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NP schools without an RN license

NP Students   (1,245 Views | 38 Replies)
by Sun1 Sun1 Member Student Pre-Student

Sun1 specializes in N/A.

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Looking for direct entry NP schools (no RN license) that have a good reputation, that actually teach students properly (one is not left to do the bulk of the studying on their own)....and are receptive to student concerns. Any ideas please do share....if you have attended that school, pls do share your experiences about that as well. Also, if this is an online format....can you please share how it compares to a traditional classroom setting.

Many thanks for all your suggestions.

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umbdude has 3 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Psych/Mental Health.

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There are hundreds of them out there. Have you done any research on your own?  Online is most likely not an option for Direct-entry programs due to the clinical rotations during the RN portion of the program.

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verene is a MSN and specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

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Online format and direct-entry do not go together. There may some lectures or didactic content online but there is a LOT of in-person time for skills lab, simulation, and clinicals at both RN and NP level.  Some level of learning will always be independent at the graduate level how much is "too much" learning on your own?

It would help to know what NP specialty you are interested in as not all schools with direct-entry programs offer all NP specialties, or offer direct-entry into all of the specialties they offer.

Additionally are you looking for direct-entry programs in a specific geographic region or anywhere in the country?

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Sun1 specializes in N/A.

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1 hour ago, verene said:

Online format and direct-entry do not go together. There may some lectures or didactic content online but there is a LOT of in-person time for skills lab, simulation, and clinicals at both RN and NP level.  Some level of learning will always be independent at the graduate level how much is "too much" learning on your own?

It would help to know what NP specialty you are interested in as not all schools with direct-entry programs offer all NP specialties, or offer direct-entry into all of the specialties they offer.

Additionally are you looking for direct-entry programs in a specific geographic region or anywhere in the country?

I think...from what I have seen now....that an RN license is needed to take the NP boards.  Am I right?

So, I guess I need to look at part-time BSN programs or some sort of program that will allow me to take the NCLEX exams.  Any suggestions?

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verene is a MSN and specializes in mental health / psychiatic nursing.

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11 hours ago, Sun1 said:

I think...from what I have seen now....that an RN license is needed to take the NP boards.  Am I right?

So, I guess I need to look at part-time BSN programs or some sort of program that will allow me to take the NCLEX exams.  Any suggestions?

Direct-entry programs do require sitting the NCLEX after the first year (usually) either via awarding BSN along the way or providing letter which allows one to sit NCLEX with out degree - in which case RN license is obtained with out award of degree.

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LadyT618 has 15 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Home Health, Primary Care.

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9 minutes ago, Sun1 said:

I think...from what I have seen now....that an RN license is needed to take the NP boards.  Am I right?

So, I guess I need to look at part-time BSN programs or some sort of program that will allow me to take the NCLEX exams.  Any suggestions?

What is it that you do currently? You need to be a registered nurse to enter a nurse practitioner program. You either need to enter an Associate's or Bachelor nursing program that will allow you to sit for the NCLEX-RN. Depending on the program, they may require a few years of experience prior to applying to their program, but there are some that will take you with open arms with zero experience (hence is why direct entry programs exist). 

The shortest and cheapest way to the RN is the Associate's degree but be sure your geographic area is open to hiring ADN nurses and don't only require BSN nurses.

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Sun1 specializes in N/A.

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15 hours ago, LadyT618 said:

What is it that you do currently? You need to be a registered nurse to enter a nurse practitioner program. You either need to enter an Associate's or Bachelor nursing program that will allow you to sit for the NCLEX-RN. Depending on the program, they may require a few years of experience prior to applying to their program, but there are some that will take you with open arms with zero experience (hence is why direct entry programs exist). 

The shortest and cheapest way to the RN is the Associate's degree but be sure your geographic area is open to hiring ADN nurses and don't only require BSN nurses.

Ok...so have not started anything.  Looking to become a NP later on.  I do have a bachelors in a non-nursing field.  Hoping that doing an associates to get an RN license without the need of a BSN.  Will it then be ok to then apply for a NP program without a BSN.  Is that possible please?

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LadyT618 has 15 years experience as a MSN, APRN, NP and specializes in Home Health, Primary Care.

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26 minutes ago, Sun1 said:

Ok...so have not started anything.  Looking to become a NP later on.  I do have a bachelors in a non-nursing field.  Hoping that doing an associates to get an RN license without the need of a BSN.  Will it then be ok to then apply for a NP program without a BSN.  Is that possible please?

Yes, it is possible. I also had a non-nursing BS prior to getting my ADN in nursing. You just have to find a school who has RN-to-MSN NP programs (they do exist). You do not have to get a BSN. The MSN program will have you take those necessary courses prior to getting into the meat of the NP educational curriculum, but having the BSN is NOT needed. Hope this helps 😉

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200 Posts; 2,175 Profile Views

Why don't you become a Physician's Assistant instead?

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97 Posts; 261 Profile Views

the program that i applied to, columbia,  allows you to go directly into their np program without having an rn experience. i think upenn offers this as well and many others (best to search it on the nursing application portal system nursingcas). also, these programs only take applicants who already have a non-nursing bachelors degree. the only thing that i’m not sure about is if they only allow you to have no rn experience if you go through their direct entry rn route that leads to the optional masters/doctorate level np program. it’s pretty pricey though. for columbia, the masters direct entry is 15 months long. you get an msn degree after and then you get to sit and take the nclex. after that, you have an option to go into their doctorate level np programs. 

Edited by Gmilitar

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BostonFNP is a APRN and specializes in Adult Internal Medicine.

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12 hours ago, murseman24 said:

Why don't you become a Physician's Assistant instead?

Why become a PA over an NP?

There are many ways for non-nursing BA/BS degree holders to become NPs.

1. Direct-entry MSN/DNP-NP programs take non-nursing degree holders through an accelerated RN program to the NCLEX and then directly into an RN to NP program (MSN or DNP). 

2. Enroll in an accelerated (or regular) ADN/BSN program and then bridge to a graduate NP program. 

 

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There are ton of direct entry MSN programs out there. All you need to do is a google search, problem (which is like this for all nursing programs) applications to these programs are highly competitive because the class sizes are so small. I am currently applying right now to these programs. I don't have any nursing experience, you don't have to have a BSN/ADN to apply to MSN programs if you look specifically for "direct entry" or "alternate-entry" programs that add an extra year or so for clinicals and to take the NCLEX the summer before you start graduate specific course work. You also don't obtain your BSN after graduating from most of these programs so you can't quit after getting your RN and state that you now have a BSN.

For program options, UCSF has a great program offers all kinds of specialties. Highly competitive. UT-Austin has a great program but their direct to NP option is only for psych. Azusa Pacific also has a great program. These programs are normally 3-4 years. I saw someone mention Columbia, UPenn, those are great ones too. (I think Northeastern has one). 

There are also other direct entry MSN programs (UCLA, UCI, Western, John Hopkins) have you come out as a CNS. Those are usually only 2 year programs.  If you're really set on becoming an NP you can obtain a post-master's certificate after graduation. These are almost at most an extra year of course work so not too different. Problem is most post-masters want you to obtain about a year of full-time RN experience so you would need to take a gap year in between. 

I have not seen any programs that are online for direct-entry. Maybe I missed it but most of them are full-time in person commitments. Hope this helps!

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