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Nurses in trouble get second chances - Minnesota

Minnesota Article   (51,354 Views 52 Replies 596 Words)
by Brian Brian, ASN, RN (Member)

Brian has 16 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in CCU, Geriatrics, Critical Care, Tele.

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Front page lead story in the Sunday Star Tribune investigates the Disciplinary actions of the Minnesota State Board of Nursing. Minnesota rarely throws nurses out of the profession for unsafe conduct. Records examined by the Star Tribune of more than 1,000 disciplinary actions by the Nursing Board over the past four years show that it tolerates or forgives misconduct that would end nursing careers in other states. You are reading page 4 of Nurses in trouble get second chances - Minnesota. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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There's too much drama in nursing.

If so, it's often caused by things like jumping to conclusions based on a couple sentences. Like deciding:

But it sounds like the nurses didn't even take time to assess the situation/patient before leaving the room just to make sure things are safe. Sounds like a case of neglect.

If you think "nurses eat their young" then perhaps you should start changing that by not jumping to conclusions and making assumptions about a situation based on a couple sentences in a newspaper article.

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

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I have no idea why nurses would be expected to know how to react to an emergency. Nursing schools provide no training in dealing with emergencies.

Knowing how to respond in various emergencies is something learned on the job in acute care environments.

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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I have no idea why nurses would be expected to know how to react to an emergency. Nursing schools provide no training in dealing with emergencies. Knowing how to respond in various emergencies is something learned on the job in acute care environments.

Most environments, even outside of acute care, EXPECT nurses to know BLS and first aid...you should have SOME knowledge on how to respond to a emergency, especially if you need to do CPR-at least compressions on a pt who has a pacemaker. :blink:

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noc4senuf specializes in Geriatrics, WCC.

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As a DON who previously worked at homes in MN, I reported my fair share of nurses to the BON. Only one nurse ever lost her license for my report and that was due to stealing narcs. Two nurses were identified (and proven) of not giving a tube feeder their meds consistently over a period of months. One nurse who had taken off a month and hospitalized for a mental breakdown (not told to management), came back to work and a week later during her shift did not pass any meds, did no charting, called other floors for help (she had 14 residents), upset residents with her behavior that some discharged the following day and the BON did nothing with any of these. All were fired from the facility. This is just a small example. BUT, on the otherhand, if a nurse is delinquent on her taxes or has a disorderly conduct, the license is suspended. Just no common sense with the BON in MN.

In the meantime, now that I travel adn do consulting and temp DON work, I get to see what goes on outside the area. In Kentucky, a nurse is sitting in prison for 9 years for manslaughter. He was told a coupel times by a CNA that a resident had achange of condition. He did not go check the resdident until a couple of hours later. The resident was a Full Code on a rehab unit. WHen he finally went to check, the resident had expired. He did not do CPR. he later stated as his excuse was that the resident was old. Go figure.

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

68,994 Profile Views; 5,143 Posts

Most environments, even outside of acute care, EXPECT nurses to know BLS and first aid...you should have SOME knowledge on how to respond to a emergency, especially if you need to do CPR-at least compressions on a pt who has a pacemaker. :blink:

*** Sure but anyone who takes a simple half day class can be just as qualified to do CPR. Nurses are not taught to deal with emergencies in school.

We run our nurses residents through dozens of Sim Lab emergency situations and they all have to be taught what to do.

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676 Profile Views; 1 Post

This is why,in part,I will take early retirement. Just from social security. I am tired of it all!

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

75,270 Profile Views; 8,427 Posts

*** Sure but anyone who takes a simple half day class can be just as qualified to do CPR. Nurses are not taught to deal with emergencies in school. We run our nurses residents through dozens of Sim Lab emergency situations and they all have to be taught what to do.

But that's my point...nurses are able; and they are taught....it's not just in the hospital.

We still have to treat and manage emergencies; there seems to be a myth that nurses in LTC, home care, or any other setting-it's ONLY acute care that are the experts-don't know how to handle emergencies; and that's not the case. :no:

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PMFB-RN has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in burn ICU, SICU, ER, Traum Rapid Response.

68,994 Profile Views; 5,143 Posts

But that's my point...nurses are able; and they are taught....it's not just in the hospital.

We still have to treat and manage emergencies; there seems to be a myth that nurses in LTC, home care, or any other setting-it's ONLY acute care that are the experts-don't know how to handle emergencies; and that's not the case. :no:

*** Our residency program is unusual. Most nurses, hospital or no, are not taught to deal with emergencies. Certainly not in school. Other than CPR what other emergencies are your nurses trained to deal with?

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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*** Our residency program is unusual. Most nurses' date=' hospital or no, are not taught to deal with emergencies. Certainly not in school. Other than CPR what other emergencies are your nurses trained to deal with?[/quote']

At my previous employment, I helped create plans on how to deal with seizures, because we has a high population of patients with seizures

disorders, as well as diabetic instabilities (especially hypoglycemia) and first aid; we were required to have BLS.

At my current employer, in LTC, we are trained in first aid, BLS, disaster response, as well as clinical death; we can determine "cessation of life" under our license in my state.

Most hospitals in my area have sim labs and in Critical Care, nurses are trained in emergencies; it is expected have the opportunity to move up and become a resource nurse, which includes rapid response duties.

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1,393 Profile Views; 9 Posts

Did you really need to bash a certain group of nurses? As nurse we should be uplifting each other.

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RNInterupted has 20 years experience and specializes in Critical care, Trauma, CV-Surgery, Emerg.

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Yikes! Did anyone else reading this post get the authors intent?

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

75,270 Profile Views; 8,427 Posts

Yikes! Did anyone else reading this post get the authors intent?

I'm sure we did...no forgiveness for a financial issues; plenty of chances for failure to rescue...

I'm more baffled if failure to pay taxes is severe, that there can't be financial counseling, like there are corrective action plans for failure to rescue...I'm really curious about that.

Edited by LadyFree28

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