Negotiating Pay?

  1. Hi there,

    I'm an ER nurse-turned-nurse-educator, and am gearing up for my talk with my students about the nuts and bolts of taking a professional nursing position.

    My question for nurse managers out there:
    Can a new grad use his/her externship experience to negotiate a slightly higher starting wage? Surely this depends on multiple factors, including one's geographic area.

    Thanks for any feedback, folks!
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    About TheNurseocrat

    Joined: Mar '18; Posts: 2; Likes: 1
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    9 Comments

  3. by   klone
    No. Every new grad has experienced an externship. Having completed one does not make a new grad any more experienced or qualified than any other new grad.
  4. by   TheNurseocrat
    Interesting feedback, thank you. This must be regional also? In our area, externships aren't a given across the board and are more competitive to attain. Thank you!
  5. by   klone
    Quote from TheNurseocrat
    Interesting feedback, thank you. This must be regional also? In our area, externships aren't a given across the board and are more competitive to attain. Thank you!
    Oh, externship. I apologize, I was thinking preceptorship (i.e. clinical practicum).

    Even so, I would say no. Most facilities use a formula to determine the appropriate wage to start a nurse at, using their years of equivalent or similar experience. An externship, while a great experience, is not equivalent to experience as a nurse.
  6. by   SummerGarden
    Former successful nurse extern and now an experienced RN and hiring nurse manager here: I would be put off/insulted by a New Grad who thought he/she could negotiate a starting salary upon completion of an externship because nurse externships are a form of orientation and in no way should be thought of as independent licensed nursing work experience. In fact, nurse externs received a lot of compensation by being honored with the training and the designation at a time he/she could have been sitting at home unemployed. Thus, I think he/she should be very open to a job offer at the scale HR states is for New Graduate nurses unless there is room for negotiation within your organization.... There absolutely was no room for negotiation in mine.
  7. by   klone
    Quote from SummerGarden
    I would be put off/insulted by a New Grad who thought he/she could negotiate a starting salary upon completion of an externship
    That's an odd reaction. Why would you be insulted by someone placing value on their skill level and trying to negotiate based on that? I have a high level of respect for any nurse who tries to negotiate their starting pay when I offer them a job. It's a sign of self-respect and assertiveness that I value in nurses. It doesn't necessarily mean that I can or will give it to them, but it certainly doesn't hurt to ask!
  8. by   SummerGarden
    Quote from klone
    That's an odd reaction. Why would you be insulted by someone placing value on their skill level and trying to negotiate based on that? I have a high level of respect for any nurse who tries to negotiate their starting pay when I offer them a job. It's a sign of self-respect and assertiveness that I value in nurses. It doesn't necessarily mean that I can or will give it to them, but it certainly doesn't hurt to ask!

    I would pass on a New Grad that would negotiate a starting salary... I am one employer so it does not matter in the big scheme of things... However, to answer your question... I would not find the actions of a new grad wanting to negotiate a starting salary as lacking humility given he/she is a new grad and I will be putting in a lot of money to train him/her despite an externship. On other hand, there is such a thing as assertiveness in negotiations for experienced nurses and I fully expect to hear from them when I am giving them job offers.
  9. by   Libby1987
    I wouldn't be insulted but it would be off putting.

    Completing an externship (I completed one myself) could give a new grad increased consideration for the position over a new grad that I might dismiss without consideration. It certainly wouldn't give them any salary negotiating leverage and the fact that they thought it would elevate themselves enough to ask would smack of their inflated confidence and naivety of how little their additional experience scratches the surface. At least in my field where nurses with a great deal of experience struggle with the learning curve.
  10. by   llg
    Over 50% of the new grads my hospital hires have either done an externship or some sort of special preceptorship as part of their school work. In many of our units, having the experience of one or the other is the minimal requirement to be hired. So having that experience doesn't set them apart. That's just what a typical new grad brings to the table these days.

    I wouldn't hold it against a new grad who tried to negotiate a little -- but I would expect them to accept it graciously when I told them that we don't negotiate new grad starting pay.
  11. by   K+MgSO4
    I love that this is not even an option in Australia. We are governed by EBAs in both public and private sector hospitals.

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