My preceptor is everything they taught us NOT to be... - page 4

I was hired on a med-surge floor, and have been working with a preceptor for several weeks. After questioning some of the things she is "teaching" me, I've been given a "final warning" and am facing... Read More

  1. by   Rose_Queen
    Quote from libbyliberal
    The OP is a critical thinker and the preceptor is just a tasker and a vindictive little witch.
    The OP should not be vilified here or at work just for trying to protect her patients.
    And you know this how? We are only getting one side of the story here, so unless you were there at the time...
  2. by   MunoRN
    Quote from libbyliberal
    The OP is a critical thinker and the preceptor is just a tasker and a vindictive little witch.
    The OP should not be vilified here or at work just for trying to protect her patients.
    I got the opposite impression, did you mean the OP is "just a tasker"?
  3. by   joanna73
    Sometimes, you have to play the game in order to survive the politics. The OP is not going to be an effective advocate for her patients when she's terminated.

    The lesson here is this: be mindful of your approach. It's not what you say, it's how you say it.
  4. by   ~PedsRN~
    I remember when I finally hit the floor fresh out of nursing school, sure that I was going to be able to save the world. The real world is not the NCLEX world in which you have been living for the past few years. It is what it is. Sure, your preceptor sounds like she has some stuff that she needs to work on, but I will tell you 100% that real world nursing is NOTHING like what you have been taught. The sooner you let go of those preconceived notions, the better.
  5. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from Live..&..Learn
    Sorry, I was not trying to be sarcastic in my comment, not at all. I'm brand new to nursing, and really don't know anything. I put my head down and didn't say a word for several weeks until she started hammering me with bad feedback, even then I only asked her a couple of times why she does things the way she does. I'm lacking in nursing experience, but have plenty of life experience, and am not out to be an arrogant b####. I didn't "tattle" on her, I didn't talk to anyone else in that department or the manager about any of this. Seriously, if an orientee asks why you do things a certain way, especially when all of your clinical experience was at a different hospital, than why take offense? I really did not try to come off that way, maybe I did, who knows, and apparently I'm coming off that way here.
    You probably should never ask questions. Just keep your head down and your mouth shut, laugh at her jokes, don't quarrel or second guess. Survive.

    Actually, you are right in all of your assessments. But you failed the interpersonal getting along thing.
    Not really your fault - your preceptor is afraid, took offense, unfortunately has the upper hand. Your manager should have been talking to you from the beginning of any negative feedback from preceptor.

    I am so sorry you got a rotten deal. That, however, seems to be what Nursing has come to in these United States. Better luck on your next job. Perhaps you won't be fired, maybe they will let you resign. Ask for that deal, tell next potential employer you realized it just wasn't "a good fit". God, I hate that expression.
  6. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from joanna73
    Sometimes, you have to play the game in order to survive the politics. The OP is not going to be an effective advocate for her patients when she's terminated.

    The lesson here is this: be mindful of your approach. It's not what you say, it's how you say it.
    Or that you said it at all.
  7. by   Kooky Korky
    Quote from ArtClassRN
    My primary preceptor, a 30-year nurse, was clueless. Almost no clinical skills, no computer skills, no time management skills (other than taking her breaks), zero ability to plan, react, or adjust to situations. No interest in taking initiative. Completely clueless on the use of the EMR system. Not able to use any electronic tools or resources. Not able to and no interest in figuring out multiple IVs or compatibility. No interest in patient progress or planning. Never tried to figure out a thing for herself, always called and blamed the doctor or pharmacist and even refused verbal orders when she got responses (she didn't know how to use Epic to implement the orders). The only thing she ever did was double-check my medications.

    Every time. Even on our last day. That's all she did. "I'm making sure we keep our licenses."

    I pretended to pay rapt attention to everything she said or did, got through preceptorship with glowing reviews and began doing nothing the way she did when I got on my own. (I did have other very good preceptors and some other excellent mentors.)

