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Nurse performs a nursing action off the clock. What are the repercussions?

Nurses   (3,152 Views | 41 Replies)
by guest1110906 guest1110906 (Member) Nurse Student

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You are reading page 4 of Nurse performs a nursing action off the clock. What are the repercussions?. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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Yes, the agency told you what you wanted to hear. Not unheard of.

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33 Posts; 493 Profile Views

7 hours ago, LPNpaired said:

Okay, YIKES.

Would you guys let someone fall out and die in lieu of giving CPR just because you weren't on the clock, as well.? (Obviously CPR is a protected area, I'm just making a point). 

 

No, she shouldn't be performing nursing duties off the clock. Fine. But I'd hire a hardworking nurse who went out of their way to do a duty off the clock, to one who doesn't even do their duties WHILE on the clock. 

We dont lose all nursing knowledge and skills when we clock out and we dont regain it magically when we come in. She had the skill and saw an opportunity to, as she saw it, help. We all have to CYA, sure, but when did we as nurses become more concerned with that than providing patient care?... OP, are you quite sure she didn't just step on your toes and upset you by making you feel undermined, as though she was implying you couldn't handle it on your own?... Because hey if thats the case and she's 'that' type of nurse then I totally get it. But all I see from your post is that she was a good, albeit laid-back, nurse with good intentions who was putting a patient over legal nuances in an effort to help both you and said patient.

 

From the title I thought you meant you knew a nurse who started an IV and gave fluids to a drunk friend or something. I mean, Jesus...It's bad practice to work off the clock, sure, but again- she was off the clock, not unlicensed! Imo with something minor like that, which was over and done within seconds, and caused no harm to the patient, it would've been more appropriate to casually remind her that if something had happened it could be bad for you both. "So if you could maybe just be more cautious about what you're doing when you're not on, I'd really appreciate it" etc. Going straight to the Super is not cool and is generally frowned upon by most nurses unless there is a serious immediate risk to a patient.  

You're way in left field bye

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33 Posts; 493 Profile Views

9 minutes ago, caliotter3 said:

Yes, the agency told you what you wanted to hear. Not unheard of.

False , you're a pushover and have no backbone. Whenever an employer's money is at stake they react accordingly.  You dont understand how a business works.goodbye and good day

Edited by FutureRnNnc
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Hoosier_RN has 27 years experience as a MSN and specializes in dialysis.

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29 minutes ago, FutureRnNnc said:

The patient did not need suctioning and she should not have been there. Comment disregarded you're unethical bye

I'm not unethical because I disagree with you. You should learn to accept a perspective that different than your own. It will serve you well in the future, and help you to understand why things maybe don't go as they should, or as you believe that they should. "Bye" is a juvenile response, not the professional that you claim to be.

As a manager, I would love to have staff that acts by the book. Unfortunately, we're all human, and that changes peoples perceptions. I have reported things up my chain only to be told its not illegal, let it go.

You say that management handed it up. Most likely, nothing will happen. Because, while I see the liability issue that you mentioned, if the company keeps said nurse from coming over, you or the company may be fired from that client. Company won't lose business over that. It's not ethical or pretty,  but its reality. 

Be blessed, and have a wonderful day

Edited by Hoosier_RN

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Salisburysteak is a ADN, RN and specializes in Long-term Acute Care.

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You have received several plausible answers; however, your responses to those posters come off as immature and unprofessional! 
 

I believe you felt slighted because the nurse might have undermined you. You should have said something immediately after it happened and reminded the nurse she was not on duty. 
 

Before you disregard my response I have been in healthcare for nearly thirty-years. You are going to find a plethora of personalities and how you choose to deal with them is on you. You can become the tattletale nurse or you can be a nurse that communicates well with co-workers. 
 

signed an RN who has been doing this awhile.

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AN Admin Team has 50+ years experience.

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Topic closed.

OP, you have received some good feedback. Take what you want, refuse what you do not want. Insults, however, are unnecessary.

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