Jump to content

nurse shortage

Posted
Rn_mady Rn_mady (New) New

:rotfl: Reports state there are approximately half a million nurses currently employed in other fields, and that by the year 2010, the USA will need approxmately one million new nurses to fill vaciences. Considering the current nursing shortage, in what manner can we encourage some of those 1/2 million trained nurses to return to the field?

Improving working conditions should do it!

Bring back the "Baylor Plan" letting staff work wkends only - 12 hr. shifts, the rest wk. mon.-fri. There need to be more incentives to RNs after so many yrs. (20-25?) like - no more call, weekends, holidays, etc. They tell us here that we don't have enough staff to institute any of these, so all of us who have been loyal employees are burnt out & certainly not telling our children this is a good field to go into thereby making the nursing shortage worse. I like what I do, but after 25 yrs. I'd like to be taken off the call list for sure.

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience.

full time jobs, part time scheduled jobs, fewer casual only hires...

All of the above, but I don't know that anything will be enough to get them all back. It's time to be honest and admit that a good number of those nurses may be unable or unwilling to come back to nursing no matter what changes are made. We're going to have to look at retention as well as recruitment.

Maybe they would come back if they were actually allowed to have "real days off." This means they would not be constantly harrassed on their days off to come in to work. This also means they would not be expected to attend "mandatory meetings" every week. :angryfire

All of the above, but I don't know that anything will be enough to get them all back. It's time to be honest and admit that a good number of those nurses may be unable or unwilling to come back to nursing no matter what changes are made. We're going to have to look at retention as well as recruitment.

The fact is: a lot of RNs already have returned to work.

The half a million number is somewhat out of date. That survey was conducted in 2000.

This study concluded that the recession, as well as better pay, prompted 140,000 RN's to return to work in 2001-2003.

http://content.healthaffairs.org/cgi/reprint/hlthaff.w4.526v1

And even though 60,000 foreign nurses also joined the work force during that period, bringing the total to 200,000 additional RNs, there's still a shortage.

While retention is important, the shortage is more complicated than that. 70 percent of non-working nurses are over age 50 and many may be retiring. In the 2000 survey retirements jumped by 150,000.

Meanwhile, 125,000 qualified applicants were turned away from nursing schools last year, limiting the number of new RNs. In the meantime, aging baby boomers are dramatically increasing the demand for nursing positions.

Consequently, the shortage is likely to be around awhile, and may not be solved just by bringing more RNs back into the work force.

:coollook:

Bring back the "Baylor Plan" letting staff work wkends only - 12 hr. shifts, the rest wk. mon.-fri. There need to be more incentives to RNs after so many yrs. (20-25?) like - no more call, weekends, holidays, etc. They tell us here that we don't have enough staff to institute any of these, so all of us who have been loyal employees are burnt out & certainly not telling our children this is a good field to go into thereby making the nursing shortage worse. I like what I do, but after 25 yrs. I'd like to be taken off the call list for sure.

Amen. This would help with retention. Seniority should have some perks. Who wants to look forward to working weekends forever.

If the Baylor Plan was attractive enough with salary and benefits, there shouldn't be a problem filling it.

Too many perks for seniority and the newer people leave... It's a balancing act for sure!

What nursing shortage.........That all depends in your location.......If you read statistics, many states actually will have a nurse excess in 2010, like kansas, dakotas and many middle states.........

What nursing shortage.........That all depends in your location.......If you read statistics, many states actually will have a nurse excess in 2010, like kansas, dakotas and many middle states.........

Just wondering what statistics you're talking about. The U.S. Health department does say there's not much of a shortage in those states now, but they are projecting shortages in many of middle states by 2010.

:confused:

goverment should realize that the retrogression of visa for nurses will only worsen the nursing shortage.

Maybe there is just a shortage of nurses for full-time, nights and weekends . these appear to be the only jobs open

Dixielee, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 38 years experience.

I worked Baylor during the 80's when my kids were small. We worked 24 hours and nights were paid 40 hours while days were paid 36. You accrued benefits for the hours you actually worked. It was great! I did it for 10 years at a large teaching hospital in ICU. We had 10 different ICU's and the most experienced staff was on week ends. There was virtually no turnover and no problems with call ins. I thought it was perfect and did it about 10 years. It gave me time to be room mother, cookie chairman etc. We could work Friday 7p-7a, Sat or Sun either shift and were able to swap with other Baylor shifters to get time off if your child had ballgames or other events. You could even fit in time for church if you wanted. The Mon-Fri staff loved it and so did we. When they bagan to phase it out, the nursing shortage started there. So now they pay travelers instead. Seems like a waste to me.

CHESSIE

Specializes in Med/Surg, OR, Peds, Patient Education. Has 30 years experience.

The Baylor Plan is a start and a good one. However, respect is essential, and often there is little respect shown to nurses, not just by doctors but by hospital administration. It is ludicrous when a nurse does move into management he or she forgets what it is like to work clinically.

We also need respect for one another. Too often nurses will literally "eat their young alive." I have not only read about this but seen it in action. We need to be better mentors to the new RNs who come to the hospital setting from colleges and universities. We need to have better mentoring for the nurse who reenters the profession after taking a hiatus for raising a young family. So often these nurses are virtually "thrown to the wolves." It is no wonder that they leave when they feel that they are in a "no win situation."

Hospitals have to realize that only by valuing and treating their nurses with the degree of respect that they deserve will they retain them in their work force. This does include salary increases. Hospitals often fight with the MNA (Massacusetts Nurses Association) or other group representing nursing for months even years before agreeing, reluctantly, to a new contract.

Furthermore, staffing standards must be set. The MNA Massachusetts Nurses Association is fighting for these standards. Nurses cannot be expected to care for critically ill patients with insufficient staff. It is unsafe for the patient and unsafe for the nurse's license. We live in a litigeous society. Most nurses want to do their best for the patients in their care but too many patients and too little time to do what is necessary is driving many excellent nurses out of the hospital setting and out of the profession.

Sincerely,

Chessie

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.