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New Graduate looking for a job!

Posted

Hi everyone :-)

I am a new graduate, passed the CRNE :-) but I'm finding it difficult to find a job. I live in Ontario and have applied numerous places but am getting no call backs? A lot of my classmates seem to have found jobs already, how are the other new graduates finding the job hunt? Another question i have is when I do apply for jobs it asks whether "you are registered with the college of nurses of Ontario" I have not sent in my application yet because I'm waiting for my police check however I did pass the CRNE should I say no? because technically i am not yet registered but I feel that if i say no then they may not even take a look at my application for the registered nurse position (Sorry if i am babbling :p). Anyways I would appreciate any responses :-) Thank you!

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Hi, there. Your post has been moved to the Nursing in Canada forum with the goal of attracting responses from nurses who live and work where you live. Good luck to you!

Starlane, you wrote a post that could pass off as my own story. I'm in the same boat as you. I just sent in my application this week and I had the same thought about whether or not to indicate "Registered with the CNO".

At this moment, I am taking a second look at my resume and considering changing the format of my resume when sending them online. Some employers/HR may use a tracking database where they scan your resume and see if you have "key" terms they are looking for in your resume. PDF files might be the hardest to scan. From online sources, they say Word doc vs. docx is more universal to use. If it a copy and paste site, they prefer it to be copied from a .txt document (aka no special formatting)

My friends have encouraged me to take a hard copy of my resume and walk in to speak to managers but I do not feel comfortable doing that at the moment, as I see the managers being busy and it's a hospital unit...but they have told me this has worked for some folks. I would feel more comfortable if it was a manager that a friend works for and could say they don't mind meeting in person.

loriangel14, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

If you have passed the CRNE I would say you are registered.

I was leaning more towards saying Registered with the College; because if you are in the process of registering (about to send in forms/sent forms, waiting for it to be processed), by the time an employer may call you for an interview, there is a chance you will already be registered with the College. You do not want to miss an opportunity when applying over a small detail. Most organizations may ask for proof of being in the process of registering if you are not currently registered, which is passing the CRNE as a step.

NotReady4PrimeTime, RN

Specializes in NICU, PICU, PCVICU and peds oncology. Has 25 years experience.

Passing the CRNE doesn't automatically confer registration. The paperwork still has to be filed and the fee paid.

joanna73, BSN, RN

Specializes in geriatrics.

Not only that, but depending on how you answered questions on your registration application, the College may decide to review your documents and hold registration until they are satisfied.

Tell them you've passed the CRNE and registration is pending in your cover letter, but don't indicate you're registered until it's official.

The letter we received that informed us we passed the CRNE mentioned we are not officially allowed to use the title of RN until the application and fees are processed.

You will know you are finally registered from receiving an email the College sends, and also by searching for your name on Find A Nurse if you're with CNO. Later on, we will be sent official papers also indicating we are registered (I.e. Given a registration #/ID).

So I would do what the previous posts mentioned, if possible, tell the employer you are eligible to become registered and in the process of doing so. When it comes to a drop-down menu on an online application with only yes or no to the question "are you registered with the College?", I do wish they had an option of "eligible of registration" to be considered.

Starlane, you wrote a post that could pass off as my own story. I'm in the same boat as you. I just sent in my application this week and I had the same thought about whether or not to indicate "Registered with the CNO".

At this moment, I am taking a second look at my resume and considering changing the format of my resume when sending them online. Some employers/HR may use a tracking database where they scan your resume and see if you have "key" terms they are looking for in your resume. PDF files might be the hardest to scan. From online sources, they say Word doc vs. docx is more universal to use. If it a copy and paste site, they prefer it to be copied from a .txt document (aka no special formatting)

My friends have encouraged me to take a hard copy of my resume and walk in to speak to managers but I do not feel comfortable doing that at the moment, as I see the managers being busy and it's a hospital unit...but they have told me this has worked for some folks. I would feel more comfortable if it was a manager that a friend works for and could say they don't mind meeting in person.

Hi, thanks for the reply! yeh that is what I'm worried about I feel that there is a basic questionnaire that only gives you a few options as a response and if that response is not favourable the system will put your application to the side-but I'm not really sure 100% how it works

NextGenRPN

Has 1 years experience.

finding it difficult to find a job? are you only applying to particular places that you want, or are you applying to everywhere just so you can get your foot in the door and experience? . it was the same situation with my graduating class, people would always complain about not being able to get a job when they have only been applying to a select few places their "dream job" so to speak. the harsh truth is unless you had something lined up while finishing prgrad then your going to have to not be picky and work at anywhere that will hire you. as for the aplication on my resume when i passed the cpnre i put " successfully completed CPNRE awaiting registration from the CNO" in your cover letter mention you are waiting for your registration, it took 3 weeks for me do all my orientation and paper work before i could start and my registration came just in time. get some people to look at your resume, design it more towards a nursing job, managers arnt going to care that you sold fries at a chip truck during the summer. highlight clinical experiences ect if you didn't work as a psw during school or something like that, a little trick i use when emailing resemes is i email them them during closing hours late at night so when hr comes in the morning hopefully my email was thy last they had. when applying in person always ask to speak to managers directly or get their ext numbers so you can follow up in a few days. i hope you can take something from this post and good luck on the job hunt!....apply to a staffing agency , horrible job for new grads, but if you can handle it then it will be great for resume experience and will leave no time gaps, while you search for your dream job, when i graduated i worked for a staffing agency for 6 months then landed a job at a hospital in a forensic mental health setting! you get what you put in so work your but off and it will pay off!

