CCNE Releases New Standards

  1. Let me know what everyone thinks!

    New 2019 Accrediation Standards
    - The program is responsible for ensuring adequate clinical sites.
    - Clinical sites are sufficient, appropriate, and available to achieve the program's outcome.
    - ...clinical sites are reviewed periodically, and resources are modified as needed.
    - A defined process is used to determine the adequacy of clinical sites.
    - Clinical practice experiences are provided for students in all programs, including those with distance education programs.
    (CCNE, 2018)
  2. Visit Dodongo profile page

    About Dodongo

    Joined: Dec '12; Posts: 539; Likes: 1,162

    23 Comments

  3. by   Jules A
    Where are the measurable goals?
  4. by   Dodongo
    Exactly one of my main thoughts. It's like they thought they could "address our complaints" while at the same time leaving the schools enough wiggle room to not actually have to change anything.
  5. by   umbdude
    I understand the skepticism, but this is a huge step forward and the language in the standards unequivocally places the responsibility on the schools in regards to clinical placement. The timeline (Spring, 2019) is also quite aggressive, which possibly shows that CCNE means business.

    If CCNE doesn't enforce complaints, there are ways to hold them accountable. Students and current NPs will need to monitor and speak up.

    I think this will send chills to many pop-up online NP programs that never have the students' best interest in mind. I suspect that some will simply drop off (eg, for-profits) or significantly limit their program offerings. Big schools (eg, UMass) that shamefully make their students find their own preceptors will probably suck it up and finally invest the much-needed resources into their NP programs.

    This is a far more exciting and significant news than that DNP statement from NONPF.
  6. by   elkpark
    I'm wondering whether the Spring 2019 implementation date means that all schools have to come into compliance by then, or just that that's when the CCNE will start using those standards for reaccreditation -- i.e., that schools that aren't up for reaccreditation until 2023 can continue doing things the old way until 2023, and only have to show that they're meeting the new standards when they apply for reaccreditation. That's how that kind of thing usually works, AFAIK. Realistically, the CCNE can't re-evaluate every school they accredit next Spring.
  7. by   djmatte
    Quote from elkpark
    I'm wondering whether the Spring 2019 implementation date means that all schools have to come into compliance by then, or just that that's when the CCNE will start using those standards for reaccreditation -- i.e., that schools that aren't up for reaccreditation until 2023 can continue doing things the old way until 2023, and only have to show that they're meeting the new standards when they apply for reaccreditation. That's how that kind of thing usually works, AFAIK. Realistically, the CCNE can't re-evaluate every school they accredit next Spring.
    It's been my experience that these organizations use the time before mandate to allow schools the option (some were likely prepping on the old system) while the new requirements only becoming mandatory for anyone accrediting after the date specified.
  8. by   umbdude
    "The 2018 Standards will go into effect January 1, 2019. All programs hosting an on-site evaluation after January 1, 2019 will be assessed using the 2018 accreditation standards." Per AACN website.

    In theory, some programs might be able to push back on this requirement as late as 2028. Another thing that complicates this is that there is another accrediting agency, ACEN, which also gives accreditation to programs that do not place students in clinical sites. Students in ACEN-accredited programs are eligible to sit for both AANP and ANCC exams. It's conceivable that those NP programs will seek ACEN accreditation rather than complying to CCNE standards.
    Last edit by umbdude on Aug 22
  9. by   Dranger
    Quote from umbdude
    "The 2018 Standards will go into effect January 1, 2019. All programs hosting an on-site evaluation after January 1, 2019 will be assessed using the 2018 accreditation standards." Per AACN website.

    In theory, some programs might be able to push back on this requirement as late as 2028. Another thing that complicates this is that there is another accrediting agency, ACEN, which also gives accreditation to programs that do not place students in clinical sites. Students in ACEN-accredited programs are eligible to sit for both AANP and ANCC exams. It's conceivable that those NP programs will seek ACEN accreditation rather than complying to CCNE standards.
    My school had ACEN before CCNE. From my anecdotal experience, CCNE accreditation is preferred. I suspect that if CCNE pushes this ACEN will need to bend the knee. If they don't they will unequivocally be seen as a second rate accreditation (similar to universities with only regional accreditation).

