SHHHHH, dont tell anyone I'm a RN

  1. For the past four years I have worked as a CNA putting myself through school and I can officially say I am a RN. However-a few months ago my manager told me that I had to tell him immeadiately after passing my boards because I could not work for my organization as a tech if I'm a license nurse. I checked with my state BON and it says I can but I'm still avoiding him because I need my job. My nurse residency doesnt start for another month (at another location) and I still have bills to pay. Whats worst is that my co workers have been asking me, so I have been honest and tell them that I passed my boards but some of them have gone out of their way to question how do I still have a job as a tech where as the organization usually let techs go once they become nurses who are not staying with the company. I also wanted to stay with the same organization to earn some extra money prn because I'm sure I will not be eliegible for overtime for months at the new Hospital. I'm so confused right now because it's like I have to hide the fact I'm a nurse to justify my needs for survival.
    Last edit by Joe V on Aug 4
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    About Barbie8808

    Joined: Jul '15; Posts: 47; Likes: 54

    75 Comments

  3. by   jbeaves
    This is kind of a tricky ethical dilemma. If you are a licensed RN and one of the patients for whom you are working as a tech suddenly require your nursing expertise, you could be required to act as an RN which I assume is outside of your current job description.

    Our nursing program taught us that as RNs, working as a tech was below our scope of practice and recommended that if we continued to work outside of nursing while licensed, that it be outside of the medical field completely.

    I can't say 100% what the right thing is to do, but it seems reasonable to come forward to your boss with your current situation. Do you have a good enough relationship with him where he might be understanding that you cannot afford to be unemployed for a month while waiting for your new job to start?

    Wish I could help more, best of luck in whatever you decide to do.
  4. by   umbdude
    I don't see any dilemma here. Your manager asked that you do not work as a CNA after receiving your RN license, and that most likely is due to hospital policy. It you intentionally withhold that information so you can get more money, you are violating the policy and being dishonest. At best you're being unprofessional. It is not your hospital's responsibility or obligation to ensure your financial survival. I strongly recommend that you be honest so you don't burn bridges or worse.
  5. by   jbeaves
    dilemma
    noun
    a situation in which a difficult choice has to be made between two or more alternatives, especially equally undesirable ones.
    "the people often face the dilemma of feeding themselves or their cattle"
    synonyms: quandary, predicament, Catch-22, vicious circle, plight, mess, muddle;

    I mean, it seems like a dilemma to me. I threw in the ethical part as if you ignore the ethics, there would in fact be no dilemma. That said, I agree about coming forward.
  6. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from jbeaves
    Our nursing program taught us that as RNs, working as a tech was below our scope of practice and recommended that if we continued to work outside of nursing while licensed, that it be outside of the medical field completely.
    Your nursing program is incorrect. Everything that is within the scope of a CNA is within the scope of an RN. It is simply those tasks that can be delegated. It can, however, lead to issues with job description and the expectation that you would act as a prudent licensed nurse would act when involved in patient care.
  7. by   caliotter3
    Not a topic you should be discussing at length with coworkers. Should have invented a fib to tell them. Only responsibility you have here is to your employer and that is all you should have been worrying about. Now you have to consider whether or not coworker gossip will get to the ears of your employer before you bring up the subject on your own.
  8. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Barbie8808
    For the past four years I have worked as a CNA putting myself
    through school and I can officially say I am a RN. However-a few months ago my
    manager told me that I had to tell him immeadiately after passing my boards
    because I could not work for my organization as a tech if I'm a license nurse. I
    checked with my state BON and it says I can but I'm still avoiding him because I
    need my job. My nurse residency doesnt start for another month (at another
    location) and I still have bills to pay. Whats worst is that my co workers have
    been asking me, so I have been honest and tell them that I passed my boards but some of
    them have gone out of their way to question how do I still have a job as a
    tech where as the organization usually let techs go once they become nurses who
    are not staying with the company. I also wanted to stay with the
    same organization to earn some extra money prn because I'm sure I will not be
    eliegible for overtime for months at the new Hospital. I'm so confused right now because it's like I have to hide the fact I'm a nurse to justify my needs for survival.
    Maybe I have a lax conscious, but I'm OK with your secret. You're certainly not endangering any patients by having a higher level of education, and you're saving your manager from having to act by not telling them about your recent success.
    I was not a CNA when I finished nursing school, but my employer took me off the schedule immediately anticipating that I'd quickly find work as an RN. Thankfully, he was right. I was a little nervous for a few weeks not knowing if I'd have food or bus fare.
  9. by   jbeaves
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    Your nursing program is incorrect. Everything that is within the scope of a CNA is within the scope of an RN. It is simply those tasks that can be delegated. It can, however, lead to issues with job description and the expectation that you would act as a prudent licensed nurse would act when involved in patient care.
    I have to disagree. At least according to the Texas BON there are several rules to delegation including "the nursing task must not require the unlicensed person to exercise professional nursing judgment."

