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New nursing student (questions)

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Will be a student as of January 1st, 2012, was wondering the ramifications, daily protocols, what all this talk is of clinicals, and any regular expectations you have, and I should have as a prospective student. Please, don't hold back......bombard me!

Bob_N_VA

Specializes in Cardiac, Rehab. Has 2 years experience.

You're asking for folks to describe the whole experience of nursing school in one question. You may get better responses by being more specific. On a general note, just start reading threads, you'll start to pick up some of what goes on. But there is also quite a bit of drama, probably most of it uneccessary and more than enough really silly questions too. Have fun.

workingharder

Has 2 years experience.

It's a years long stress test.

I am a new nursing student and will start Fundamentals of Nursing in a couple of weeks. Your best bet is to read the posts on this site and to use the search engine at the top to find more specific topics of interest to you. This site has a TON of information (at times it can be information overload :eek:) but it is a GREAT site. I must warn you that you have to have a level of discernment when it comes to reading some of the posts. Just because one person had a negative experience, doesn't mean that you will have the same. So be sure to filter everything, keeping it all in perspective. There is a lot of wisdom within the pages, even in the posts that are seemingly sarcastic. Congratulations!!! See you on the other side.

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

It is pretty much an endurance test. Your real life will have to be shelved for a while. You will have lectures, projects and traditional teaching then go to facilities (nursing home, hospital, clinic) for "clinicals", or practice with a patient. Clinicals start after you get the basics down, like how to check a temperature. You will stress out if you think ahead too much. Remember, they are TEACHING you as opposed to expecting you to know it already. So take one day at a time.

Stcroix, ASN, RN

Specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU. Has 6 years experience.

Ok. here goes, basic rules to start out with:

Don't EVER get behind in your work

Read assigned material before class

Prepare for clinicals (6AM) the night before

Avoid students who don't work very hard

Plan on spending 3 hours studying for every hour in class (some need more, few need less)

If you aren't already, get organized, the stuff comes at you fast and furious and you can get bogged down before you know it!

Get at least one 'success' book for Fundies and use it before each exam. You will get some practice taking the question format

Try to save some time for you and your family! NS is stressful on relationships

Read this forum! It will get you more oriented than anything else I know

That's all for now, good luck!

AgentBeast, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiology and ER Nursing. Has 7 years experience.

Its easy.

True that, when you know what you are doing. It's a hell of a lot of fun too.

1.read/skim the assigned readings and make notes (if that works for you), make sure you have time for each class

2.do not stress TOO MUCH over exams! breathe! if you know you studied, do your best to narrow down (esp on multiple choice exams) your final answer.

3.get into groups to study,practice head to toe assessment etc

4.ask questions in class,got to your instructors office hours.

5. have time for yourself (exercise.whatever makes you happy) and do not forget your family and friends..LOL!

Goodluck!

It is pretty much an endurance test. Your real life will have to be shelved for a while. You will have lectures, projects and traditional teaching then go to facilities (nursing home, hospital, clinic) for "clinicals", or practice with a patient. Clinicals start after you get the basics down, like how to check a temperature. You will stress out if you think ahead too much. Remember, they are TEACHING you as opposed to expecting you to know it already. So take one day at a time.

so...you seriously just study science and practice what you know as you learn it, and expand your knowledge base by exploiting ignorant patients? Cute. I like it.

Ok. here goes, basic rules to start out with:

Don't EVER get behind in your work

Read assigned material before class

Prepare for clinicals (6AM) the night before

Avoid students who don't work very hard

Plan on spending 3 hours studying for every hour in class (some need more, few need less)

If you aren't already, get organized, the stuff comes at you fast and furious and you can get bogged down before you know it!

Get at least one 'success' book for Fundies and use it before each exam. You will get some practice taking the question format

Try to save some time for you and your family! NS is stressful on relationships

Read this forum! It will get you more oriented than anything else I know

That's all for now, good luck!

I'm going for my LPN. So, you're saying, they do 'clinicals' and based on another user here, after you're experienced enough to do basics like 'blood pressure' 'breathing' etc. then you do them until your class time expires?

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

I thrived in clinicals, best advice I would give any new student or current student, or anyone period. Stay positive, keep away from negative people, don't lose your enthusiasm. I just graduated days ago and overall I had a great experience. Nursing school wasn't a walk in the park and my school has a really good program. They had a 100% NCLEX pass rate the previous semester and the year before that. They really got tough with their program to get National Accreditation. That said, it hasn't come close to being the hardest thing I have ever done in my life.

Stcroix, ASN, RN

Specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU. Has 6 years experience.

I'm going for my LPN. So, you're saying, they do 'clinicals' and based on another user here, after you're experienced enough to do basics like 'blood pressure' 'breathing' etc. then you do them until your class time expires?

You have classes for theory and book learning, and you have lab classes to teach you to use techniques such as: blood pressure, temp, heart rate, and other types of assessment of your patient. These lab classes will go on throughout the semester. In addition, after a few first weeks of lab you will do clinical duty in a hospital, nursing home, etc, and work with patients under the supervision of a clinical instructor.

fromtheseaRN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Emergency/Trauma.

so...you seriously just study science and practice what you know as you learn it, and expand your knowledge base by exploiting ignorant patients? Cute. I like it.

you study the material you are taught in class, which will consist of nursing theory, pathophysiology of disease processes, how to recognize progression of disease processes, and the appropriate interventions. tests in nursing are not like tests you are used to- it is not answering questions with facts that you have memorized, it is application. for example: you walk into a patients room and their vitals are x, y ,z, and they are displaying symptoms x, y, and z. what do you do? you need to use the information given to you to determine what is going on with your patient, and to then determine how you need to act in that situation.

also, you are not exploiting ignorant patients. you are providing real nursing care for patients who need it, under the direct supervision of your clinical instructor.

MissHaleyDawn

Specializes in Nephrology, Oncology. Has 4 years experience.

Be prepared to have no social life, to have textbooks as BFFs, and make life-time friendships with your classmates. I couldn't have made it without my nursing buddies!

Clinicals...oh, clinicals. It's kind of hard to sum them up. Everything's totally unexpected. My first day a man coded and I was having at it with chest compressions. :eek:

~Mi Vida Loca~RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Emergency Dept. Trauma. Pediatrics. Has 6 years experience.

Be prepared to have no social life, to have textbooks as BFFs, and make life-time friendships with your classmates. I couldn't have made it without my nursing buddies!

Clinicals...oh, clinicals. It's kind of hard to sum them up. Everything's totally unexpected. My first day a man coded and I was having at it with chest compressions. :eek:

I would actually go against having no Social Life, it's important to take time out for yourself and also spend some time with your family and friends.