Jump to content

Nurse opinions on "Birth Rape"

Ob/Gyn   (29,115 Views | 66 Replies)

EKUGRAD has 42 years experience and specializes in Psychiatric / Forensic Nursing.

1,533 Profile Views; 65 Posts

You are reading page 5 of Nurse opinions on "Birth Rape". If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

Irish_Mist has 100 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Cardicac Neuro Telemetry.

489 Posts; 15,831 Profile Views

I'm not sure I'd describe situations like these as "birth rape" but definitely assault and battery.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saiderap has 25 years experience and specializes in retired from healthcare.

526 Posts; 15,400 Profile Views

There is already a term for when medical professionals override a patient's autonomy and wishes in treating them without adequate justification. That term is 'battery,' not 'rape.'

Technically, this sounds right. Just one problem though, when someone is in labor, they can be irrational and not know what they need. There are some mothers who if they had not had an episiotomy, would have ended up with a dead or severely compromised baby. A midwife or doctor saving the life of a baby and drastically cutting the mothers labor time might get screamed at by the laboring mother and thanked by her later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,199 Posts; 8,045 Profile Views

Rape is usually not about sexual gratification.

You are correct it's about control, but raoe is still not appropriate in this situation. If you have never been raped, you have absolutely no idea.

A woman not having appropriate expectations in childbirth and ending up with an episiotomy when she says oh I don't want one, is not rape. It's not, no matter the semantics people want to use to spin it.

Women all the time come up with these wonderful birth plans they think are supposed to happen exactly the way the want. They don't recognize things can change and they hear how awful medical intervention is. They want to hear accolades from other people about how much of a warrior princess they are. Then things happen not the way they want and they get mad and upset even though I'm sure it's in their best interest and I now I'm hearing the term rape being thrown around. Really?

I'm sure somewhere there is a shady doctor or so taking advantage of a low income, uneducated, women. It's still not rape although it is traumatic. And I don't believe it's common place.

What i I do believe is common is a bunch of self centered women trying to use a term for shock value. And no, if we can charge a murderer in the deaths of two people when a pregnant woman gets murdered, a woman cannot refuse treatment in labor when the baby is now a person. You can't. We charge people all the time with child neglect for not seeking medical care. Same goes here.

I'm off my soapbox now, but it angers me that people would equate this to rape and compare a flipping unwanted episiotomy to it!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

klone has 14 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership.

6 Followers; 13,528 Posts; 118,429 Profile Views

You are correct it's about control, but raoe is still not appropriate in this situation. If you have never been raped, you have absolutely no idea.

A woman not having appropriate expectations in childbirth and ending up with an episiotomy when she says oh I don't want one, is not rape. It's not, no matter the semantics people want to use to spin it.

Women all the time come up with these wonderful birth plans they think are supposed to happen exactly the way the want. They don't recognize things can change and they hear how awful medical intervention is. They want to hear accolades from other people about how much of a warrior princess they are. Then things happen not the way they want and they get mad and upset even though I'm sure it's in their best interest and I now I'm hearing the term rape being thrown around. Really?

I'm sure somewhere there is a shady doctor or so taking advantage of a low income, uneducated, women. It's still not rape although it is traumatic. And I don't believe it's common place.

What i I do believe is common is a bunch of self centered women trying to use a term for shock value. And no, if we can charge a murderer in the deaths of two people when a pregnant woman gets murdered, a woman cannot refuse treatment in labor when the baby is now a person. You can't. We charge people all the time with child neglect for not seeking medical care. Same goes here.

I'm off my soapbox now, but it angers me that people would equate this to rape and compare a flipping unwanted episiotomy to it!!!

Holy cow, there is so much wrong with this post that I'm at a loss where to begin.

First, you have NO IDEA what my personal history is with regards to sexual assault, so don't EVEN go there.

Second, YES, a woman CAN REFUSE TREATMENT IN LABOR. Let me repeat, A WOMAN CAN REFUSE TREATMENT IN LABOR. I'm LIVID that you, as a healthcare professional, think otherwise.

Third, I'm not talking merely about an episiotomy, although giving an episiotomy against a woman's wishes is WRONG. I'm talking about a woman CRYING and saying "NO, PLEASE STOP!" and kicking her legs or trying to squirm off the bed while an OB is forcing his hand inside her vagina.

