1 year, 2 years, or 3? or 5?

  1. Just a quick recap I am a new grad and enjoy my NP position in a primary care outpatient setting on a day to day basis. The place is run by some not so competent admin types but the docs, PAs, other NPs, staff in the clinic are good to work with and I'm definitely getting good experience the full breadth of my FNP license. Pay isn't great but we're making some steps, got 5% bump will see what comes next.

    I have also been very fortunate to carpool with a co-worker to clinic it saves time and gas. However she is retiring in about 1.5 years and there will no nobody else to carpool with which will stretch my commute to 1 hour each way

    I have heard a lot of different opinions from other NPs in person about how many years you need as a 'new grad' to get that next job as a not-so-new-grad NP. Some say 1, others 2 years, 3 years one even told me 5 years! I know I would like to stay put and gain enough experience to land a better job next time that is closer to home, but 1 to 5 years is a really wide range

    Any advice appreciated, anybody else considered economic impact with their current job situation?
  2. Visit westcoastgirl profile page

    About westcoastgirl

    Joined: Sep '04; Posts: 171; Likes: 49
    Specialty: 10 year(s) of experience

    9 Comments

  3. by   traumaRUs
    I am starting a prn position in addition to my full-time position soon. I have 2.5 years as a nephrology APN and was considered "experienced."
  4. by   emtneel
    I don't think it matters much unless you live in a "tight" state like CO wants 2-3 yrs experience for most jobs, hence why i can't get a job here....
    But if you are willing to move anywhere, there are jobs that will take with little to no experience.
  5. by   JDCitizen
    Quote from emtneel
    I don't think it matters much unless you live in a "tight" state like CO wants 2-3 yrs experience for most jobs, hence why i can't get a job here....
    But if you are willing to move anywhere, there are jobs that will take with little to no experience.
    I agree. I have seen just as many jobs willing to take/train new graduates. I have also seen dozens of specialties that will to take new graduates as long as they had a background in that specialty as an RN...

    I would guess it just leans towards what your local market demands.
  6. by   ANPFNPGNP
    Quote from westcoastgirl
    Just a quick recap I am a new grad and enjoy my NP position in a primary care outpatient setting on a day to day basis. The place is run by some not so competent admin types but the docs, PAs, other NPs, staff in the clinic are good to work with and I'm definitely getting good experience the full breadth of my FNP license. Pay isn't great but we're making some steps, got 5% bump will see what comes next.

    I have also been very fortunate to carpool with a co-worker to clinic it saves time and gas. However she is retiring in about 1.5 years and there will no nobody else to carpool with which will stretch my commute to 1 hour each way

    I have heard a lot of different opinions from other NPs in person about how many years you need as a 'new grad' to get that next job as a not-so-new-grad NP. Some say 1, others 2 years, 3 years one even told me 5 years! I know I would like to stay put and gain enough experience to land a better job next time that is closer to home, but 1 to 5 years is a really wide range

    Any advice appreciated, anybody else considered economic impact with their current job situation?
    It all depends on the job market. I just went to work in the ER and I was told that they only consider NP's who have 2 years of experience in a minor emergency/ER setting (RN experience is NOT considered). However, last week I traveled to another ER in a rural area and was shocked to work with a brand new FNP with NO ER experience. He was getting blown away. It was his 2nd shift and he mentioned that he was happy that he was getting to work with me there. I guess he had been driving the ER doctor crazy with all his questions and I was able to help him out. All I can say is, you definitely need experience (minimum 1 year) before going to work in the ER.

    Something else, I found out I'm making $5 more per hour than the ER RN's! Yep, they're getting $55/hr AND they get overtime. I get $60/hr no matter how many hours I put in...THAT SUCKS!!!
  7. by   Jo Dirt
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    Something else, I found out I'm making $5 more per hour than the ER RN's! Yep, they're getting $55/hr AND they get overtime. I get $60/hr no matter how many hours I put in...THAT SUCKS!!!
    And how! It makes me feel more and more foolish (and resentful) as I toil away on papers (discussing total BS) and jump through hoops. I guess I get to do a couple of more years of it, too. Won't get the pay but maybe I'll have more job flexibility, maybe not.

    Maybe I'll just go move to a remote cabin in Montana and start riding a bicycle.
  8. by   CrazyPremed
    Quote from ANPFNPGNP
    Something else, I found out I'm making $5 more per hour than the ER RN's! Yep, they're getting $55/hr AND they get overtime. I get $60/hr no matter how many hours I put in...THAT SUCKS!!!
    Are they registry? Do they get benefits? If that were a full time position that would put them at over $100000 a year!

    CrazyPremed
  9. by   globalRN
    Most job postings ask for 2-3 yrs.
    Some postings ask for a minimum of 3yrs
    1yr is some experience but not a lot.

    I think one starts to hit one's stride in 2+ yrs.

    Some places look at how long u stayed in a job to see
    if you are likely to stick around.
  10. by   jeepgirl
    what the heck - what job is this that the nurses are making 55 bucks an hour staff? i looked at jobs for travel and most topped out at 40 an hour...
    GEEZ?!?!
  11. by   westcoastgirl
    wow $5 more than the RNs around you. yeah I get that yucky feeling too there's a pretty bad RN who's been here forever that is making more than I am while doing the absolute minimum or less.

    By the way I don't work in ER and have no plans to do so, I would be looking at another outpatient job for my next job.

    I'm not in Colorado but the market is saturated here so I think sitting tight until I get 2-3 years experience would be a better plan.

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