    Nonetheless this is huge and it makes me hopeful for things to come.
  10. by   umbdude
    Quote from Dranger
    My school had ACEN before CCNE. From my anecdotal experience, CCNE accreditation is preferred. I suspect that if CCNE pushes this ACEN will need to bend the knee. If they don't they will unequivocally be seen as a second rate accreditation (similar to universities with only regional accreditation).

    Nonetheless this is huge and it makes me hopeful for things to come.
    Thanks. That's good to know and reassuring.
  11. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from Dranger
    My school had ACEN before CCNE. From my anecdotal experience, CCNE accreditation is preferred. I suspect that if CCNE pushes this ACEN will need to bend the knee. If they don't they will unequivocally be seen as a second rate accreditation (similar to universities with only regional accreditation).

    Nonetheless this is huge and it makes me hopeful for things to come.
    Unfortunately for some consumers (i.e., prospective NP students), second rate is good enough. The goal is to be able to sit for the national boards regardless of how you get to that goal. I've seen posts here that confirm this thought process. There are posters here that say that all that matters is for the NP grad to pass the national boards, doesn't matter how it's achieved. That's not going to stop schools who target this market of students to seek the easier ACEN accreditation instead.
  12. by   djmatte
    Quote from juan de la cruz
    Unfortunately for some consumers (i.e., prospective NP students), second rate is good enough. The goal is to be able to sit for the national boards regardless of how you get to that goal. I've seen posts here that confirm this thought process. There are posters here that say that all that matters is for the NP grad to pass the national boards, doesn't matter how it's achieved. That's not going to stop schools who target this market of students to seek the easier ACEN accreditation instead.
    Be careful what you describe as "second rate". Particularly when the "rate" was set well before CCNE is adopting these new standards and they are part in parcel responsible for the predicament the career field is in. There are some ACEN schools that go far and beyond the requirements and please note that places like the always loathed Walden are CCNE accredited (for those who think this is somehow "preferred" or "better").
  13. by   Dodongo
    Quote from djmatte
    Be careful what you describe as "second rate". Particularly when the "rate" was set well before CCNE is adopting these new standards and they are part in parcel responsible for the predicament the career field is in. There are some ACEN schools that go far and beyond the requirements and please note that places like the always loathed Walden are CCNE accredited (for those who think this is somehow "preferred" or "better").
    I think he is saying in light of these new, more stringent standards, the ACEN will be "second rate". We all know up to this point both accrediting bodies had essentially no standards. There were schools that pandered to the lowest common denominator and those that held their matriculant to higher standards. The point he is making is that there are hordes of dummies that only care about passing boards - whether or not they learn anything clinically relevant to practicing medicine. And let's be honest, passing boards is a cinch for anyone prepared at a half way decent program. I'm confident that you could take the top 50% of RNs, put them through a crash course for boards prep, and they could pass. One exam should not be the limiting factor for practicing medicine. The programs should be.
  14. by   juan de la cruz
    Quote from djmatte
    Be careful what you describe as "second rate". Particularly when the "rate" was set well before CCNE is adopting these new standards and they are part in parcel responsible for the predicament the career field is in. There are some ACEN schools that go far and beyond the requirements and please note that places like the always loathed Walden are CCNE accredited (for those who think this is somehow "preferred" or "better").
    Can you name these ACEN accredited programs that go far and beyond the requirements? CCNE for the last 10 years have owned the lion's share of program accreditation for NP Master's programs making them the "de facto" commission in terms of program accreditation for many university-based nursing degrees. I'm not a Walden insider but that is precisely the reason why Walden supporters are waving that CNNE badge of accreditation in the face of those who doubt their academic standards

close