    Everything within a CNAs scope of practice may fall under a Nurse's scope, but it does not go both ways. Of course this may vary state to state, but it's a bit far to call my education wrong with that little information.

    Edit: after more closely reviewing your comment, I believe we may be arguing the same side. I was referring to a CNA's scope of practice being less than an RNs and how that would impact your ability to act as might be required by an RN if you were working as a CNA. I did not mean there is something he cannot do as an RN that a CNA could do as this is obviously false.
    Last edit by jbeaves on Jul 7
  10. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from jbeaves
    I have to disagree. At least according to the Texas BON there are several rules to delegation including "the nursing task must not require the unlicensed person to exercise professional nursing judgment."

    Everything within a CNAs scope of practice may fall under a Nurse's scope, but it does not go both ways. Of course this may vary state to state, but it's a bit far to call my education wrong with that little information.
    I think you misunderstood my post. I was referencing the nurse working in the role of a CNA, in which case no, they are not working outside of their scope. A license holder is a license holder regardless of the job title. If a nurse is working in the role of CNA, it is not at all outside of the scope of their license's practice.

    Again, the issue is if one is working in a job title of CNA but holding a nursing license, they will be held to the standard of that nursing license by the BON.
  11. by   jbeaves
    Quote from Rose_Queen
    I think you misunderstood my post. I was referencing the nurse working in the role of a CNA, in which case no, they are not working outside of their scope. A license holder is a license holder regardless of the job title. If a nurse is working in the role of CNA, it is not at all outside of the scope of their license's practice.

    Again, the issue is if one is working in a job title of CNA but holding a nursing license, they will be held to the standard of that nursing license by the BON.
    Yes, I believe we are making the same argument though my statement was certainly lacking some eloquence that may have caused the confusion.

    Scope of practice does not equal job description does not equal responsibilities afforded by license.
  12. by   JBudd
    You have to tell them. Since you haven't "seen" him, let him know now. Unprofessional to do otherwise, you were specifically asked to let him know. If he finds out another way, you never know what consequences he may pursue. Seriously, send him an email immediately, follow up in person, and ask to work out your "resignation" time.

    You don't need "lied to your boss" on your work record, you don't want to burn bridges with your current employer even if not planning to stay. You never know what may happen in the future, guard your reputation!!
  13. by   2cooldeans
    Your RN is public. Anyone can look it up online. However, I don't see a problem here. I have worked in a non RN role for a year and a half in a hospital. You simply work within your scope as employed. So don't touch IVs or do assessments or anything. You are not working as an RN while a CNA or an MA or anything. I see no conflict. And my bosses and co workers all know that Iam an RN.
  14. by   Newgradnurse17
    You need to tell him straight away. You've already told nurses there you've past, so I can guarantee you. he will find out before you month is up. And there will be consequences.

    He's told you already you can't work as a cna once licenced, and is obviously it's the hospitals policy if the nurses are surprised you are still allowed to work. Either you be honest and uphold your reputation or lie and get fired once he finds out and suffer the consequences. But both ways you won't be working for a month.

    I know you have bills to pay, maybe try sort something with your bank like an over draft or credit if needed. It's only a month, and then you'll be earning again. Plus he did let you know before you had done boards, so maybe you should have talk to him before about your situation, or sat boards slightly later, or sorted out a plan in advance. He gave you a few months notice!!!

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