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Stcroix ASN, RN

cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU
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Stcroix has 6 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in cardiac-telemetry, hospice, ICU.

Stcroix's Latest Activity

  1. Stcroix

    Nurse Sick and FIRED: Exploring Nursing Absenteeism

    I was a seasonal nurse. had the flu once, called off for what turned out to be hospital acquired pneumonia. was admitted to my own hospital, visited by my manager and many co-employees. when i returned 4 weeks later after acute kidney injury a c-diff, my manager said i violated my seasonal contract and could leave or work at beginners pay, thank you very much. said hospital lists retention as their biggest problem.
  2. Stcroix

    What's the BEST nursing shoes?

    I replied to this topic years ago. I tried at least 10 different types of shoes. In the last two years of my career i found Hoka 5, a running shoe. Lightweight, well padded, and protect my arthritic feet. Like it has been said, no one shoe works for everyone, but I am a happy camper. oh yeah, they last a year on the floor.
  3. I worked a while for Hospice.. We used sub Q to administer morphine on a continuous drip. The rate need to be very low (in volume). Sub Q injections by their very nature go into spaces that don't exist, they 'make their own space'. I have never seen a sub Q site flushed, heparin or otherwise, it would do damage to the skin. In fact, SubQ sites go 'bad' quite quickly, often the site is changed daily. We used a tiny TB type needle mounted on a plastic base that adhered to the skin by a peel off sticky base. Maybe the OP was seeing a type of true IV, and of course flushing would be done. As a hospice nurse I never used a peripheral IV. I would on rare occasion access a port or Picc if the patient came with it.
  4. Stcroix

    Traveler to Avow Naples FL

    So glad it worked out. yes, they are nice folks
  5. Stcroix

    4 weeks?!

    Many good points made here. The one I haven't heard much about is the patients. I know that at 4 weeks in if I had been cut loose on my own my patients would have gotten to short end of the stick. I don't think they were in jeopardy because I would ask if I didn't know, but because of being in the 'deep end' so early (especially on a tele floor) I would have very little time to spend with them. At four weeks I was so inefficient that common tasks took me twice as long as they should. Heck, I barely understood where things were on the unit. No, four weeks is not adequate at all. Only you, OP, can decide if you should go for it.
  6. Stcroix

    Generation Gap??

    I remember being the cool kid on the playground because I had a transistor radio. (I bet a lot of you don't know what that was). Also I bought my first computer for my business in 1983. It replaced a legal sized ledger that we actually wrote words and numbers on! Said computer ran DOS, had 40 MEGAbytes of hard drive and cost me $4,000. I thought it was a miracle. Oh, and by the way, we still had to deal with those pesky dinosaurs running around the neighborhood, one ate my little brother ;-).
  7. Stcroix

    Being Ordered to Give Whiskey

    I agree. Like many of us, I have had more alcoholics than I care to remember. Currently, the approach in favor is to detox ALL of them using benzos and (hopefully) prevent seizures. There is also a prevailing sense of urgency among the nurses and the doctors to discharge them ASAP before the magic 3rd day where severe withdrawal tends to occur. I for one just don't get it. We know the vast majority of these folks aren't going to quit drinking, so why even try? It makes much more sense to me to keep withdrawal at bay with the poison they came in with, address their other medical problems and discharge them back to their lives without try to be virtuous and detox them. Unless of course the patient expresses the wish to attempt detoxing.
  8. Stcroix

    Traveler to Avow Naples FL

    Good people, even better community of nurses. I worked in the home care end. I felt comfortable and welcome. They look for you to do 4 visits a day, occasionally a fifth on crazy times. You are well supported. Docs are great, available, down to earth and willing to support the nurses. Good luck!
  9. Stcroix

    Least Favorite Things Patients Say

    "I need to see the doctor now!" What's wrong, I ask. "I don't feel good". What's wrong I ask again. "I don't know, I just don't feel good". I check vital signs, all good. Can you be more specific? "No, I just don't feel good" - and then goes back to munching on a sandwich and texting.
  10. Stcroix

    Nurses Attacked by Patient

    Near misses happen way too often that could go on to incidents like this one. Hospitals have become the new mental health institutions. When cops find an incoherent coo-coo what do they do with them? Yup. Just this week we had one who went bonkers and physically tore his room apart (like ripped a bedside table apart with his hands). Thankfully, the sitter had bailed and we all (with security) watched from a safe distance while he finished. What the he**? Talk about not being safe, we nurses are not prepared to deal with people like this, and our facilities were never intended to deal with them. I don't have a solution, merely an observer- and potential victim.
  11. Stcroix

    Do you get hit/spit on? Does body fluids splash on you?

    I've had many experiences being struck. The worst bodily fluid incident I had was when a clogged rectal tube 'blew out' while i had the patient rolled on his side so i could investigate. As the writer above, I got coworkers to get me some OR scrubs and I hosed myself off. I am thankful it didn't hit my face, but otherwise I was baptized in liquid poo. I learned to stay out of the 'line of fire'.
  12. Stcroix

    Don't become an injury statistic...

    Yes, I have lost a few days from back strain, and never had a history of it before becoming a nurse. Also, there have been 3 assaults on nurses on my floor alone during the last year. One nurse was injured and has been out of work for a month now. Our manager brought in a consultant to review best practices to help prevent more injuries. All assaults were conducted by etoh/ drug withdrawal patients.
  13. Stcroix

    Nurses and their pens

    Uniball, black, extra fine. And you can borrow it when you pry it from my cold dead hands. Don't ask.
  14. Stcroix

    August 2015 Caption Contest. Win $100!

    Meet Harold, he's our new transporter. He doesn't use stretchers, just carries the pt under his arm.
  15. Stcroix

    Reasons patients turn on their call light

    Excuse me for not being clear. She had a PCA pump, knew how to use it, but did not want to push the button for pain relief. I instructed her that she had the cure for her pain in her hand, but she "didn't want to use it". I guess she just wanted to let me know she hurt- go figure.
  16. Stcroix

    Cardiovascular certification

    The exam is very difficult. I took an in-class course over two days, followed by the exam. It was an intense course followed by an even more intense exam. Obviously, the course was tailored to us passing the exam. I wouldn't have wanted to study that info from a book before the exam, it was a lot to learn, but I am sure many do. Good luck.
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