Jump to content

Nurse Educator Career Path

Posted

I am in an entry-level MSN program, recently passed the NCLEX (woohoo!), and now have nine months left until I graduate.

I have realized that I am drawn toward teaching or possibly some type of coordinating position.  I certainly appreciate and respect the value in having hands-on nursing experience before transitioning into teaching, but I also know that most bedside nursing isn't for me.  To clarify, I am interested in teaching foundational, didactic coursework or topics like leadership or ethics.

Can you share any thoughts on pursuing this career path without 2+ years of floor experience, as is usually recommended/required on faculty job postings?  Do you have any recommendations on other jobs that I might not know about?  Thanks so much!

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

There is virtually NO opportunity for an inexperienced new grad to teach others. 

anewsns

Specializes in Neurosciences, stepdown, acute rehab, LTC. Has 8 years experience.

I don’t think it’s feasible. Usually to allow didactic instruction they’re going to want you to start as a clinical instructor and you’ll definitely need some nursing experience to do that. I really think bedside is important. I’m the same way and have been a bedside nurse for 10 years . I think I’m finally in a position to be able to teach and I wouldn’t have felt good about it at all without all this bedside experience, not to mention precepting (I never truly feel passionate about bedside unless I’m dealing with some particularly fulfilling situations or if I’m precepting !) I feel like few people actually love basic bedside nursing but we almost all have to pay our dues before moving to our dream jobs. Edit : Even though a lot of bedside jobs suck , there are plenty of little comfortable and supportive units out there that you can find to help you get through the bedside hump. 

Edited by anewsns

On 11/1/2020 at 5:34 AM, meanmaryjean said:

There is virtually NO opportunity for an inexperienced new grad to teach others. 

OK, good to know.  Thanks @meanmaryjean

4 minutes ago, anewsns said:

I don’t think it’s feasible. Usually to allow didactic instruction they’re going to want you to start as a clinical instructor and you’ll definitely need some nursing experience to do that. I really think bedside is important. I’m the same way and have been a bedside nurse for 10 years . I think I’m finally in a position to be able to teach and I wouldn’t have felt good about it at all without all this bedside experience. I feel like few people actually love basic bedside nursing but we almost all have to pay our dues before moving to our dream jobs. Edit : Even though a lot of bedside jobs suck , there are plenty of little comfortable and supportive units out there that you can find to help you get through the bedside hump. 

OK, I'm bummed, but I definitely appreciate that context.  Thanks @anewsns

anewsns

Specializes in Neurosciences, stepdown, acute rehab, LTC. Has 8 years experience.

Yea , it’s a bummer ! I get it. After you get through that first year of bedside you’ll definitely like it a little more though! Just think of it as more schooling !

Just now, anewsns said:

Yea , it’s a bummer ! I get it. After you get through that first year of bedside you’ll definitely like it a little more though! Just think of it as more schooling !

🙃 Ah!  More schooling! 😊 

Nurse SMS, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development. Has 10 years experience.

Yeah, most teaching, whether in an acute care setting or in an academic setting, is going to require a minimum of 5 years acute care experience, and for very good reason. You can't teach what you have not ever experienced. Nursing isn't a book knowledge career.