Hi there, so far i have applied to numerous hospitals/various positions. The only areas where I have not applied are homecare/long term care, but otherwise I feel that I am being flexible. I have applied to probably 6-7 hospitals, which is pretty much the limit otherwise i would have to travel an extremely long time and pretty much to every position posted on the hospital websites. My resume is mostly focused on nursing, just with one point listing my "selling fries" type of job :p but i have worked there for 7 years so i also feel that that is important ? (maybe not)...Thank you for the response, your tip about emailing during closing hours is a good one! :) sorry if this is a dumb question, but what do you mean by staffing agency, is it home care?

If you are limiting yourself to 6-7 hospitals you have to be really lucky to get in. It is pretty hard for new graduates to land a hospital job unless they did preceptorship there. Try to get in touch with your preceptor and apply for positions there. Other thing you can do is to personally go to those hospitals or try to get email of nursing managers and send your resumes directly to them. If that doesn't work I guess your only option is to apply for homecare/long term care. I have got one casual in each of those to get some experience till I land something in hospital. I prefer homecare over LTC since I don't have to care for 80 clients at a time. Your choice - Do you want to keep applying to same hospitals for 6 months in the hope of a response or use that time to take up some experience.

Edited by UNB_RN

loriangel14, RN

Specializes in Acute Care, Rehab, Palliative.

Hi there, so far i have applied to numerous hospitals/various positions. The only areas where I have not applied are homecare/long term care, but otherwise I feel that I am being flexible. I have applied to probably 6-7 hospitals, which is pretty much the limit otherwise i would have to travel an extremely long time and pretty much to every position posted on the hospital websites. My resume is mostly focused on nursing, just with one point listing my "selling fries" type of job :p but i have worked there for 7 years so i also feel that that is important ? (maybe not)...Thank you for the response, your tip about emailing during closing hours is a good one! :) sorry if this is a dumb question, but what do you mean by staffing agency, is it home care?

Not applying to LTC and homecare is cutting out a huge part of the market. if you really want to work you need to be willing to try everywhere.

joanna73, BSN, RN

Specializes in geriatrics.

Hospital jobs are dwindling each year. The focus has shifted to community based care. As a new grad, you cannot afford to overlook any position. Zero experience while holding out for that ideal job is not going to advance your skills. Apply for everything.

xokw, BSN, RN

Specializes in Public Health. Has 5 years experience.

Hospital jobs are dwindling each year. The focus has shifted to community based care. As a new grad, you cannot afford to overlook any position. Zero experience while holding out for that ideal job is not going to advance your skills. Apply for everything.

Exactly what I am constantly telling new grads who then roll their eyes and brush me off as if I have no idea what I am talking about! I guess I am still a new grad myself but I took whatever job I had to take to get some experience and get my resume noticed.

For those who are set on a particular area or setting, we are not asking that you give that up. We are merely suggesting that you get some valuable experience in another area while you chase that dream! Work in long-term care, retirement homes, community nursing, anywhere! ANY nursing experience is better than ZERO nursing experience on your resume!

End rant :)

vintage_RN, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience.

Gotta agree with the others. I was super lucky and got a hospital job right away, but no experience is way worse than some and you are limiting yourself to a whole other world of possibilities by overlooking ltc and homecare...also clinics/doctors offices. I got my job by emailing managers and personally going into their offices on the units to give them my resume. You have to do anything and everything. I graduated in December and some of my classmates only applied to hospital jobs because they turned their noses up at ltc..let's just say that's it's almost September and they still don't have jobs. The longer they go without jobs the harder it will be. Good luck

joanna73, BSN, RN

Specializes in geriatrics.

Then you become an old "new grad". Every semester, fresh grads are competing in the market. So now, the competition has increased and your skills are non-existent. Clinicals don't count when you've sat idle for months.

NextGenRPN

Has 1 years experience.

Hi there, so far i have applied to numerous hospitals/various positions. The only areas where I have not applied are homecare/long term care, but otherwise I feel that I am being flexible. I have applied to probably 6-7 hospitals, which is pretty much the limit otherwise i would have to travel an extremely long time and pretty much to every position posted on the hospital websites. My resume is mostly focused on nursing, just with one point listing my "selling fries" type of job :p but i have worked there for 7 years so i also feel that that is important ? (maybe not)...Thank you for the response, your tip about emailing during closing hours is a good one! :) sorry if this is a dumb question, but what do you mean by staffing agency, is it home care?

When you work for a staffing agency what happens is x nursing home has someone call in sick, they then call your agency, agency then calls you and then you go to x nursing home to work the shift. i would work 4-5 different homes a week, horrible for a new grad as there is a lack of support on the employers part (in my case at least) dont limmit yourself though take any experience is better than none, i did that job for 7 months right out of school just so i could have some experience under my belt and it has paid off as i am working in a hospital in pretty much my dream job, but that seems to be very rare these day i was extremely lucky :). and yes your fry selling job should go on there but with like 1 or 2 bullets, fatten up that resume with nursing jargon and you should be good. also in your young take an adventure and apply to other cities, i had to pack up leave home and live 4 hours away just so i can have my dream job, you gotta do you. feel free to PM me if you would like some resume help, i helped my buddies girlfriend and she landed a job a week later!