Racist surgeon? - page 3

So I've been working at this hospital for over a year, in a rural part of the South, one that seems to be stuck in the 50s. The environment in this hospital isn't that bad as most of the docs,... Read More

  1. by   hherrn
    Quote from quiltynurse56
    My big question is what is the approximate age of this surgeon and chief of surgery. Yes, there still are people who act this way. Part of it has to do with age. During the time I have been alive, it has gone from ******, negro, colored up to now being African-American. Some people find it hard to adapt. Then you need to factor in where he has lived much of his life. I can still visit the south and hear some of the unacceptable words from people who have lived there their whole lives.
    True, to a point. If your well intentioned grandmother uses the word "negro", out of ignorance, I would say no harm, no foul.

    On the other hand, I am pretty sure Buckwheat does not come after African American in that succession you described.

    I don't think this schmuck is having trouble in adapting to our evolving language.
  2. by   Temeika
    Sad but I believe this kind of behavior (racist) exist in more places than we can imagine. Some are better at hiding it than other. Ill be glad when all races will view all races as equal. I'm an african american female of lighter complexion and on countless occassions, I've been called white girl by blacks in most cases its taken as a tease, but I hate to be referred as a color based on my skin color. Then I sometime answer, "even, if I was considered a white girl, what is so wrong about that". America as well as other countries can be so superficial, as to always looking and judging what they see on outside.
  3. by   Cola89
    I work in a northern state, in a small town ER and some of the baby-boomer and gen-x staff say things like 'darkie' or 'I have an affinity for the confederate flag...'. so stupid and not funny in the least. I think I might work with a bunch of hicks who are proud to be idiots.

    On the flip side, when I worked in a bigger city, there was this mixed race nurse who openly made fun of a dark-skinned cleaning lady... and bullied and mimicked white people in front of me.

    Had an issue with Mexican-American CNA who accused me of being prejudiced because I asked her to do something pertaining to her job. Management never backed me up, she just laughed at her accusation, didn't address her insubordination, and things went on unchanged.

    Stupidity is all around and it does get really annoying to say the least.

    I agree with the others, though--- you can't reason with the unreasonable.
  4. by   Asystole RN
    Quote from carolinapooh
    I grew up in the South after my dad retired from the Navy and "cultural context" in the context of this post implies things that I'm sorry to say I find insulting. Not all of us who claim that region are backwards, racist idiots with no life experience.
    Quote from carolinapooh
    Not everyone who drinks iced tea and speaks with a Southern lilt is a raging racist - and I've met plenty of people who make that assumption the second I open my mouth, which is as disgusting and as prejudiced as the things they're inwardly accusing me of when they don't even know me.
    You do realize that you yourself are negatively stereotyping an entire region, could be said a specific culture, of people due to your own ethnocentric beliefs right? You see the irony?

    I attribute X negative attribute to people Y.
    I know because I belong to people Y.
    It is wrong when people attribute X negative attribute to people Y.
  5. by   sevensonnets
    Thank you Asystole!
  6. by   Asystole RN
    Quote from hherrn
    True, to a point. If your well intentioned grandmother uses the word "negro", out of ignorance, I would say no harm, no foul.

    On the other hand, I am pretty sure Buckwheat does not come after African American in that succession you described.

    I don't think this schmuck is having trouble in adapting to our evolving language.
    I know 4 black Haitians, 2 black Nigerians, and 1 white South African that believe the American use of "African American" is incredibly offensive. Are we describing race, ethnicity, national origin, or culture here?

    Working in a global company where I interface daily with people around the globe and sit within throwing distance of representatives of 15 countries has given me an interesting view of "PC" terms.
  7. by   Asystole RN
    Quote from hherrn
    True, to a point. If your well intentioned grandmother uses the word "negro", out of ignorance, I would say no harm, no foul.

    On the other hand, I am pretty sure Buckwheat does not come after African American in that succession you described.

    I don't think this schmuck is having trouble in adapting to our evolving language.
    Racism is rampant in this country, can't believe organizations that blatantly use racist terms like that exist.
  8. by   NursesRmofun
    That isn't just racist, it is unprofessional since, apparently, he was talking in a more public place using these slurs. You could report him. However, I do believe there could be some backlash.
    Last edit by NursesRmofun on Sep 2, '16 : Reason: Corrections
  9. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from TheCommuter
    Yep...tolerant, anti-racist people usually do not refer to dark-skinned colleagues as 'buckwheat.' The context in which the comments were made seems clear to me.
    I so dislike being tolerated. I want to be loved because I am lovable, not because anyone thinks I am to be put up with.

    Also, there are racists in every race, every group, every part of America.

    OP - maybe you will develop a good relationship with these two doctors over time, and eventually be able to mention how you were surprised and saddened to hear them saying certain things. But tread very lightly, move ever so slowly on this. They have power and you do not. Meantime, take this all to God in prayer- if you are one who believes in God and prayer. Not to push religion on you at all, that's just what I would do.

    My Jewish friends tell me that they were taught by their parents to expect to be disliked, hated, violenced mentally and even physically with regard to Jews and Judaism. They were told to let it roll off and keep in mind the source of the ugliness. Not easy, but that's what they were taught.

    Everyone has feet of clay and room for improvement.
  10. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Asystole RN
    I know 4 black Haitians, 2 black Nigerians, and 1 white South African that believe the American use of "African American" is incredibly offensive. Are we describing race, ethnicity, national origin, or culture here?

    Working in a global company where I interface daily with people around the globe and sit within throwing distance of representatives of 15 countries has given me an interesting view of "PC" terms.
    A most interesting workplace! What are some of the terms, if you don't mind sharing?
  11. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Cola89
    I work in a northern state, in a small town ER and some of the baby-boomer and gen-x staff say things like 'darkie' or 'I have an affinity for the confederate flag...'. so stupid and not funny in the least. I think I might work with a bunch of hicks who are proud to be idiots.

    On the flip side, when I worked in a bigger city, there was this mixed race nurse who openly made fun of a dark-skinned cleaning lady... and bullied and mimicked white people in front of me.

    Had an issue with Mexican-American CNA who accused me of being prejudiced because I asked her to do something pertaining to her job. Management never backed me up, she just laughed at her accusation, didn't address her insubordination, and things went on unchanged.

    Stupidity is all around and it does get really annoying to say the least.

    I agree with the others, though--- you can't reason with the unreasonable.
    Managers often don't address pro blems because they are afraid of retaliation or they know their boss won't back them and fears lawsuits. How did your case end?
  12. by   dortizjr1
    I happen to work in an ED in a community hospital in eastern Pennsylvania. I'm not too far from Philadelphia and not too close. I've had very similar experiences to what OP relates. It's not just a southern thing.
  13. by   dortizjr1
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Also, there are racists in every race, every group, every part of America.
    True

    Quote from Kooky Korky
    My Jewish friends tell me that they were taught by their parents to expect to be disliked, hated, violenced mentally and even physically with regard to Jews and Judaism. They were told to let it roll off and keep in mind the source of the ugliness. Not easy, but that's what they were taught.
    .
    More or less what my parents taught me, though I'm not Jewish.

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