biggest culture I noticed is people are less direct and more passive aggressive. Once I realized it I could figure out who was from WA and who was a transplant pretty quickly.

    Most people don't live in Seattle because it's so expensive. It's like people either commute or they live across the street. But we bought a home and my husband works far north so we live far north (our home would be more than double the price we paid if it was in Seattle).

    The city has really good public transportation though and the hospital has its own transportation department (meaning they help map out all the ways to get to the hospital) to enourage using public transportation (versus more cars on the road). The traffic here is the worst traffic I've ever lived in. I worked night shift and lived 35 miles away from work. It was an hour in, 45 min home and I live opposite of traffic. If I ever had to go there during the day it was 3-5 hours round trip. I grew up in Arizona and thought the weather traffic was bad. Now I miss AZ because here, a light drizzle causes traffic to crawl. It's insane. I always expect to see some big accident but nope. When I did clinicals there during the day I had to leave at 0530 to get there at 0800 because anything after 0530 and I found my commute was a solid two hours.
  7. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from LanaLasch13
    Thanks! I have been looking at housing and seeing what it's like. I'm staying for a few days and not just for my interview. I've been reading a lot about how Seattle isn't very open to transplants, would you say that's true, or just depends on the person? Obviously, I'd be coming from the midwest, which is completely different, especially Chicago where I feel like we are more blunt lol. Also, as someone who has been commuting to Chicago from the suburbs (hour ish commute) I have become well accustomed to commuting!
    Seattle isn't open to transplants from California, but otherwise no problem. There are (or were when I lived there) some very harsh feelings about Californians driving up the real estate prices. The people there are incredibly nice, but best to tone down the bluntness or you'll have difficulty there. I LOVED Seattle and eventually bought a house in the Shoreline area, which is more affordable and an easy commute downtown. You'll have to hunt for a place you can afford on your own -- or live with roommates at first. But Seattle is a wonderful place and well worth the effort.
  8. by   adventure_rn
    I enjoyed living in Seattle, although I don't know that I'd want to live there permanently due to the high cost of living. Even though the hospitals are unionized, the pay is still notoriously pretty low relative to the high cost of living. When I worked in Seattle my salary was $10/hr higher than my job in the South, but in the South I made about $20,000 more per year in savings (after tax) than I did in Seattle because of my living expenses.

    I haven't worked in the NICU at Children's, but I've known and worked with several people who do. It's a great place to learn; you'll see cases you won't see anywhere else, and you'll learn many skills that most NICU nurses don't have (i.e. managing ECMO patients, CRRT, etc.). However I will caution you that they do have a higher burn-out and turn-over rate than some other regional NICUs. You may or may not know that Children's does not have it's own delivery facilities; they are referral only, therefore the NICU takes only the sickest babies. Most NICUs are in hospitals that do deliveries; therefore, in addition to the handful of super-sick kids, the vast majority of the babies are only a bit premature. Deaths in most NICUs are very rare; deaths in a NICU like Children's are more common. In most NICUs, the babies stay on the unit until they go home, even when they're not actually 'sick' (they're just learning to eat); you get to watch your kids get better and go home. In contrast, the Children's NICU only has intensive care patients; when the kids start to get better, they go to step down or the floor. Therefore, you may not do as much feeding, holding, or cuddling because the kids simply aren't stable enough. Most NICUs are a mix of intensive care and 'baby med-surg' patients, whereas a place like Children's tends to have more true intensive care. In addition, Children's has relatively few preemies, and far more term kids with congenital anomalies. With Level IV experience at a NICU like Children's, you can work or travel just about anywhere in the future. However, realize that it is a very different environment from most NICUs, and that it may be more high-stress (both emotionally and professionally).
    Last edit by adventure_rn on Jun 6, '17
  9. by   kbrn2002
    I can't give any input as far as the hospital goes but as for the city itself I'm from that area and still have relatives in Seattle that I visit regularly. I would love to move back someday but frankly I can't afford to. The sticker shock on housing might not be as bad for you coming from Chicago as it would be for somebody moving from a smaller area but Holy Hannah the housing is outrageously expensive! Finding something affordable in the proximity of the hospital will be a challenge to say the least. If you drive expect the commute to be awful. I've driven in Chicago and Seattle and in my opinion Seattle is much worse. You will also need to factor in the cost to park which is of course also sky high. Public transport is ok, though not quite as good as Chicago's. If you live farther out which will certainly be more affordable look at your commute options carefully. Car, public transport or a combination of both is doable. You may need to rely at least partially on buses if you use public transport, train coverage is not nearly as comprehensive as it is in Chicago.

    On the plus side the weather is certainly better than Chicago. A negative is the distinct possibility of earthquakes. Not too common, but they do happen there. It is a beautiful city though. There is plenty to do and the people are friendly. Enjoy your visit there and good luck on the interview!
  10. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from kbrn2002
    I've driven in Chicago and Seattle and in my opinion Seattle is much worse. You will also need to factor in the cost to park which is of course also sky high. Public transport is ok, though not quite as good as Chicago's. If you live farther out which will certainly be more affordable look at your commute options carefully. Car, public transport or a combination of both is doable. You may need to rely at least partially on buses if you use public transport, train coverage is not nearly as comprehensive as it is in Chicago.
    I've had the experience of driving in Chicago, DC and Seattle and Chicago is worse than DC, in my opinion. Seattle is the best of the three. San Francisco is worse, LA is worse and NYC nearly gave me an emotional breakdown! I'd take Seattle over any of the above any time!
  11. by   kbrn2002
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    I've had the experience of driving in Chicago, DC and Seattle and Chicago is worse than DC, in my opinion. Seattle is the best of the three. San Francisco is worse, LA is worse and NYC nearly gave me an emotional breakdown! I'd take Seattle over any of the above any time!
    Agree about New York. My God that's awful to even WATCH . I didn't drive when I was there last year and after seeing that insanity I don't know why anybody who lives there even bothers owning a car.
    I still really dislike driving in Seattle though it's not too awful by the water. Downtown is pretty horrible though
  12. by   umichnurse17
    How did your interview go? I am from the midwest as well and I am coming out in August to interivew for the October Cohort!
  13. by   mooredaley
    Hello!
    I was wondering how the interview process went for the residency program, and if you were selected!
    About how many people were interviewed?
    I am flying to Seattle to interview for the March residency in 2 weeks and super curious about the whole process. If you did accept a position, how do you like the residency?
  14. by   Lynn94
    Hi! I am also flying out for this interview and wondering the same questions! Do you know if we are interviewing for specific units or one general interview based on which track we chose?

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