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Night shift or day shift ?

Posted

What would you say is the harder shift? Would it be night or day shift? I just wanted feedback on both and your opinions. I am referring to cna jobs in hospital or nursing home Thanks!

There's pros and cons.

It mainly depends on your preference and/or needs.

NIGHT

PROS

A lot of down time - if you're new, best time to learn the system in your facility.

quiet - mostly your clients are asleep.

the big bosses aren't around

CONS

well, it's night. it's a struggle to be awake.

You don't get enough experience (comm skills, clinical skills) as all the action happens during the day.

The real work starts an hour before your shift ends.

DAY

PROS More action, more experience. You'll be a pro in no time! T

It's fast pace environment. Time's so faster. You start your shift, get lunch.. next time you'll know, you we're punching out the time clock. Y

You get to communicate more with variety of professionals and other people. A good opportunity to expand your network.

CONS

More work.

You have to get your acts together cause there's lot of probing eyes.

Chances are you'll be skipping lunch breaks if it's so busy unless you're trying to lose weight. ;)

There's pros and cons.

It mainly depends on your preference and/or needs.

NIGHT

PROS

A lot of down time - if you're new, best time to learn the system in your facility.

quiet - mostly your clients are asleep.

the big bosses aren't around

CONS

well, it's night. it's a struggle to be awake.

You don't get enough experience (comm skills, clinical skills) as all the action happens during the day.

The real work starts an hour before your shift ends.

DAY

PROS More action, more experience. You'll be a pro in no time! T

It's fast pace environment. Time's so faster. You start your shift, get lunch.. next time you'll know, you we're punching out the time clock. Y

You get to communicate more with variety of professionals and other people. A good opportunity to expand your network.

CONS

More work.

You have to get your acts together cause there's lot of probing eyes.

Chances are you'll be skipping lunch breaks if it's so busy unless you're trying to lose weight. ;)

Thanks so much for your reply. I do tend to stay up late I am sorta a night owl. You gave me a lot to think about, thank you! What do you prefer? What would you advise for a newbie in a hospital as a cna. Can you clarify on what it is by the the eye probing? I sorta understand, but if could clarify thanks!

I know you don't mean literally eye probing either haha

Paws2people

Has 13 years experience.

Night shift. I wouldn't do my job for a penny less. The shift differential makes a world of a difference. Days equals more work for less pay. Nope. Not for me.

Every person is different. I'm sure the day shift wouldn't like nights because we have no staff.

Night shift isn't necessarily the easiest shift, especially in a nursing home. People with dementia can sundown well into the wee hours of night.

Thanks everyone for your advice! Give me a lot to consider.

I found night shift much easier in terms of quieter unit, less patient demands, less doctor demands, and a chance to read the charts and really learn. However, it is hell as far as your personal life and sleep. You have none of either of those things (a personal life or sleep). Doing three twelves in a row is not as bad because you can sleep in between and then have a normal life the rest of the week (more or less).

Thanks Tammy for you advice and experience. I can see why it would be hard to have a normal life thanks!

It depends. Are you a hard worker, or someone who doesn't want all the pressure. Me, personally, I'd pick night. Why, because it's quiet, and even though it's busy, you can work without all the pressure. Plus, NO BOSSES! :). But you will have to sacrifice your personal sleep life. It ain't easy, but I think it's worth it. Now days, that's another story. Yes, you get your sleep, but you are on your feet the moment you clock in the morning shift. Not only you have to do vitals, but you have to do baths, feeding (which in case if you have three or four feeders, it's going to be a nightmare, because you can't feed them all at once), constant blood sugars, charting, so many demands from the secretary, to patients, to nurse, basically ANYONE! Not only that, but constant eyes. You will be watched like a hawk. Trust me, I've worked both shifts before, and I'd prefer the quietness and less attention. But hey, it's your choice in what you want to do. Good luck with being a CNA!

Starletta, CNA

Specializes in CNA. Has 2 years experience.

Curious, as it is generally 1st, 2nd, and 3rd shift. Not just day vs. night. My Certification expired and I have to re-test and was going to ask the same question. :) I haven't yet worked in a Nursing home and was going to ask about all three shifts and what is the difference, as far as type of work, on the three shifts.

I agree with most of the comments except - NO! patients do NOT sleep at night! They go insane. They elope, get sundowners, feel pain more acutely, and are often more violent at night. Night shift is a great way to learn CPR, since many codes happen at night. To Starletta - yes, there is day and night, 0700-1900 and 1900-0700 typically. So you have to be able to stay awake and alert all night, especially if you're sitting. Do not take a night shift in acute care thinking you'll be sitting on the hospital floor chatting with the other nurse aides. Hospitals have admissions, transfers, surgeries, imaging and emergencies at all hours of the night. There are nights I never sit, and nights I do end up relaxing a little.

I only work 12-hour nights now, mostly because day shift is too hard on my body and, like many have commented, the nurse managers are so annoying it's just a relief to spend the night without them. You can focus more on patient care and not HCAHPS crap.

You absolutely must find a way to take care of your body if you work nights - to get sleep, not feed your body and soul on the endless supply of junk food that is always plentiful in nurse lounges, and work out a way to still have daylight hours available. I just make sure I get plenty of sleep on the days I don't work, and then do without on the nights I do. The extra money is for the havoc that night shifts wreak on your life and health.

And as others commented, CNAs make so little money that for me, the night/weekend diff is absolutely essential. I cannot work days, the money isn't enough. All this being said, I wouldn't be able to work at the level of competence that I do if I hadn't started out on the day shift, but I would never go back.

I'm a night nurse through and through. It works well if you have kids.

I agree with most of the comments except - NO! patients do NOT sleep at night! They go insane. They elope, get sundowners, feel pain more acutely, and are often more violent at night. Night shift is a great way to learn CPR, since many codes happen at night. To Starletta - yes, there is day and night, 0700-1900 and 1900-0700 typically. So you have to be able to stay awake and alert all night, especially if you're sitting. Do not take a night shift in acute care thinking you'll be sitting on the hospital floor chatting with the other nurse aides. Hospitals have admissions, transfers, surgeries, imaging and emergencies at all hours of the night. There are nights I never sit, and nights I do end up relaxing a little.

I only work 12-hour nights now, mostly because day shift is too hard on my body and, like many have commented, the nurse managers are so annoying it's just a relief to spend the night without them. You can focus more on patient care and not HCAHPS crap.

You absolutely must find a way to take care of your body if you work nights - to get sleep, not feed your body and soul on the endless supply of junk food that is always plentiful in nurse lounges, and work out a way to still have daylight hours available. I just make sure I get plenty of sleep on the days I don't work, and then do without on the nights I do. The extra money is for the havoc that night shifts wreak on your life and health.

And as others commented, CNAs make so little money that for me, the night/weekend diff is absolutely essential. I cannot work days, the money isn't enough. All this being said, I wouldn't be able to work at the level of competence that I do if I hadn't started out on the day shift, but I would never go back.

Great insight and the things you mentioned I wouldn't have thought of since its new to me. Thanks for sharing all of that info!

I'm a night nurse through and through. It works well if you have kids.

Thanks I don't have kids but good to know for the future.