Is it commonplace? No. Does it happen? It sure as **** does. And it doesn't matter if it happens 10% or 1% or 0.001% of the time, it's WRONG and to the woman experiencing it, it FEELS LIKE RAPE and if that's how she wants to describe that feeling of pain, humiliation, powerlessness and fear, then by G-d, I'm going to let her. It takes NOTHING away from my sexual assault to allow her to use that descriptor.

Edited by klone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1,381 Posts; 10,658 Profile Views

This thread has turned a bit in tense as it's triggered a lot of emotions for some. I'm just going to remind everyone here to treat each other with compassion and to strive for understanding, even when the other's viewpoints don't align with your own.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9 Posts; 1,226 Profile Views

I suspect this is more common than we think....and having a term associated with it can give women more of a voice.

I was a perfectly healthy educated 24 yo delivering a perfectly healthy 6 lb baby girl with my husband and sister at my side. My labor was progressing beautifully and I was the most quiet, compliant patient you could ask for.

Because my OB was apparently in a rush, he manually dialated me, under the guise of "checking my progress", while I cried, "No, please stop" for the entire minute or so. My husband cried beside me. After my daughter was delivered, he didn't want to wait for my placenta to deliver so he pulled it out prematurely causing it to tear and leave sections attached to my uterus. He then said, "you are gonna really hate me for this" and proceeded to manually scrape my uterus for all placenta remains. Those two interventions were by far the most painful aspect of my daughter's birth.

I was traumatized!

i share this to counter some of the misconceptions I am reading. I will say there is something validating about giving this a name.

27 years later, I am now going to process all these feeling again!

With all that said, this experience, along with many others, has left me a heck of an advocate for patients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

507 Posts; 5,306 Profile Views

So the woman was raped? Doing a medical procedure against ones' will is assault and battery, not rape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saiderap has 25 years experience and specializes in retired from healthcare.

526 Posts; 15,400 Profile Views

So the woman was raped? Doing a medical procedure against ones' will is assault and battery, not rape.

What I've been told is that when patients are irrational, then they no longer fall into this category where they have a right to refuse. "You can't reason with someone who is irrational." A patient who is screaming, "No," when her midwife or doctor goes to cut an episiotomy might be thankful when she finds her frightening and exhasting labor is suddenly over with and she and the baby are safe. Of course there are grey areas even with irrational patients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Follower; 1,319 Posts; 12,476 Profile Views

All rapes are assault, but not all assaults are rape. Is a vaginal sling or abortion with severe complications a rape just because it involves the reproductive system? Is any bad outcome on a woman rape?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apple-Core has 1 years experience as a ASN, BSN, RN.

1 Follower; 1,013 Posts; 6,058 Profile Views

I suspect this is more common than we think....and having a term associated with it can give women more of a voice.

I was a perfectly healthy educated 24 yo delivering a perfectly healthy 6 lb baby girl with my husband and sister at my side. My labor was progressing beautifully and I was the most quiet, compliant patient you could ask for.

Because my OB was apparently in a rush, he manually dialated me, under the guise of "checking my progress", while I cried, "No, please stop" for the entire minute or so. My husband cried beside me. After my daughter was delivered, he didn't want to wait for my placenta to deliver so he pulled it out prematurely causing it to tear and leave sections attached to my uterus. He then said, "you are gonna really hate me for this" and proceeded to manually scrape my uterus for all placenta remains. Those two interventions were by far the most painful aspect of my daughter's birth.

I was traumatized!

i share this to counter some of the misconceptions I am reading. I will say there is something validating about giving this a name.

27 years later, I am now going to process all these feeling again!

With all that said, this experience, along with many others, has left me a heck of an advocate for patients.

Very similar to my story. :sorry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 Posts; 62 Profile Views

Yes, this is a real thing. As a CNM and former labor nurse, I can tell you that it goes beyond just "informing" a birthing woman what is going on. You must get informed consent. Think of that in the context of a "traditional" tape scenario...would being "informed" by the rapist make penetration okay? Of course not. The woman must be asked permission and have control over her own body. No one should touch a birthing woman without asking her permission, informing her on the perceived need for the touch or intervention, and the possible risks and benefits. THIS is informed consent, and does not change, simply because a baby is involved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 Posts; 62 Profile Views

It's not about the outcome, but about the lack of consent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.