No more lifting

Doctors orders, no more lifting

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I have just experienced a pelvic prolapse, require surgery, also suffer from sciatica and have early stage kidney disease. I have been informed by my team of doctors that I will not be released to work if the position requires any lifting over 5 pounds, this will be a lifelong requirement. What position can I do in hospital then if I can’t help people get around??

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

142 Articles; 9,979 Posts

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

Have you considered NICU? Or, if you're open to the idea of leaving hospital nursing, how about telephonic triage nursing, utilization review, or case management? There are lots of nursing jobs that don't require lifting.

So sorry all this has happened to you. Being a nurse is tough enough without having disabilities. Good luck to you, and please keep us posted.

MunoRN, RN

8,058 Posts

Specializes in Critical Care. Has 10 years experience.

One of the things that defines a successful pelvic prolapse surgery is that you are able to return to a normal activity level, so if your doctor isn't sure enough of their abilities then you might consider seeing another doctor. Sciatica also doesn't mean you can never lift anything again, it just means you need to lift correctly, keep in mind that a 5lb lifetime limit means you can never pick up a gallon milk again.

prmenrs, RN

4,565 Posts

Specializes in NICU, Infection Control. Has 42 years experience.
20 hours ago, VivaLasViejas said:

Have you considered NICU? Or, if you're open to the idea of leaving hospital nursing, how about telephonic triage nursing, utilization review, or case management? There are lots of nursing jobs that don't require lifting.

As a NICU nurse for many years, the patients may not weigh a lot, but, the equipment is another story. And, when you lift a baby who has a couple chest tubes, an ET tube, and pacemaker wires so someone can put a clean blanket under him/her, you feel it in your back. Then there's the acrobatics needed helping a mom breastfeed her baby.

Don't know how that would affect your situation. See if you can find a spot that involves a desk?

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

142 Articles; 9,979 Posts

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.
13 minutes ago, prmenrs said:

As a NICU nurse for many years, the patients may not weigh a lot, but, the equipment is another story. And, when you lift a baby who has a couple chest tubes, an ET tube, and pacemaker wires so someone can put a clean blanket under him/her, you feel it in your back. Then there's the acrobatics needed helping a mom breastfeed her baby.

Thank you. I hadn't reckoned on all that. I stand corrected.

amoLucia

7,735 Posts

Specializes in retired LTC.

I don't know ...

I always figured that there REALLLY wasn't ANY position that could ever expect NOT to be called upon to push/pull/move a heavy weight.

I consider the possibility that during a EMERGENCY 'all hands on deck' are supposed to assist as nec for the emergency.

I'm thinking during a fire or other situation that requires evacuating/moving pts from an area of harm. Transferring pts, pushing whchs, dragging pts (on floor), moving beds, etc, big or little pts can come with all kinds of wts.

And then the elevators are 'off limits' so its the stairs for everyone.

I guess that we're talking probability vs possibility in various jobs.

Specializes in NICU, PICU, Peds, Pediatraic Home Care, Infusion. Has 34 years experience.

I do not know what experience or how many years you have been working as a nurse but at this time I do not lift anything heavier then an IV catheter. We have many choices and I encourage you to “shop around” until you find a good fit.