Neonatal Nursing Degree

  1. Is a neonatal Nurse practitioners
    a career that will get a lot a job offers from? There are many programs offered where I am from and I don't want to do nursing if I can not work in the neonatal field.
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  2. Visit Jay023 profile page

    About Jay023

    Joined: Feb '18; Posts: 6
    Specialty: 1 year(s) of experience

    13 Comments

  3. by   Guy in Babyland
    Quote from Jay023
    I don't want to do nursing if I can not work in the neonatal field.
    The availability of NNP jobs varies by the area and the time you are looking. There are less NNP positions due to the fact that they are almost exclusively in hospitals (NICU) as compared to FNP which work in clinics. You can also be a bedside NICU nurse (ASN/BSN) without going to NP school (Master's degree).

    You need to first go to nursing school and get your ASN or BSN degree. You will need 2 yrs experience working in a NICU before being able to apply for a NNP program.
  4. by   Miiki
    It seems that NNPs generally have jobs. Especially if you are willing to move. That's something to think about and decide on BEFORE pursuing it.

    NANN does biannaul workforce studies and according to them, there is a shortage of NNPs. Which may be because of the perceived lack of jobs. Out of the over 200 NICU nurses that work in my unit, about 30 are in NP programs and 2 (including me! Whoop!) are in NNP.

    The hard part may be getting that first RN job in the NICU, but once again, it's easier if you are willing to move.
  5. by   Jay023
    Thanks will keep that in mind!
  6. by   Jay023
    Yeah, I have been considering family NP also. Thank you for the valuable information!!
  7. by   Leader25
    Not many openings for NICU,it is a small world too.They use PA s more often they are cheaper but with a RN NNP they get more bang for the buck,my place has stated that the NPs do better with families ,while the PAs are better in technology areas like the OR.
  8. by   infantsonly
    Quote from Leader25
    Not many openings for NICU,it is a small world too.They use PA s more often they are cheaper but with a RN NNP they get more bang for the buck,my place has stated that the NPs do better with families ,while the PAs are better in technology areas like the OR.
    I completely disagree. I am graduating this Spring and have had an NNP job signed since last year at a large teaching hospital. There is a shortage of NNPs. I have started seeing some hospitals utilize PAs in NICUs but the majority of neonatal providers I have seen (besides neonatologists) are nurse practitioners. PAs have a broad knowledge base while NNPs have been trained exclusively in the neonatal setting.
  9. by   babyNP.
    Leader, do you work in a NICU? Because if you do, I'm not sure why you would say something like that...there are some places where PAs are specifically excluded because of their lack of training in the NICU. That is why neonatal PA fellowships are popping up, because PAs don't have the training to work there without an extensive orientation, like 6 months to a year...unlike NNPs. I know of a few facilities that even refuse to hire PAs even if they've done a fellowship.

    And as infantsonly said, yes, there is a shortage of NNPs. NANN recently published a workforce survey and the average age was 49 and showed rising vacancy spots with people taking less than full-time positions, retiring, residents covering less time in the NICU due to changes in pediatric residency requirements (used to be 3 months, now only 2, although individual programs can require 3 months), etc etc
  10. by   adventure_rn
    Quote from Jay023
    I don't want to do nursing if I can not work in the neonatal field.
    The greatest potential barrier, IMO, is getting your first NICU job. As Guy said, you need at least two years of NICU RN experience to apply for NNP programs. NICU new grad jobs are notoriously competitive, and you should go into nursing with the understanding that you may not be able to get one immediately as a new grad (which may mean working in mom-baby or even with adults in med-surg for at least a year). There are several posts on this forum about your odds of getting a NICU job as a new grad; your chances are much better if you are flexible and have the ability to relocate as needed.

    Quote from Jay023
    There are many programs offered where I am from
    As others have said, there is an overall national NNP shortage, and therefore you will likely be able to get an NNP job. However, realize that if your region has a bunch of NNP programs, the job market in your specific location may be saturated with NNPs. You'd probably have an easier time getting hired in a city or state that has no NNP programs than one that has a bunch (and therefore a bunch of local new grad NNPs competing for the same job openings). As I stated above for getting your first NICU RN job, your changes for getting hired as a new grad NNP are much better if you are able to relocate as needed.
  11. by   Leader25
    you need to reread my post,sorry but you misunderstood it.
  12. by   Leader25
    Listen please ,that is how IT is where I work,(over 30 years not just one year)the nurses prefer working with NNPs but many were phased out many years ago,even though the DON has said the NNPs do better with families and the PAs are better off in the OR,BUT the Nicu (where I work) keeps hiring PAs,right now only one NNP left and she will be leaving soon.
  13. by   infantsonly
    Taking one or two people for what they say regarding an entire profession is very narrow minded, especially when you only have experience at one hospital. I have experience with many different hospitals and I completely disagree with your assumptions. Good luck to you in your profession..
  14. by   Leader25
    You still prejudge I have more experience than I care to note here ,it is not about not tooting my horn to have you understand something that is so evident.Calling people names because their opinion differs from yours is not what I expect of educated nurses. I wish you much luck in your future.

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