    I worked on that unit four years, gained excellent experience, and moved on. She is still there giving nurses a really bad name. Every day I hope she retires.
    Why is she allowed to get away with not keeping up with change?
  8. by   breatheeasy86
    Thanks for the providing information on all nurses. It will definitely be helpful for all the nurses in out country especially those who are into government jobs.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Dec 12, '15 : Reason: TOS
  9. by   Sweecy
    I feel horrible that people are talking as if you did something wrong. I've been in your situation. Sadly, I had to quit that job eventually. I was matched with adifferent preceptor, but still couldn't bring myself to trust anyone after her. She badmouthed me so I thought everyone already had a bad opinion of me. You are not wrong for questioning her skills. Yes, things will never be as you were taught in nursing school but you CAN be a competent nurse. Some nurses are just warm bodies who come to work for the patient nurse ratio. The management know them, but they don't care as long as they show up. They can't teach you, they don't know better. They have 12 hours to make so go with the flow be like them. Please just do as she says and count your days until preceptorship is over. Make sure you do things right when she's not with you. So you don't become her duplicate. You like to do things right just like me. I'm a bit OCD and stubborn on top of it. I had a hard time precepting. Nursing will be easier once you are on you own. YES, charting is IMPORTANT. CHART first! remember what I said about management they just want u to be there to chart. They don't care. Chart n chart n smile to your pts. Ask ur tech to do other things for u. Make sure you are liked and keep charting and keep showing up for 12 hours ������. Sorry. Welcome to nursing or quit. Look into ICU or other specialty where u can do things correctly. I'm going into ICU now I hope it's better. I was you a year ago, I quit after 5 months to go to a different hospital where they let me do things my way. I felt confident and now I'm going to be precepted again ������. Go to work and chart away ������
    Last edit by Sweecy on Dec 12, '15
  10. by   ArtClassRN
    Quote from Kooky Korky
    Why is she allowed to get away with not keeping up with change?
    Because the manager on that unit only cares about filling beds.
  11. by   AussieCCRN
    I think that you need to go to your manager, and request an opportunity to work with an alternative preceptor. Some of the concerns you have are definitely valid and it sounds like you and your preceptor are not getting the best out of each other.
    Unlike a lot of the other comments I agree with you in regards to the dressing change. While it is not necessarily a sterile dressing, aseptic technique should be used with a sterile field and a change of gloves and hand hygiene completed between the removal of an old dressing and a new dressing being applied.
    Good Luck it sounds like you're going to be a great nurse and just require a bit of time and learning how to manage ward politics.
  12. by   VANurse2010
    Quote from AussieCCRN
    I think that you need to go to your manager, and request an opportunity to work with an alternative preceptor. Some of the concerns you have are definitely valid and it sounds like you and your preceptor are not getting the best out of each other.
    Unlike a lot of the other comments I agree with you in regards to the dressing change. While it is not necessarily a sterile dressing, aseptic technique should be used with a sterile field and a change of gloves and hand hygiene completed between the removal of an old dressing and a new dressing being applied.
    Good Luck it sounds like you're going to be a great nurse and just require a bit of time and learning how to manage ward politics.
    I don't disagree with what you're saying per se, but the idea that the procedure had to be a true sterile dressing change is a major misinterpretation/error on her part.
  13. by   LM NY
    I was only able to read some of the responses, but I am in the opposite situation. My preceptor is wonderful and takes every opportunity to teach me and still manages to care for her patients. I have had 2-3 patients and have been working mostly independently, but always keeping my preceptor in the loop. However, the new educator on the floor who has over two decades of experience, most of it being in critical care has been on my back about not filling in every line of the assessment on our EMR. We were in the documentation room and she was making comments and I know for a fact every single person was listening. I appreciate every thing she is trying to do for me and the organization, but I am basically her guinea pig for now. We both started orientation on the same day and she is overseeing me and two other new nurses on the other med-surg floors. I may be a new nurse, but I don't want to be talked to like an elementary school teacher telling her student to make sure to cross every "t". I know I can learn a lot from her and she is extremely knowledgeable. I guess I just had a moment where I felt like a little kid in the principal's office being scolded at. God bless all the nurses that have so many patients plus have to precept orientees or nursing students. If I didn't love nursing so much, I can totally see how people leave the profession.

close